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Corinth (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
the 9th of October that the railroad to Decatur be repaired, nothing had been done on the 1st of November towards the accomplishment of this important object, as the following dispatch from the super-intendent of the road will show: Corinth, Mississippi, November 1st, 1864. General G. T. Beauregard. I fear you have greatly over-estimated the capacity and condition of this railroad to transport the supplies for General Hood's Army. Most of the bridges between here and Okolona were detless be prevented from capturing Augusta, Charleston, and Savannah, and he may yet be made to experience serious loss before reaching the coast. On the i6th of November, when about leaving Tuscumbia, Alabama, on a tour of inspection to Corinth, Mississippi, I was informed by General Hood of the report just received by him, that Sherman would probably move from Atlanta into Georgia. I instructed him at once to repeat his orders to General Wheeler to watch closely Sherman's movements, and, sh
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
you have not been-able to avail yourself of that advantage, during his march northward from Atlanta. Hope the opportunity will be offered before he is extensively recruited. If you keep his communications destroyed, he will most probably seek to concentrate for an attack on you. But if, as reported to you, he has sent a large part of his force southward, you may first beat him in detail, and, subsequently, without serious obstruction or danger to the country in your rear, advance to the Ohio river. Jefferson Davis. The President, as indicated, was evidently under the impression that the Army should have been equal to battle by the time it had reached the Alabama line, and was averse to my going into Tennessee. Almost every writer upon the subject of my campaign into Tennessee, has fallen into the popular error that the President ordered me into that State; and, strange to say, General Taylor, brother-in-law of Mr. Davis, has also grossly crred in this regard, when he could h
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
the country at this period was well nigh drained of all its resources. General Beauregard, as previously mentioned, left me on the I7th of November. On the 19th, the preliminaries to the campaign being completed, the cavalry was ordered to move forward. The succeeding day, Lee's Corps marched to the front a distance of about ten miles on the Chisholm road, between the Lawrenceburg and Waynesboroa roads. The same day, I received the following dispatch from General Beauregard: West Point, November 20th, 10 a. m. General J. B. Hood. Push on active offensive immediately. Colonel Brent informs me first order for movement of one of Jackson's brigades to Wheeler has been suspended by you. It is indispensable it should be sent by best and quickest route to Newnan to cut off communications of enemy with Kingston, and to protect (here in cipher, of which I have not the key). I have appealed to the people of Georgia to defend their homes. G. T. Beauregard, General. On the
Macon (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
knowledging the receipt of my telegram of the 24th November, was received by me on the road from Macon to this place. With the limited reliable means at our command, I believe that all that could mplated taking the offensive at once, as had already been decided upon. I then left Corinth for Macon, where I arrived on the 24th of November. I did not countermand the campaign in Tennessee to t be doubled in a levy en masse. General Cobb informed me, at the same time, that atAugusta, Macon, and Columbus, he had about six thousand five hundred (6500) local troops, and that he hoped shortly to have collected at his reserve and convalescent camps, near Macon, twenty-five hundred (2500) men. Of these nine thousand (9000) men, he supposed about one-half, or five thousand (5000), could pike, December 8th, 1864. Honorable J. A. Seddon, Secretary of War. General G. T. Beauregard, Macon, Ga. A good Lieutenant General should be sent here at once to command the corps now commanded by
Allatoona (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
scumbia, at which place I arrived on the 31st of October. Johnson's Division, which held possession of Florence, was reinforced the same day by Clayton's Division. Thus the Confederate Army rested upon the banks of the Tennessee one month after its departure from Palmetto. It had been almost continuously in motion during this interim; it had by rapid moves and manoeuvres, and with only a small loss, drawn Sherman as far north as he stood in the early Spring. The killed and wounded at Allatoona had been replaced by absentees who returned to ranks, and, as usual in such operations, the number of desertions became of no consequence. In addition to the official returns, my authority for the last assertion is Judge Cofer, of Kentucky, who was provost marshal of the Army at this period, and is at present one of the district judges of his State. About two years ago, in Louisville, he informed me that he had been impressed by the small number of desertions reported to him during the c
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
