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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott).

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and, as our whole force of 450 men composed the brigade of Col. A. W. Reynolds, then serving on court-martial, but naturally anxious to be in the field, I ordered him forward to Whiteside, a strong position, 14 miles toward Bridgeport, on the 1st instant. He was directed to observe the enemy and to retard his advance if practicable. In the mean time I had been advised by Colonel Glenn, under date of the 30th, at Dalton, that he would bring on his unarmed regiment as soon as transportation could be procured, and he was confidently expected on the 1st instant. It was necessary to collect the arms belonging to the sick of the Thirty-ninth and Forty-third Georgia Regiments, and with them to arm Colonel Glenn's command. This I undertook, with the purpose of moving on promptly to Colonel Reynolds' support. Colonel Glenn arrived on the 2d, and was soon armed and supplied with ammunition, but the tenor of Colonel Reynolds' dispatches during the day was such as to lead me to think
ime I had been advised by Colonel Glenn, under date of the 30th, at Dalton, that he would bring on his unarmed regiment as soon as transportation could be procured, and he was confidently expected on the 1st instant. It was necessary to collect the arms belonging to the sick of the Thirty-ninth and Forty-third Georgia Regiments, and with them to arm Colonel Glenn's command. This I undertook, with the purpose of moving on promptly to Colonel Reynolds' support. Colonel Glenn arrived on the 2d, and was soon armed and supplied with ammunition, but the tenor of Colonel Reynolds' dispatches during the day was such as to lead me to think it judicious to hold the regiment disposable, lest the enemy should move up on the west side and attempt to cross near Chattanooga. About 10 o'clock that night I received from him the following dispatch: General Leadbetter: Scouts came in from Kelly's Ferry and reported, on reliable information, that the enemy, 5,000 strong, had crossed at Shell
cavalry again drove the enemy beyond the river, but finding them in force, retired back to Corinth. Section returned to camp on the afternoon of June 1. On the 2d received two more 12-pounder howitzers in the battery, and same day moved into Corinth with six pieces, and remained until 8 a. m. next day. On the 4th moved wiFlynt Assistant Adjutant-General. Hdqrs. Fifth Division, Army of the Tennessee, Camp at Chewalla, June 10, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report that on the 2d instant, about 2 p. m., in camp before Corinth, I received General Halleck's orders, You will immediately move with your division and that of General Hurlbut through Co were concentrated at Baldwin with rear guards left to hold the bridges across the Tuscumbia and tributaries, which were not drawn back until the evening of the 2d instant. While at Rienzi, half way to Baldwin, I was informed that on the morning of the 30th ultimo a detachment of the enemy's cavalry had penetrated to Boonevill
anding. I answered: If you are satisfied your information is reliable, burn all the bridges on the railroad and country roads, and fall back with your command to Lookout Mountain. I will meet you there with Colonel Glenn's regiment. D. Leadbetter, Brigadier-General. The point indicated is close to the Tennessee River, where the railroad and all the country roads intersect each other. To this dispatch the colonel replied that he would move accordingly. About 4 a. m. of the 3d we met there, and having selected the best line of defense, too extensive, however, for our force, I placed the men in position, and a bridge on the country road over Lookout Creek, in front, was burned. I also ordered the railroad bridge over the same creek to be burned as soon as our pickets should have come in. Colonel Reynolds then proceeded to town. This railroad bridge was actually not burned until late in the day, but I was on the mountain, and supposed that it had been destroyed earl
ing of the 30th had advanced but 2 miles, when we encamped. Here we lay till May 3, making and repairing roads. On the 3d we crossed Lick Creek and advanced within about 12 miles of Corinth, when we were joined by General Crittenden. Rain opi and camped at Springer's house. Here we first established communication of pickets with General Buells left. On the 3d General Paine's division made a reconnaissance to Farmington. )n the 4th the division moved forward and encamped on the Far the enemy's picket, about 3 miles from Purdy, where a heavy skirmish took place, the enemy's pickets retreating. On the third stand the enemy was discovered drawn up in line of battle, when our force advanced, giving them a volley, causing a panicid not fall under your immediate observation in the movements of yesterday: Moving from camp at 10.30 a. m. on the 3d instant, in light marching order, some 41 miles, to the edge of the swamp lining the creek near Farmington, we were halted and
