hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Farmington (Mississippi, United States) 389 39 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 161 7 Browse Search
John Pope 160 12 Browse Search
Booneville (Mississippi, United States) 146 14 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 141 11 Browse Search
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) 132 12 Browse Search
William Nelson 125 9 Browse Search
Henry W. Halleck 119 7 Browse Search
Purdy (Tennessee, United States) 108 6 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). Search the whole document.

Found 256 total hits in 60 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6
Conyersville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
few scratches were received. The conduct of the command was excellent, with few exceptions. I marched on the 6th 4 miles; on the 7th, having information that a large force was concentrating from several quarters to movo against me, with artillery, I determined to secure my prisoners. I marched to Como at 1 p. m. and fed; marched to within 5 miles of Caledonia and halted. At midnight I got a dispatch from Colonel Pell, who, having joined me from Boydsville, was again sent toward Conyersville, to attack a reported force of 150. At a certain point he obtained some news that the enemy, near 1,000 strong, had encamped at dark 6 miles from Paris, and that they would be joined in the morning by 500 more. I moved at once to cross the Obion before King's Bridge could be seized. (It was the only one.) I encamped last night at McLemoresville, and satisfied myself that the enemy had that morning entered Paris with artillery, foot, and horse, but there he would remain. I left Co
Monterey (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
occupy the country for 30 miles back of the river, and as there are many good and loyal citizens in this vicinity, they should receive all possible assistance and protection. Should the rebels again get possession of this section of the country, it is their intention to take off everything in the way of forage and provisions. I am, sir, your obedient servant, W. W. Lowe, Colonel Curtis' Horse, Commanding. Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Department of the Mississippi, Monterey, Miss. No. 3.-report of Capts. William A. Haw and Henning von Minden, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. the address of this report not known. It was found in the Confederate archives as accompanying document to Colonel Claiborne's report of the affair. See p 879. Spring Creek, Tenn., May 9, 1862. The command started under the command of Major Shaeffer [de Boernstein] (130 men strong), on May 2, toward Paris, where we were delayed until late in the afternoon of the 3d by shoeing the horses.
Paris, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
May 2-9, 1862.-expedition from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Loout 1,250) to attack a force reported to be at Paris, 250 to 500 strong. I separated into three coward Fort Heiman. At about 4 p. m. entered Paris. The enemy had moved at 10 a. m. toward Dresdthat a force of nearly 3,000 was passing up to Paris; he instantly sent off on the fastest horses c,000 strong, had encamped at dark 6 miles from Paris, and that they would be joined in the morning ut recently from this post in the direction of Paris and Dresden for the purpose of intercepting so any satisfactory information, he pushed on to Paris and Dresden. After passing through Paris Claiurn, but sent several parties into and through Paris, without, however, being able to bring out theBoernstein] (130 men strong), on May 2, toward Paris, where we were delayed until late in the afterrain was the reason we started on the 4th from Paris toward Como (13 miles), and passed the night 3[5 more...]
Como (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
aving information that a large force was concentrating from several quarters to movo against me, with artillery, I determined to secure my prisoners. I marched to Como at 1 p. m. and fed; marched to within 5 miles of Caledonia and halted. At midnight I got a dispatch from Colonel Pell, who, having joined me from Boydsville, was toward Paris, where we were delayed until late in the afternoon of the 3d by shoeing the horses. Heavy rain was the reason we started on the 4th from Paris toward Como (13 miles), and passed the night 3 miles farther, at the farm of Mr. Erwin. There a report was made by a citizen coming from Caledonia that a large force of Confeand possibly toward Mayfield and Hickman. We made a night march on a very dark and stormy night, and reached Dresden at about 1 a. m. Pickets were sent out toward Como, which reported (very late) that the enemy had his pickets at our last camping place-Erwin's farm. We left Dresden at 1 p. m., taking the road toward Mayfield,
Fort Heiman (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
at McKenzie's Station, waiting Jackson, who joined me on the 4th, and we marched (whole force about 1,250) to attack a force reported to be at Paris, 250 to 500 strong. I separated into three columns, to surround it and intercept them toward Fort Heiman. At about 4 p. m. entered Paris. The enemy had moved at 10 a. m. toward Dresden. I immediately detached one column, under Lieuten. ant-Colonel Pell, to Boydsville, and with my own joined Colonel Jackson who was on the Dresden road, 2J m Jackson and Major Wicks agree with me, I hope to have your approval of my course. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, th. Claiborne. No. 2.-report of Col. William W. Lowe, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. headquarters, Forts Henry and Heiman, May 12, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report the result of an expedition sent out recently from this post in the direction of Paris and Dresden for the purpose of intercepting some supplies of medicines, &c., taken from Paducah for the use o
