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Browsing named entities in a specific section of John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies. Search the whole document.

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Jonesboro (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ot and many musket shots from our line of investment, that overshot their mark, went into the habitations of women and children. General Hardee did the same at Jonesboroa, and General Johnston did the same, last summer, at Jackson, Mississippi. I have not accused you of heartless cruelty, but merely instance these cases of very red to flee from your fraternal embraces. You are equally unfortunate in your attempt to find a justification for this act of cruelty, either in the defence of Jonesboroa, by General Hardee, or of Atlanta, by myself. General Hardee defended his position in front of Jonesboroa at the expense of injury to the houses; an ordinary, Jonesboroa at the expense of injury to the houses; an ordinary, proper, and justifiable act of war. I defended Atlanta at the same risk and cost. If there was any fault in either case, it was your own, in not giving notice, especially in the case of Atlanta, of your purpose to shell the town, which is usual in war among civilized nations. No inhabitant was expelled from his home and fireside
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
are so handy. You yourself burned dwelling houses along your parapet, and I have seen to-day fifty houses that you have rendered uninhabitable because they stood in the way of your forts and men. You defended Atlanta on a line so close to town that every cannon shot and many musket shots from our line of investment, that overshot their mark, went into the habitations of women and children. General Hardee did the same at Jonesboroa, and General Johnston did the same, last summer, at Jackson, Mississippi. I have not accused you of heartless cruelty, but merely instance these cases of very recent occurrence, and could go on and enumerate hundreds of others, and challenge any fair man to judge which of us has the heart of pity for the families of a brave people. I say it is kindness to these families of Atlanta to remove them now, at once, from scenes that women and children should not be exposed to, and the brave people should scorn to commit their wives and children to the rude
Resaca (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
d the sick, and then burn their homes; on the contrary, Napier, Peninsular War, B. VI, chaps. 4 and 7. Recovering and restoring a part of the plunder, he caused the inhabitants remaining in town to be treated with respect; he invited, by proclamation, all those who had fled to return, and he demanded no contribution; but restraining with a firm hand the violence of his men, he contrived, from the captured public property, to support the Army and even to succor the poorest and most distressed of the population. Although it is customary, previous to a general assault of a fortified town of which the demand for surrender has been rejected, that the commanding officer give warning (on account of the extraordinary sacrifice of life, to which his troops must necessarily be subjected) that he will not be responsible for the lives of the captured, as did Lieutenant General Lee in my name at Resaca. No officer should allow his soldiers to bum and pillage after victory has been secured.
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ivision of the Mississippi, in the field, Atlanta, Georgia, September 7th, 1864. General Hood, Commaoper to expel from their homes in the city of Atlanta. Had you seen proper to let the matter rest fence of Jonesboroa, by General Hardee, or of Atlanta, by myself. General Hardee defended his posiroper, and justifiable act of war. I defended Atlanta at the same risk and cost. If there was any not giving notice, especially in the case of Atlanta, of your purpose to shell the town, which is t is an act of kindness to these families of Atlanta. Butler only banished from New Orleans the rrters Military Division of the Mississippi, Atlanta, Ga., September, 14th, 1864. General J. B. Hood,ssert, in order to justify certain acts, that Atlanta was a regularly fortified town. And whereas rmination of the Federal commander: Atlanta, Georgia, September 11th, 1864. Major General W. T the course pursued toward the inhabitants of Atlanta is in accordance with those laws which are no[24 more...]
