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time, Hood's losses since he invaded the State of Tennessee sum up as follows: Six (6) general officers killed, six (6) wounded and one (1) taken prisoner at Franklin--thirteen in all, and about six thousand (6,000) men killed, wounded and taken prisoners at same battle. On the 8th instant, at Murfreesboroa, he had one (1) general officer wounded, about one thousand (1,000) men killed, and two hundred and seven (207) taken prisoners, losing two (2) pieces of artillery. In the battles of the 1st and 16th instant, before Nashville, he had one (1) lieutenant-general severely wounded, one (1) major-general and three (3) brigadier-generals, with four thousand four hundred and sixty-two (4 462) officers and men made prisoners, besides losing fifty-three (53) pieces of artillery and over three thousand (3,000) stand of small-arms. During his retreat we have captured fifteen (15) more guns, and from fifteen hundred (1,500) to two thousand (2,000) prisoners, and a large number of small-ar
was afterwards found to be considerable. On the 4th of December the iron-clad steamer Neosho had joined the flotilla of Lieutenant-Commander Fitch. She carried two 11-inch smooth-bore guns and was well protected against shots from field batteries. On the 9th of December Lieutenant-Commander Fitch started down the river with the Neosho and some of the lighter gun-boats of his command, together with a number of army transports. When nearly abreast of the scene of the encounter of the 3d inst., a large force of Confederates was discovered advantageously posted to dispute the passage of the vessels. Fourteen pieces of artillery at once opened on the gun-boats, accompanied by heavy volleys of musketry from rifle-pits. Fitch, with his usual judgment, had left the transports three miles in the rear under charge of Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Glassford, and when so furiously assailed did not hesitate a moment what to do. He ordered the pilot of the Neosho to proceed slowly, while th
s hard as the condition of the roads would permit, and have succeeded in taking some few prisoners — probably some five or six hundred--since the enemy crossed Duck River. From the best information I have at this time, Hood's losses since he invaded the State of Tennessee sum up as follows: Six (6) general officers killed, six (6) wounded and one (1) taken prisoner at Franklin--thirteen in all, and about six thousand (6,000) men killed, wounded and taken prisoners at same battle. On the 8th instant, at Murfreesboroa, he had one (1) general officer wounded, about one thousand (1,000) men killed, and two hundred and seven (207) taken prisoners, losing two (2) pieces of artillery. In the battles of the 1st and 16th instant, before Nashville, he had one (1) lieutenant-general severely wounded, one (1) major-general and three (3) brigadier-generals, with four thousand four hundred and sixty-two (4 462) officers and men made prisoners, besides losing fifty-three (53) pieces of artillery
he Confederate batteries, the Neosho was struck one hundred and ten times with shot and shell, ranging in size from 20 to 30 pounders, but she received no injury that would have prevented her from going into battle immediately afterwards. From the 7th to the 15th of December, 1864, Lieutenant-Commander Fitch's little flotilla was most active in co-operating with the Army, making reconnoissances and attacks on Confederate batteries whenever they showed themselves along the river. On the 14th inst., Fitch was requested to co-operate with the Army in order to capture some artillery. By a very skillful manoeuvre on the part of the Army and Navy, a battery of four guns was captured. While the Navy were advancing in front, the cavalry surrounded and captured the battery. In the afternoon the same tactics were successful against another battery of four guns, which fell into the hands of the Federal cavalry. The loss of these guns was a severe blow to General Hood at that moment, for h
attery of four guns was captured. While the Navy were advancing in front, the cavalry surrounded and captured the battery. In the afternoon the same tactics were successful against another battery of four guns, which fell into the hands of the Federal cavalry. The loss of these guns was a severe blow to General Hood at that moment, for he was deficient in artillery Surgeon Ninian Pinkney, fleet Surgeon, Mississippi Squadron. In this expedition the Federals found themselves, on the 15th inst., in possession of the field. Throughout the long and harassing operations which followed the invasion of Hood into Tennessee, the Navy co-operated most zealously with the Army, patrolling the river, destroying Hood's pontoons, and conveying troops from point to point in the gun-boats in the absence of other means of transportation. In this way General A. J. Smith, that gallant officer of the Red River expedition, was enabled to effect a secure lodgment near Hood's army. The efficien