Dresden, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
1862.-expedition from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Lockridge's Miaris. The enemy had moved at 10 a. m. toward Dresden. I immediately detached one column, under Li my own joined Colonel Jackson who was on the Dresden road, 2J miles. We pushed on vigorously, conime to let him satisfy himself I was going to Dresden, and I took a by-road through Palmersville to cut the Dresden road to Boydsville. I got at 5 p. m. certain information of him, but not his e from this post in the direction of Paris and Dresden for the purpose of intercepting some suppliesactory information, he pushed on to Paris and Dresden. After passing through Paris Claiborne's comduced Major Shaeffer [de Boernstein] to go to Dresden and possibly toward Mayfield and Hickman. We on a very dark and stormy night, and reached Dresden at about 1 a. m. Pickets were sent out toward last camping place-Erwin's farm. We left Dresden at 1 p. m., taking the road toward Mayfield,
King's Bridge (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
am A. Haw and Henning von Minden, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. No. 1.-report of Col. Thomas Claiborne, Sixth Confederate Cavalry. Spring Creek, Tenn., May 9, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report that I left Trenton on May 2 and encamped at King's Bridge. On the 3d encamped at McKenzie's Station, waiting Jackson, who joined me on the 4th, and we marched (whole force about 1,250) to attack a force reported to be at Paris, 250 to 500 strong. I separated into three columns, to surround it and reported force of 150. At a certain point he obtained some news that the enemy, near 1,000 strong, had encamped at dark 6 miles from Paris, and that they would be joined in the morning by 500 more. I moved at once to cross the Obion before King's Bridge could be seized. (It was the only one.) I encamped last night at McLemoresville, and satisfied myself that the enemy had that morning entered Paris with artillery, foot, and horse, but there he would remain. I left Colonel Pell at or n
McKenzie (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
ed force of 150. At a certain point he obtained some news that the enemy, near 1,000 strong, had encamped at dark 6 miles from Paris, and that they would be joined in the morning by 500 more. I moved at once to cross the Obion before King's Bridge could be seized. (It was the only one.) I encamped last night at McLemoresville, and satisfied myself that the enemy had that morning entered Paris with artillery, foot, and horse, but there he would remain. I left Colonel Pell at or near McKenzie, with orders to observe the enemy and keep posted as to his movements, and to-day, leaving orders for Pell to take a position between McLemoresville and Huntingdon and keep me informed, I moved to this place, my horses very jaded, my men having suffered for food, having no means to prepare nor haversacks to carry with them food for a day even. We subsisted with great difficulty and by getting people for miles around to cook for us. It is well to add that the person — an Englishman, of
Mayfield (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
er, at the farm of Mr. Erwin. There a report was made by a citizen coming from Caledonia that a large force of Confederate cavalry had passed, going toward Paris, which induced Major Shaeffer [de Boernstein] to go to Dresden and possibly toward Mayfield and Hickman. We made a night march on a very dark and stormy night, and reached Dresden at about 1 a. m. Pickets were sent out toward Como, which reported (very late) that the enemy had his pickets at our last camping place-Erwin's farm. We left Dresden at 1 p. m., taking the road toward Mayfield, 28 miles. It was about 6 p. m. when we reached a place called Lockridge Mills, on the Obion River, in Weakley County, Tenn., where a bridge (the North Fork) crosses the said river. Major Shaeffer [de Boernstein] concluded to stop there for the night. I took the picket with my men (45), established three lines of them, because I was fully satisfied that we would be attacked, and knowing that we could not resist the expected force, I int
Trenton, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 40
May 2-9, 1862.-expedition from Trenton to Paris and Dresden, Tenn., with skirmish, May 5, near Lockridge's Mill. Reports. No. 1.-Col. Thomas Claiborne, Sixth Confederate Cavalry. No. 2.-Col. William W. Lowe, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. No. 3.-Capts. William A. Haw and Henning von Minden, Fifth Iowa Cavalry. No. 1.-report of Col. Thomas Claiborne, Sixth Confederate Cavalry. Spring Creek, Tenn., May 9, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report that I left Trenton on May 2 and encamped at King's Bridge. On the 3d encamped at McKenzie's Station, waiting Jackson, who joined me on the 4th, and we marched (whole force about 1,250) to attack a force reported to be at Paris, 250 to 500 strong. I separated into three columns, to surround it and intercept them toward Fort Heiman. At about 4 p. m. entered Paris. The enemy had moved at 10 a. m. toward Dresden. I immediately detached one column, under Lieuten. ant-Colonel Pell, to Boydsville, and with my own joined Colonel Jacks
1 2 3 4 5 6