n from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Lockridge's Mill. Reports. No. 1.-Col. Thomas Claiborne, Sixth Confederate Cavalry. No. 2.-Col. William W. Lowe, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. No. 3.-Capts. William A. Haw and Henning von Minden, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. No. 1.-report of Col. Thomas Claiborne, Sixth Confederate Cavalry. Spring Creek, Tenn., May 9, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report that I left Trenton on May 2 and encamped at King's Bridge. On the 3d encamped at McKenzie's Station, waiting Jackson, who joined me on the 4th, and we marched (whole force about 1,250) to attack a force reported to be at Paris, 250 to 500 strong. I separated into three columns, to surround it and intercept them toward Fort Heiman. At about 4 p. m. entered Paris. The enemy had moved at 10 a. m. toward Dresden. I immediately detached one column, under Lieuten. ant-Colonel Pell, to Boydsville, and with my own joined Colonel Jackson who was on the Dresden r
River. General Dumont is still at Lebanon. Wm. W. Duffield, Colonel, Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. Capt. Oliver D. Greene, Assistant Adjutant-General. Heeadquarters Twenty-Third Brigade, Murfreesborough, Tenn., Tuesday, May 6, 1862. Captain: Agreeably to verbal instructions received from Brig. Gen. E. Dumont, I started in pursuit of the rebel force, commanded by Col. John H. Morgan, which had attacked General Mitchel's train at Pulaski, leaving early on the morning of the 3d instant, and taking with me the Ninth Michigan Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Parkhurst, and the Eighth Kentucky Infantry, Colonel Barnes. Upon reaching Wartrace, and learning that the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry, Colonel Smith, had been ordered to Shelbyville, I directed Colonel Barnes to occupy Wartrace, and protect the bridges at that place with the Eighth Kentucky Infantry, where it still remains. With the Ninth Michigan Infantry I moved on to Shelbyville, reaching that point at 5 o'clock in the a
the earthworks of the Confederates being only from 2 to 4 feet high, they apparently relying upon the creek and adjacent swamp for protection. The following morning this reconnaissance was renewed and its results verified, and it was also ascertained that at the point where Cole Creek could be crossed not a gun from the batteries could be brought to bear, while the ridges in the rear of and overlooking the fortifications would enable our infantry to approach and command them. On the third morning three companies of this command, under Major Bringhurst, of the Forty-sixth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, was ordered to open a road parallel with the chute, secreted from observation by the timber on Flower Island and the main-land. He was likewise instructed to make and launch into the chute, 2 or 3 miles from the fort, a rude bridge, in sections, of cypress logs, taken from a cabin convenient. The orders were to complete the work and encamp on the ground, with a view of removing
skirmish at Lawrenceburg, Tenn. Report of Brig. Gen. Milo S. Hascall, U. S. Army. Hdqrs. Fifteenth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, Field of Shiloh, April 12, 1862. Agreeably to the order of General Wood, I proceeded on the morning of the 4th instant from our camp, 23 miles beyond Waynesborough and about 60 miles from this place, with two regiments of my brigade, to wit, the Twenty-sixth Ohio and the Seventeenth Indiana, together with a detachment of about 600 of the Third Ohio Cavalry, un to join his regiment at Savannah; since which time I have received no tidings from him, but presume he has joined his regiment some time since. The remainder of the cavalry, with myself and staff, bivouacked near Lawrenceburg the night of the 4th, and having procured wagons in the neighborhood with which to transport the captured bacon, started early the next morning, and about noon overtook the infantry of my brigade, who were en route for this place. The next day (6th) we began to hear
rd and to the left some 3 miles to the main Hamburg and Corinth road. On the 4th I made a reconnaissance with General Johnson's brigade to ascertain the position, would gladly speak in detail of their many acts of personal daring. On the 4th day of this month we were moved forward in pursuit of the enemy, and after threeed into Corinth with six pieces, and remained until 8 a. m. next day. On the 4th moved with division to near Blackland, to re-enforce General Pope. Arrived thert, and found him there in possession of Corinth and nothing else. On the 4th instant, pursuant to your order, we started with three days rations in haversacks, t where he had a sharp engagement, and returning, reported at 10 p. m. On the 4th General Buell arrived. On the 5th we took position in order of battle, Asboth fperations of the right wing Army of the Tennessee before Corinth: On the 4th ultimo the right wing commenced its move upon Corinth, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman'
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