losses since he invaded the State of Tennessee sum up as follows: Six (6) general officers killed, six (6) wounded and one (1) taken prisoner at Franklin--thirteen in all, and about six thousand (6,000) men killed, wounded and taken prisoners at same battle. On the 8th instant, at Murfreesboroa, he had one (1) general officer wounded, about one thousand (1,000) men killed, and two hundred and seven (207) taken prisoners, losing two (2) pieces of artillery. In the battles of the 1st and 16th instant, before Nashville, he had one (1) lieutenant-general severely wounded, one (1) major-general and three (3) brigadier-generals, with four thousand four hundred and sixty-two (4 462) officers and men made prisoners, besides losing fifty-three (53) pieces of artillery and over three thousand (3,000) stand of small-arms. During his retreat we have captured fifteen (15) more guns, and from fifteen hundred (1,500) to two thousand (2,000) prisoners, and a large number of small-arms have been
November 4th (search for this): chapter 58
vessels and officers of the Mississippi Squadron, 1865. Acting-rear-admiral. S. P. Lee, who followed Rear-Admiral Porter in October, 1864, in the command of the Mississippi Squadron, was not fortunate on his arrival in the West. On the 4th of November, Admiral Lee reports the loss of the tin-clad gun-boat Undine in an engagement with the Confederates on the Tennessee. The enemy had seven pieces of artillery against the gun-boat's four. On the 4th of November the light-draft gun-boats 4th of November the light-draft gun-boats Towah, Key West and Elfin had a severe engagement with the enemy, lasting several hours, when Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant E. M. King, finding it impossible to save the vessels, ordered them to be set on fire and abandoned. These gun-boats had previously recaptured and burned what was left of the Undine and also the transport Venus. The latter and seven other transports were obliged to be destroyed to prevent their falling into the hands of the enemy. The commanding officers of these light
December 3rd (search for this): chapter 58
ood's entire army was reported as moving on that place, the scene of the late destruction of the gunboats and transports. It is not likely that Acting Rear-Admiral Lee had been apprised of the advance of Hood's army into Tennessee, as otherwise he would have sent some iron-clads to that quarter, since the tin-clads were entirely too light to contend against the heavy batteries opposed to them. Soon after these events, the Carondelet was sent to Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, who, on the 3d of December, had pushed on up to Nashville in the expectation of cooperating with General Thomas against the advancing forces of Hood. The Carondelet, Acting-Master Charles W. Miller, was stationed to assist that portion of the army resting on the river, while the other vessels of Fitch's command were kept in readiness to move wherever they might be required. During the day, Lieutenant-Commander Fitch made constant trips up and down the river in the gun-boat Moose, getting everything in readiness
December 4th (search for this): chapter 58
required great judgment and coolness to avoid collision. The greatest width of the stream was seventy-five yards, and it was so filled with smoke that it was almost impossible to see anything. The little flotilla arrived in Nashville with the two recaptured transports, Prairie State and Prima Donna, in tow, and also the Magnet, which had been retaken from the enemy. The loss of the Confederates in their engagement with the gun-boats was afterwards found to be considerable. On the 4th of December the iron-clad steamer Neosho had joined the flotilla of Lieutenant-Commander Fitch. She carried two 11-inch smooth-bore guns and was well protected against shots from field batteries. On the 9th of December Lieutenant-Commander Fitch started down the river with the Neosho and some of the lighter gun-boats of his command, together with a number of army transports. When nearly abreast of the scene of the encounter of the 3d inst., a large force of Confederates was discovered advantag
December 9th (search for this): chapter 58
illa arrived in Nashville with the two recaptured transports, Prairie State and Prima Donna, in tow, and also the Magnet, which had been retaken from the enemy. The loss of the Confederates in their engagement with the gun-boats was afterwards found to be considerable. On the 4th of December the iron-clad steamer Neosho had joined the flotilla of Lieutenant-Commander Fitch. She carried two 11-inch smooth-bore guns and was well protected against shots from field batteries. On the 9th of December Lieutenant-Commander Fitch started down the river with the Neosho and some of the lighter gun-boats of his command, together with a number of army transports. When nearly abreast of the scene of the encounter of the 3d inst., a large force of Confederates was discovered advantageously posted to dispute the passage of the vessels. Fourteen pieces of artillery at once opened on the gun-boats, accompanied by heavy volleys of musketry from rifle-pits. Fitch, with his usual judgment, had
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