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Fort Henry (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
s. Finding it would be impossible to get the transports below the batteries, without having them cut to pieces, Fitch sent them back to Nashville under convoy of the Fair Play and Silver Lake. But Fitch was not to be balked by the Confederate batteries as long as his ammunition lasted. He set all hands to work to clear away the debris, and then proceeded down the river to his old position, taking with him the Carondelet, a vessel which had withstood the tempest of shot and shell from Forts Henry. Donelson, Vicksburg and Grand Gulf. Having secured the Carondelet to the bank above the enemy's batteries, with orders not to open fire until after the Neosho should engage, Fitch, in the latter vessel, proceeded below the Confederate batteries, rounded-to, and opened as before. As on the former occasion, the enemy opened also, but this time they got the worst of it, the Carondelet, with her heavy guns, dealing destruction right and left. Two of the enemy's pieces were soon dismoun
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
ndelet was sent to Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, who, on the 3d of December, had pushed on up to Nashville in the expectation of cooperating with General Thomas against the advancing forces of Hood. Tenemy's left wing had reached the river and planted batteries at Bell's Mill, four miles below Nashville by land, but, owing to the bends in the river, eighteen miles by water. It was learned that tlled with smoke that it was almost impossible to see anything. The little flotilla arrived in Nashville with the two recaptured transports, Prairie State and Prima Donna, in tow, and also the Magnetthe transports below the batteries, without having them cut to pieces, Fitch sent them back to Nashville under convoy of the Fair Play and Silver Lake. But Fitch was not to be balked by the Confedoners, losing two (2) pieces of artillery. In the battles of the 1st and 16th instant, before Nashville, he had one (1) lieutenant-general severely wounded, one (1) major-general and three (3) briga
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
sand-bars. Notwithstanding it had been evident from the commencement of the civil war that Tennessee was one of the prizes for which the Confederacy would contend, and in spite of all the troublewhole State, so that when General Sherman defeated Hood, at Atlanta, the latter fell back upon Tennessee, and but for the generalship and foresight of that sturdy old Roman, George H. Thomas, a greats not likely that Acting Rear-Admiral Lee had been apprised of the advance of Hood's army into Tennessee, as otherwise he would have sent some iron-clads to that quarter, since the tin-clads were entield. Throughout the long and harassing operations which followed the invasion of Hood into Tennessee, the Navy co-operated most zealously with the Army, patrolling the river, destroying Hood's po River. From the best information I have at this time, Hood's losses since he invaded the State of Tennessee sum up as follows: Six (6) general officers killed, six (6) wounded and one (1) taken pris
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
, Jas. Cutler; Acting-Third-Assistant, C. W. Egster and R. M. Myers. Ozark--Fourth-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Geo. W. Brown; Acting-Master, John Powell; Acting-Ensigns, Jos. Moyer, C. M. Bragg and C. M. Fuller; Acting-Master's Mates, N. T. Brown, G. A. Ege and D. C. Fralick; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, F. T. Gillette; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistants, J. H. Everhart and A. J. Sypher; Acting-Second-Assistants, J. L. Parsons and G. M. Baker; Acting-Third-Assistants, C. Beal and South well Lyon; Acting Gunner, J. F. Riblett; Acting-Carpenter, H. J. Ervin. Peosta--Fourth rate. Acting-Volunteer Lieutenant, J. E. Smith; Acting-Master, J. L. Bryant; Acting-Ensigns, C. H. Gullick, R. T. Nelson, J. W. Richards and W. W. Phillips; Acting-Master's Mates. E. A. Dumont; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, Isaac T. Coates; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. C. Spalding; Engineers: Acting-First Assistants, Perry South and J. Bolejack; Acting-Second-Assistant, T. M. Sloan; Acting-Third-Assis
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
shoals and sand-bars. Notwithstanding it had been evident from the commencement of the civil war that Tennessee was one of the prizes for which the Confederacy would contend, and in spite of all the trouble the Federal Army and Navy had incurred to get the State under subjection, it had again been abandoned to the tender mercies of the Confederate rangers. General Thomas, with a comparatively small force, was left to occupy the whole State, so that when General Sherman defeated Hood, at Atlanta, the latter fell back upon Tennessee, and but for the generalship and foresight of that sturdy old Roman, George H. Thomas, a great disaster would have overtaken the Union cause. The Confederate General, Forrest, had invested Johnson ville, and Hood's entire army was reported as moving on that place, the scene of the late destruction of the gunboats and transports. It is not likely that Acting Rear-Admiral Lee had been apprised of the advance of Hood's army into Tennessee, as otherwise
