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The Trent was one of a line of British steamers which ran regularly between Vera Cruz and Havana, thence to St. Thomas, and from there to England. The company had a contract with the British Government to carry the mails, and its steamers had ample accommodations for the passenger travel between England and the West Indies. The Trent left the port of Havana on the morning of the 7th of November, under the command of Captain Moir. Nothing of interest occurred until about noon of the 8th, when, in the narrow passage of the Old Bahama Channel, opposite the Panador Grande light, from the Trent was seen a steamer ahead, apparently waiting and showing no colors. The Trent at this time was on her legitimate voyage; she had touched at no port in the Southern Confederacy, and had held no communication with vessels coming from or going to the insurrectionary States; neither was she bound herself to any Southern port, but was pursuing the route usually traveled by the company's mai
1861. Sir:--We desire to communicate to you by this memorandum the facts attending our arrest yesterday on board the British mail steamer Trent, by your order. and our transfer to this ship. We, the undersigned, embarked at Havana on the 7th inst. as passengers on board the Trent, Captain Moir, bound to the Island of St. Thomas, in one of the regular passenger lines of the British Royal Mail Steamship Company, running from Vera Cruz, via Havana, to St. Thomas, and thence to Southampton, epresentative of the said company; Mr. Slidell being accompanied by his family, consisting of his wife, four children and a servant, and Mr. Eustis by his wife and servants. The Trent left Havana about 8 o'clock, a. m., on the morning of the 7th inst., and pursued her voyage uninterruptedly until intercepted by the United States steamer San Jacinto, under your command, on the following day (the 8th) in the manner now to be related: When the San Jacinto was first observed, several miles di
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