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Sherman, vast indeed might have been the results achieved, and far greater his title to distinction. Although Fabius succeeded in wasting in a great measure the strength of his adversary, it however required the boldness and the genius of Scipio to finally defeat Hannibal, and place Carthage beneath the heel of the proud Roman. General Johnston not only signally failed in the Fabian policy, but, unfortunately, declined to act the part of Scipio Africanus, at Dalton, in the early Spring of 1864. History records the deeds of this famed warrior who, whilst the Carthagenians were still warring in Italy, aroused the Roman pride, gathered together his legions, moved to the rear of the enemy, transferred the war into Africa, forced the recall of Hannibal, routed his Army in battle, placed Carthage at his feet, and brought security and prosperity to his countrymen. Arnold, in his History of Rome, gives a lengthy and interesting description of this bold and brilliant move, and of the vi
Scipio Africanus (search for this): chapter 18
ired the boldness and the genius of Scipio to finally defeat Hannibal, and place Carthage beneath the heel of the proud Roman. General Johnston not only signally failed in the Fabian policy, but, unfortunately, declined to act the part of Scipio Africanus, at Dalton, in the early Spring of 1864. History records the deeds of this famed warrior who, whilst the Carthagenians were still warring in Italy, aroused the Roman pride, gathered together his legions, moved to the rear of the enemy, trpleasure beyond all their hopes, and restored a firmness to their empire, which had been shaken by so many tempests. Since General Johnston failed to practice the art of war in accordance with the principles either of Fabius Maximus or of Scipio Africanus, and since he fought not a single general battle during the entire war of Secession, what just claim has he to generalship? A man may be learned in anatomy, and perfect in the theory of surgery; he may be able to thoroughly describe the man
e Fabian policy, but, unfortunately, declined to act the part of Scipio Africanus, at Dalton, in the early Spring of 1864. History records the deeds of this famed warrior who, whilst the Carthagenians were still warring in Italy, aroused the Roman pride, gathered together his legions, moved to the rear of the enemy, transferred the war into Africa, forced the recall of Hannibal, routed his Army in battle, placed Carthage at his feet, and brought security and prosperity to his countrymen. Arnold, in his History of Rome, gives a lengthy and interesting description of this bold and brilliant move, and of the victories which followed. Plutarch condenses the whole into these few words: After Scipio was gone over into Africa, an account was soon brought to Rome of his glorious and wonderful achievements. This account was followed by rich spoils which confirmed it. A Numidian king was taken prisoner; two camps were burned and destroyed, and in them a vast number of men, arms and horses;
Chapter 18: Rashness Johnston Fabius Scipio. Before closing these pages, I request the privilege of correcting a false impryears, different commanders sallied forth and delivered battle; but Fabius continued to adhere strictly to his plan of warfare, and stubbornlyannibal, and was only spared utter destruction by the timely aid of Fabius. Varro marched out, fought the Carthagenians near Cannaee, was defined important advantages over the enemy; but, as history tells us, Fabius permitted no allurement of his foe, nor outcry of his countrymen, ten in his own Army. * * * Thus the soldiers were brought to despise Fabius, and by way of derision to call him the pedagogue of Hannibal, whil Italy laid waste with fire and sword. And he asked the friends of Fabius whether he intended to take his Army up into heaven, as if he had bsults achieved, and far greater his title to distinction. Although Fabius succeeded in wasting in a great measure the strength of his adversa
s color to their charge of rashness as a commander, in the following passage: I did not suppose that General Hood, though rash, would venture to attack fortified places like Allatoona, Resaca, Decatur and Nashville; but he did so, and in so doing, played into our hands perfectly. Sherman's Memoirs, vol. II, page 167. And yet from other portions of his Memoirs it will be seen that I did not attack either Resaca, Decatur, or Nashville. My official report will also show that Major General French assaulted Allatoona, whilst under discretionary orders. Thus, in none of these instances is General Sherman correct. Touching this same accusation of rashness, put forth by my opponents, I shall merely state that the confidence reposed in me upon so many occasions, and during a service of three years, by Generals Lee, Jackson, and Longstreet, in addition to the letters of these distinguished commanders, expressive of satisfaction with my course, is a sufficient refutation of the c
