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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). Search the whole document.

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rawn from Big Creek and was then encamped near Cumberland Gap. For the moment the execution of my plan was postponed, but not abandoned. I now determined to withdraw my entire force from Cumberland Ford, and to cause the sides of the Pine Mountain to be mined, so that a hundred thousand tons of rocks and trees could be hurled into the valley should the enemy attempt to strike at our line of supplies. The mines were constructed by Capt. S. S. Lyon, but they were never sprung. On the 6th instant the march was again resumed, Munday's cavalry and Garrard's Third Kentucky Infantry constituting the advance guard, followed by the siege guns, Foster's battery, and De Courcy3s brigade; next the brigade of Baird, with Wetmore's battery. Carter's brigade and Lanphere's battery brought up the rear. Heavy fatigue parties were constantly employed in front in making and repairing roads, which were again blockaded by Captain Lyon after the rear guard had passed. It was amusing to witness th
, displayed through-)ut the entire march skill and ability of a high order, and removed blockades and made roads for the passage of the other troops. On the 9th instant I directed General Spears to clear the blockade from the Big Creek Gap, and to advance by the Valley road to join me at Rogers' Gap. On the 10th instant I inst expedition was undertaken, but was not successful, as Loudon was occupied by two regiments of the enemy. However, the party fell back without loss. On the 9th instant I received at Lambdin's a telegram from Major-General Buell, informing me that Negley was fully employed in Middle Tennessee and could give me no assistance; thing directions as to the destruction of the railroad bridges at Strawberry Plains and Mossy Creek, I received the second telegram of General Buell, dated on the 9th instant, as also that of the date of the 10th instant. It had been my intention to have advanced against Cumberland Gap on the following day with the brigades of Spear
narrow mountain roads were cut into gullies by the brigades which had already gone forward, and there might have been a descent from Cumberland Gap. On the 10th instant the brigades of De Courcy and Baird encamped on the north side of the Cumberland Mountains, and on the following day, after well-conducted marches, they descenOn the 9th instant I directed General Spears to clear the blockade from the Big Creek Gap, and to advance by the Valley road to join me at Rogers' Gap. On the 10th instant I instructed him to send a party of 200 men under a cool-headed and daring officer to burn the railroad bridge over the Tennessee at Loudon. The expedition wailroad bridges at Strawberry Plains and Mossy Creek, I received the second telegram of General Buell, dated on the 9th instant, as also that of the date of the 10th instant. It had been my intention to have advanced against Cumberland Gap on the following day with the brigades of Spears, Baird, and De Courcy, but I no longer felt
nd mainly on my own resources. I replied that it was too late to change my plans; that my advance guard was already at the foot of the Cumberland Mountains, and that a bold and determined policy on my part was the only prudent one. On the 11th instant I descended the south side of the Cumberland Mountains with De Courcy's advance guard. The entire day and the day following were occupied in making the passage of the mountain ridge-miscalled a gap --and at dark on the night of the 12th instace of the narrow road being blocked up by the 30-pounders, which had not yet descended the mountain) saying that there was a rumor that the enemy was evacuating Cumberland Gap. I also received a telegram from Major-General Buell, dated on the 11th instant at his headquarters, beyond Corinth, stating that Mitchel was instructed as far as possible to threaten Chattanooga, but that I would have to depend mainly upon my own ability to beat the force opposed to me. Acting upon this information and
depend mainly on my own resources. I replied that it was too late to change my plans; that my advance guard was already at the foot of the Cumberland Mountains, and that a bold and determined policy on my part was the only prudent one. On the 11th instant I descended the south side of the Cumberland Mountains with De Courcy's advance guard. The entire day and the day following were occupied in making the passage of the mountain ridge-miscalled a gap --and at dark on the night of the 12th instant some of the cannon had not yet reached the summit of the mountain. On that night, while in the act of giving directions as to the destruction of the railroad bridges at Strawberry Plains and Mossy Creek, I received the second telegram of General Buell, dated on the 9th instant, as also that of the date of the 10th instant. It had been my intention to have advanced against Cumberland Gap on the following day with the brigades of Spears, Baird, and De Courcy, but I no longer felt at liber