unceasingly toward the accomplishment of this important object. On the 17th, General Beauregard issued the following order previous to his departure for Montgomery, Alabama: Headquarters Military Division of the West, Tuscumbia, Alabama, November 17th, 1864. General:--General Beauregard desires me to say that he desiret in such case Clanton's brigade is subject to his orders. The headquarters of this military division will be removed, in the morning, from this place to Montgomery, Alabama. I am, General, respectfully, your obedient servant, George W. Brent, Colonel and A. A. G. General J. B. Hood, Commanding Army of Tennessee. The ensnessee in pursuit of Sherman, would have opened to Thomas's force the richest portion of the State of Alabama, and would have made nearly certain the capture of Montgomery, Selma, and Mobile, without insuring the defeat of Sherman. 5th. In October last, when passing through Georgia to assume command of the Military Division of
Louisville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
only a small loss, drawn Sherman as far north as he stood in the early Spring. The killed and wounded at Allatoona had been replaced by absentees who returned to ranks, and, as usual in such operations, the number of desertions became of no consequence. In addition to the official returns, my authority for the last assertion is Judge Cofer, of Kentucky, who was provost marshal of the Army at this period, and is at present one of the district judges of his State. About two years ago, in Louisville, he informed me that he had been impressed by the small number of desertions reported to him during the campaigns to the rear of Sherman, and into Tennessee. Notwithstanding my request as early as the 9th of October that the railroad to Decatur be repaired, nothing had been done on the 1st of November towards the accomplishment of this important object, as the following dispatch from the super-intendent of the road will show: Corinth, Mississippi, November 1st, 1864. General G. T.
Hornady (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
e 30th; Johnson's Division crossed the river, and took possession of that town. My headquarters were during the 27th and 28th at the house of General Garth, near Decatur, where also stopped General Beauregard. While the Army turned Decatur, I ordered a slight demonstration to be made against the town till our forces passed safelyDecatur, I ordered a slight demonstration to be made against the town till our forces passed safely beyond, when I moved toward Tuscumbia, at which place I arrived on the 31st of October. Johnson's Division, which held possession of Florence, was reinforced the same day by Clayton's Division. Thus the Confederate Army rested upon the banks of the Tennessee one month after its departure from Palmetto. It had been almost contreported to him during the campaigns to the rear of Sherman, and into Tennessee. Notwithstanding my request as early as the 9th of October that the railroad to Decatur be repaired, nothing had been done on the 1st of November towards the accomplishment of this important object, as the following dispatch from the super-intendent
Columbia, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
en advantage of every available road, reached Columbia, via Mount Pleasant. Forrest operated in ourand, by forced marches day and night, reached Columbia, upon Duck river, just in time to prevent ourhe hope of cutting off General Schofield from Columbia, and barely failed in this object, as the NatThe enemy having formed line of battle around Columbia, Lee's Corps filed into position with its rigof Mrs. Warfield, about three miles south of Columbia. The two Armies lay opposite each other duistinctly hear the roar of Lee's artillery at Columbia, whilst a feint was made to cross the river. t two miles and in full view of the pike from Columbia to Spring Hill and Franklin. I here halted ahofield's main body still in front of Lee, at Columbia, up to a late hour in the day. I thought it pston's Division, and Lee's two Divisions from Columbia, to have enveloped, routed, and captured SchoLieutenant General Lee performed his duty, at Columbia, with great skill and fidelity which were cro[2 more...]
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
sarily, have been over roads with all the bridges destroyed, and through a devastated country, affording no subsistence or forage; and, moreover, it was feared that a retrograde movement on our part would seriously deplete the Army by desertions. 4th. To have sent off the most or the whole of the Army of Tennessee in pursuit of Sherman, would have opened to Thomas's force the richest portion of the State of Alabama, and would have made nearly certain the capture of Montgomery, Selma, and Mobile, without insuring the defeat of Sherman. 5th. In October last, when passing through Georgia to assume command of the Military Division of the West, I was informed.by Governor Brown that he could probably raise, in case of necessity, about six thousand (6000) men, which I supposed might be doubled in a levy en masse. General Cobb informed me, at the same time, that atAugusta, Macon, and Columbus, he had about six thousand five hundred (6500) local troops, and that he hoped shortly to
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