o quit the mountainous regions, and accept the gage of battle with Hannibal upon the plains. Neither the taunts nor stratagems of his enemy, l, dashed down from the heights with one-half of the Army, engaged Hannibal, and was only spared utter destruction by the timely aid of Fabiusespise Fabius, and by way of derision to call him the pedagogue of Hannibal, while they extolled Minucius as a great man and one that acted upr required the boldness and the genius of Scipio to finally defeat Hannibal, and place Carthage beneath the heel of the proud Roman. Generaf the enemy, transferred the war into Africa, forced the recall of Hannibal, routed his Army in battle, placed Carthage at his feet, and brougmber of men, arms and horses; and the Carthagenians sent orders to Hannibal to quit his fruitless hopes in Italy, and return home to defend his own country. * * Soon after, Scipio defeated Hannibal in a pitched battle, pulled down the pride of Carthage, and trod it under foot. This
J. B. Hood (search for this): chapter 18
Chapter 18: Rashness Johnston Fabius Scipio. Before closing these pages, I request the privilege of correcting a false impression which has gained ground in my regard, and which is, I may say, the outcome of inimical statements of certain writers who have followed in the wake of Pollard and Johnston. General Sherman gives color to their charge of rashness as a commander, in the following passage: I did not suppose that General Hood, though rash, would venture to attack fortified places like Allatoona, Resaca, Decatur and Nashville; but he did so, and in so doing, played into our hands perfectly. Sherman's Memoirs, vol. II, page 167. And yet from other portions of his Memoirs it will be seen that I did not attack either Resaca, Decatur, or Nashville. My official report will also show that Major General French assaulted Allatoona, whilst under discretionary orders. Thus, in none of these instances is General Sherman correct. Touching this same accus
s General Sherman correct. Touching this same accusation of rashness, put forth by my opponents, I shall merely state that the confidence reposed in me upon so many occasions, and during a service of three years, by Generals Lee, Jackson, and Longstreet, in addition to the letters of these distinguished commanders, expressive of satisfaction with my course, is a sufficient refutation of the charge. The above allegation is not more erroneous than the following inference is illogical. Van Horne, in his History of the Army of the Cumberland, speaks in commendation of my movement to the rear of Sherman, after the fall of Atlanta, but regards the circumstance as unfortunate for the Confederacy that Johnston was not summoned to Palmetto at the beginning of the new campaign, in order to insure its successful issue. The writer must assuredly have been ignorant of the antecedents of this General when he formed this conclusion; it seems, indeed, preposterous to suppose that General John
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): chapter 18
from other portions of his Memoirs it will be seen that I did not attack either Resaca, Decatur, or Nashville. My official report will also show that Major General French assaulted Allatoona, whilst under discretionary orders. Thus, in none of these instances is General Sherman correct. Touching this same accusation of rashness, put forth by my opponents, I shall merely state that the confidence reposed in me upon so many occasions, and during a service of three years, by Generals Lee, Jackson, and Longstreet, in addition to the letters of these distinguished commanders, expressive of satisfaction with my course, is a sufficient refutation of the charge. The above allegation is not more erroneous than the following inference is illogical. Van Horne, in his History of the Army of the Cumberland, speaks in commendation of my movement to the rear of Sherman, after the fall of Atlanta, but regards the circumstance as unfortunate for the Confederacy that Johnston was not summoned
Joseph E. Johnston (search for this): chapter 18
Chapter 18: Rashness Johnston Fabius Scipio. Before closing these pages, I request the priviters who have followed in the wake of Pollard and Johnston. General Sherman gives color to their charge ofrcumstance as unfortunate for the Confederacy that Johnston was not summoned to Palmetto at the beginning of tit seems, indeed, preposterous to suppose that General Johnston would have inaugurated a similar movement witharged with rashness, and even recklessness, by General Johnston and his adherents, I may be allowed, in additipart from my own resolution. Therefore when General Johnston retreated from the mountain-fastnesses, crosserthage beneath the heel of the proud Roman. General Johnston not only signally failed in the Fabian policy, had been shaken by so many tempests. Since General Johnston failed to practice the art of war in accordanceat General, unless he has won his spurs. Had General Johnston possessed the requisite spirit and boldness to
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