a half party just returned. On yesterday there was a brisk skirmish, in which we had 4 wounded. The enemy's killed and wounded were carried from the field, with the exception of 1 wounded man, whom they failed to remove. One of the enemy was mortally wounded while attempting to do so. The enemy has greatly strengthened his position, and has fourteen works on this side of the mountain. According to the prisoners, whose statements are confirmed by three deserters from Knoxville? on the 28th instant two additional regiments of infantry and 300 Indians re-enforced Cumberland Gap. Kirby Smith is said to have returned to Knoxville, where he is represented to have 5,000 men. My effective force are under 8,000-1,400 of whom are not yet armed. The reconnaissance was conducted by Acting Brigadier-General Carter and Colonel De Courcy. George W. Morgan, Brigadier-General Volunteers. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. headquarters, Cumberland Ford, June 7, 1862. The followin
March 28th (search for this): chapter 14
March 28-June 18, 1862.-Cumberland Gap (Tenn.) campaign. Events. Mar. 28, 1862.-Brig. Gen. George W. Morgan, U. S. Army, assigned to command of Seventh Division, Army of the Ohio, and ordered to operate against Cumberland Gsp. April 29, 1862.-skirmish near Cumberland Gap. June 10, 1862.-skirmish at Wilson's Gap.-skirmish at Rogers' Gap. June 11-12, 1862.-skirmishes in Big Creek Gap June 15, 1862.-action at Big Creek Gap. June 18, 1862.-skirmish at Wilson's Gap.--Cumberland Gaer and every soldier has nobly discharged his duty. George W. Morgan, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. Hdqrs. Seventh Division, Army of the Ohio, Cumberland Gap, June 22, 1862. Colonel: On the 28th of March last I was assigned by Major. General Buell to the command of this division, and directed to concentrate my force at Cumberland Ford and to take Cumberland Gap. At that time the roads leading from Crab Orchard and Mount Vernon to Cumberland
April 11th (search for this): chapter 14
of the Sixteenth Ohio, under the supervision of Colonel De Courcy, and means were adopted to supply the troops with fresh meat, which some of them had not tasted for several months, and they were threatened with scurvy. Regiments were armed with guns of various calibers, and there was a scarcity of ammunition even for them. A new distribution of arms was made; worthless ones were replaced by effective weapons, and a supply of ammunition was obtained. I reached Cumberland Ford on the 11th April and made a reconnaissance of the enemy's position at Cumberland Gap. It was evident that the enemy had grouped too many works on their left and depended too much on the natural strength of their right. Six hundred yards to the right of Fort Pitts I observed a knob which commanded that fort and Fort Mallory, and I was satisfied that that hill once in our possession, and occupied by siege guns, the gap was ours. I made a requisition for and obtained two 20 and two 30 pounder Parrott guns,
Gap. June 11-12, 1862.-skirmishes in Big Creek Gap June 15, 1862.-action at Big Creek Gap. June 18, 1862.-skirmish at Wilson's Gap.--Cumberland Gap occupied by Union forces. Reports, etc. No. 1.-Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, U. S. Army, with dispatches relating to Brigadier-General Morgan's report. No. 2.-Brig. Gen. George W. Morgan, U. S. Army, commanding Seventh Division, Army of the Ohio. No. 3.-Capt. Jacob T. Foster, First Wisconsin Battery, Chief of Artillery of operations June 6-18. No. 4.-Brig. Gen. Samuel P. Carter, U. S. Army, commanding Twenty-fourth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 8-16. No. 5.-Brig. Gen. James G. Spears, U. S. Army, commanding Twenty-fifth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 10-15. No. 6.-Col. John F. De Courcy, Sixteenth Ohio Infantry, commanding Twenty-sixth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 7-18. No. 7.-Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird, U. S. Army, commanding Twenty-seventh Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operat
No. 5.-Brig. Gen. James G. Spears, U. S. Army, commanding Twenty-fifth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 10-15. No. 6.-Col. John F. De Courcy, Sixteenth Ohio Infantry, commanding Twenty-sixth Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 7-18. No. 7.-Brig. Gen. Absalom Baird, U. S. Army, commanding Twenty-seventh Brigade, Army of the Ohio, of operations June 7-18. No. 8.-Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army, including orders for movement of troops. No. 9.-J. F. Belton, Acting AsJune 7-18. No. 8.-Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army, including orders for movement of troops. No. 9.-J. F. Belton, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, C. S. Army. No. 1.-report of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell, U. S. Army, with dispatches relating to Brigadier-General Morgan's report. headquarters Army of the Ohio, July 15, 1862. General Morgan has had very great difficulties to contend with, and merits praise for the zeal and ability with which he has conducted his column. I deem it proper to submit the accompanying dispatches between General Morgan and my headquarters in explanation of certain paragraphs
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