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
it would be impossible to get the transports below the batteries, without having them cut to pieces, Fitch sent them back to Nashville under convoy of the Fair Play and Silver Lake. But Fitch was not to be balked by the Confederate batteries as long as his ammunition lasted. He set all hands to work to clear away the debris, and then proceeded down the river to his old position, taking with him the Carondelet, a vessel which had withstood the tempest of shot and shell from Forts Henry. Donelson, Vicksburg and Grand Gulf. Having secured the Carondelet to the bank above the enemy's batteries, with orders not to open fire until after the Neosho should engage, Fitch, in the latter vessel, proceeded below the Confederate batteries, rounded-to, and opened as before. As on the former occasion, the enemy opened also, but this time they got the worst of it, the Carondelet, with her heavy guns, dealing destruction right and left. Two of the enemy's pieces were soon dismounted, and by d
Ouachita (United States) (search for this): chapter 58
s now drawing rapidly to a close. The retreat of Hood left the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers comparatively free from Confederates, and there was little prospect of another invasion of the State while General Thomas remained in command. The vessels of the Mississippi Squadron were scattered along the great river, where the guerillas still carried on their operations on a small scale. Very little occurred that could embellish the pages of history. The Red River region was revisited, the Washita and Black Rivers patrolled, and every precaution taken to guard those inland waters. At this time the Confederate ram Webb succeeded in making her way past all the vessels of the fleet and reached a point twenty-five miles below New Orleans, where she was destroyed, as we have heretofore mentioned. This episode created quite an excitement in the fleet for the time, but it appears that no one was to blame for the Webb getting so far down the river unharmed. The dash of the Webb was the
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
impossible to get the transports below the batteries, without having them cut to pieces, Fitch sent them back to Nashville under convoy of the Fair Play and Silver Lake. But Fitch was not to be balked by the Confederate batteries as long as his ammunition lasted. He set all hands to work to clear away the debris, and then proceeded down the river to his old position, taking with him the Carondelet, a vessel which had withstood the tempest of shot and shell from Forts Henry. Donelson, Vicksburg and Grand Gulf. Having secured the Carondelet to the bank above the enemy's batteries, with orders not to open fire until after the Neosho should engage, Fitch, in the latter vessel, proceeded below the Confederate batteries, rounded-to, and opened as before. As on the former occasion, the enemy opened also, but this time they got the worst of it, the Carondelet, with her heavy guns, dealing destruction right and left. Two of the enemy's pieces were soon dismounted, and by dark all bu
Grand Gulf (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
get the transports below the batteries, without having them cut to pieces, Fitch sent them back to Nashville under convoy of the Fair Play and Silver Lake. But Fitch was not to be balked by the Confederate batteries as long as his ammunition lasted. He set all hands to work to clear away the debris, and then proceeded down the river to his old position, taking with him the Carondelet, a vessel which had withstood the tempest of shot and shell from Forts Henry. Donelson, Vicksburg and Grand Gulf. Having secured the Carondelet to the bank above the enemy's batteries, with orders not to open fire until after the Neosho should engage, Fitch, in the latter vessel, proceeded below the Confederate batteries, rounded-to, and opened as before. As on the former occasion, the enemy opened also, but this time they got the worst of it, the Carondelet, with her heavy guns, dealing destruction right and left. Two of the enemy's pieces were soon dismounted, and by dark all but two of them w
Shreveport (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 58
mander Fitch and his men. end of the Confederate Navy in the Mississippi region. surrender of Confederate property at Shreveport. list of vessels and officers of the Mississippi Squadron, 1865. Acting-rear-admiral. S. P. Lee, who followed Rear-d the last attempt to carry out a valuable cargo of cotton and naval stores; which, had it been left on the levee at Shreveport, La., a few days longer, could have been shipped to New Orleans, openly insuring the owners a good profit. The Confederate naval officer in command at Shreveport, Lieutenant J. H. Carter, notified the U. S. naval authorities at the mouth of Red River that he was ready to surrender to the United States Government all the property in his possession, consisting of one as the last of the Confederate Navy in the Mississippi region. When Lieutenant-Commander W. E. Fitzhugh proceeded to Shreveport to take possession of the Confederate naval property at that place, he was received in a friendly manner, and all seeme
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