Porto (Portugal) (search for this): chapter 14
tary law of nations does not allow us to inflict such punishments, except for enormous offences against the law of nations. Vattel, B. III, chap. 9, sec. 173. Incorporated by Halleck. Laws of War, chap. 19, sec. 24. When General Lee entered Pennsylvania with his Army, he gave strict orders to destroy no property, and to pay for all provisions obtained from the enemy. Marshal Soult was likewise magnanimous in his conduct, after he had been not only compelled to storm the defences of Oporto, but to fight from street to street, in order to finally force a surrender. Napier states that the French found some of their comrades who had been taken prisoners, fastened upright and living, but with their eyes burst, their tongues torn out, and their other members mutilated and gashed. This ghastly sight notwithstanding, many of the French soldiers and officers endeavored, at the risk of their lives, to check the vengeance of their comrades, Soult did not, even after this fearful resis
Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
overt act was committed by the (to you) hated Lincoln Government; tried to force Kentucky and Missouri into rebellion, spite of themselves; falsified the vote of Louisiana; turned loose your privateers to plunder unarmed ships; expelled Union families by the thousands, burned their houses, and declared, by an act of your Congress, the bayonet, and labors daily, by force and fraud, to fasten its hateful tyranny upon the unfortunate freemen of these States. You say we falsified the vote of Louisiana. The truth is, Louisiana not only separated herself from your Government by nearly a unanimous vote of her people, but has vindicated the act upon every battle-Louisiana not only separated herself from your Government by nearly a unanimous vote of her people, but has vindicated the act upon every battle-field from Gettysburg to the Sabine, and has exhibited an heroic devotion to her decision, which challenges the admiration and respect of every man capable of feeling sympathy for the oppressed or admiration for heroic valor. You say that we turned loose pirates to plunder your unarmed ships. The truth is, when you robbed us of o
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ould remove, those who prefer it to go South, and the rest North. For the latter I can provide food and transportation to points of their election in Tennessee, Kentucky, or further North. For the former I can provide transportation by cars as far as Rough and Ready, and also wagons; but, that their removal may be made with as lrrisons sent to protect your people against negroes and Indians, long before any overt act was committed by the (to you) hated Lincoln Government; tried to force Kentucky and Missouri into rebellion, spite of themselves; falsified the vote of Louisiana; turned loose your privateers to plunder unarmed ships; expelled Union families are to this day, with a unanimity unexampled in the history of the world, warring against your attempts to become their masters. You say that we tried to force Kentucky and Missouri into rebellion in spite of themselves. The truth is, my Government, from the beginning of this struggle to this hour, has again and again offered,
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
and glacis, similar to the fortifications on Governor's Island, and those of Fortress Monroe. In the construction of permanent works, every exertion is made to render them as strong and durable as possible. It might be supposed, from General Sherman's Memoirs, that Atlanta was not only a thoroughly fortified town, but was provisioned to endure a siege of a year or more, after all communication was cut off; that it possessed arsenals and machine shops as extensive as those in Richmond and Macon — an illusion created, probably, by a dilapidated foundry, near the Augusta road, which had been in use prior to the war. General Sherman, therefore, cannot assert, in order to justify certain acts, that Atlanta was a regularly fortified town. And whereas I marched out at night, allowing him the following day to enter the city, unopposed, as he himself acknowledges, and whereas no provocation was given by the authorities, civil or military, he can in no manner claim that extreme war measure
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ontroversy by characterizing an official act of mine in unfair and improper terms. I reiterate my former answer, and to the only new matter contained in your rejoinder add: We have no negro allies in this Army; not a single negro soldier left Chattanooga with this Army, or is with it now. There are a few guarding Chattanooga, which General Stedman sent at one time to drive Wheeler out of Dalton. I was not bound by the laws of war to give notice of the shelling of Atlanta, a fortified townChattanooga, which General Stedman sent at one time to drive Wheeler out of Dalton. I was not bound by the laws of war to give notice of the shelling of Atlanta, a fortified town, with magazines, arsenals, foundries, and public stores; you were bound to take notice. See the books. This is the conclusion of our correspondence, which I did not begin, and terminate with satisfaction. I am, with respect, your obedient servant, W. T. Sherman, Major General Commanding. I preferred here to close the discussion, and, therefore, made no reply to his last communication inviting me to see the books. I will at present, however, consider this subject, and cite a few
Dalton, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
as an act of studied and ingenious cruelty. It is not unprecedented; for General Johnston himself very wisely and properly removed the families all the way from Dalton down, and I see no reason why Atlanta should be excepted. Nor is it necessary to appeal to the dark history of war, when recent and modern examples are so handy.l-sufficient reason for disregarding the laws of God and man. You say that General Johnston himself very wisely and properly removed the families all the way from Dalton down. It is due to that gallant soldier and gentleman to say that no act of his distinguished career gives the least color to your unfounded aspersions upon his o soldier left Chattanooga with this Army, or is with it now. There are a few guarding Chattanooga, which General Stedman sent at one time to drive Wheeler out of Dalton. I was not bound by the laws of war to give notice of the shelling of Atlanta, a fortified town, with magazines, arsenals, foundries, and public stores; you
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