hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Farmington (Mississippi, United States) 389 39 Browse Search
G. T. Beauregard 161 7 Browse Search
John Pope 160 12 Browse Search
Booneville (Mississippi, United States) 146 14 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 141 11 Browse Search
Pittsburg Landing (Tennessee, United States) 132 12 Browse Search
William Nelson 125 9 Browse Search
Henry W. Halleck 119 7 Browse Search
Purdy (Tennessee, United States) 108 6 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). Search the whole document.

Found 83 total hits in 34 results.

1 2 3 4
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
District of Tennessee, Knoxville, March 15, 1862. General: I have the honor to report that the enemy, having passed the Cumberland Mountains, yesterday surprised and captured, without the fire of a gun, I believe, the larger number of two companies of the First East Tennessee Cavalry near Jacksborough. Their force consisted of a regiment of infantry. Couriers who arrived last night bring the intelligence that they are moving in this direction. I have ordered forward to Clinton two Alabama regiments, the Third Regiment Tennessee Volunteers, a battalion of North Carolina Volunteers a section (two pieces) Third Maryland Artillery, and a portion First East Tennessee Cavalry (an aggregate of 2,000 men), the whole under the command of Col. D. Leadbetter, who has received such instructions from me as I thought necessary for the exigency. From what I have learned of the character of the troops from East Tennessee in our service, of their strong Union proclivities, greatly increa
Knoxville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ived an order from you to report at headquarters with my command at the earliest possible moment. I accordingly took up the line of march for this place on the 20th instant, and arrived here on the 23d instant without the loss of a single man. Your obedient servant, Jas. P. T. Carter Colonel Second Bast Tennessee Volunteers. Acting Brigadier-General Carter, Comdg. Twelfth Brigade. No. 2.-report of Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army. headquarters District of Tennessee, Knoxville, March 15, 1862. General: I have the honor to report that the enemy, having passed the Cumberland Mountains, yesterday surprised and captured, without the fire of a gun, I believe, the larger number of two companies of the First East Tennessee Cavalry near Jacksborough. Their force consisted of a regiment of infantry. Couriers who arrived last night bring the intelligence that they are moving in this direction. I have ordered forward to Clinton two Alabama regiments, the Third Reg
Jacksborough (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
d the troops been able to get up in time I am satisfied that we could have succeeded in capturing the whole force. On the arrival of the cavalry we marched to Jacksborough, distance 5 miles, and there overtook the rear guard of the cavalry; killed 1 man and captured Capt. Edward Winston, of the Corps of Sappers and Miners. We ho Mountains, yesterday surprised and captured, without the fire of a gun, I believe, the larger number of two companies of the First East Tennessee Cavalry near Jacksborough. Their force consisted of a regiment of infantry. Couriers who arrived last night bring the intelligence that they are moving in this direction. I have onear relationship to and from intimate association with many citizens who have fled the country and espoused the Federal cause, I am satisfied the capture near Jacksborough was the result of treachery. Pickets detailed from them cannot be relied on and even officers are not free from suspicion of more fidelity to the Federal than
Jacksboro (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
March 14, 1862.-skirmishes at Big Creek Gap and Jacksborough, Tenn. Reports. No. 1.-Col. James P. T. Carter, Second East Tennessee Infantry, U. S. Army. No. 2.-Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army. No. 1.-report of Col. James P. T. Carter, Second East Tennessee Infantry, U. S. Army. Hdqrs. Second East Tennessee Volunteers, Camp at Flat Lick, March 23, 1862. General: In obedience to your order of the 8th instant to proceed to Big Creek Gap and Jacksborough, Campbell County, TJacksborough, Campbell County, Tennessee, and capture or rout the rebel forces which were reported to be in that vicinity blockading roads and molesting the persons and property of Union citizens, I left with my command on the morning of the 10th instant, accompanied by Lieut. Col. James Keigwin, of the Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, and marched to Big Creek Gap via Boston. My force consisted of the Second East Tennessee Regiment; Company A, of the First East Tennessee Regiment, Captain Cooper; Company B, of the Forty-ninth
Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
ple through the section of country over which we passed are truly loyal in their sentiments and hailed the advent of our troops with unbounded enthusiasm. Everything they had was freely tendered to us. We found forage and provisions abundant on the route after we left Boston. The position we had at Woodson's Gap was a very strong one, and could have been held against a large force, and had we been permitted to remain we would no doubt have had an opportunity of meeting the forces at Cumberland Gap which had been sent out to attack us, but on the 19th instant I received an order from you to report at headquarters with my command at the earliest possible moment. I accordingly took up the line of march for this place on the 20th instant, and arrived here on the 23d instant without the loss of a single man. Your obedient servant, Jas. P. T. Carter Colonel Second Bast Tennessee Volunteers. Acting Brigadier-General Carter, Comdg. Twelfth Brigade. No. 2.-report of Maj. Gen
Clinton (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
headquarters District of Tennessee, Knoxville, March 15, 1862. General: I have the honor to report that the enemy, having passed the Cumberland Mountains, yesterday surprised and captured, without the fire of a gun, I believe, the larger number of two companies of the First East Tennessee Cavalry near Jacksborough. Their force consisted of a regiment of infantry. Couriers who arrived last night bring the intelligence that they are moving in this direction. I have ordered forward to Clinton two Alabama regiments, the Third Regiment Tennessee Volunteers, a battalion of North Carolina Volunteers a section (two pieces) Third Maryland Artillery, and a portion First East Tennessee Cavalry (an aggregate of 2,000 men), the whole under the command of Col. D. Leadbetter, who has received such instructions from me as I thought necessary for the exigency. From what I have learned of the character of the troops from East Tennessee in our service, of their strong Union proclivities, gr
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
essee Cavalry (an aggregate of 2,000 men), the whole under the command of Col. D. Leadbetter, who has received such instructions from me as I thought necessary for the exigency. From what I have learned of the character of the troops from East Tennessee in our service, of their strong Union proclivities, greatly increased by their near relationship to and from intimate association with many citizens who have fled the country and espoused the Federal cause, I am satisfied the capture near Jacong them of that confidence in the loyalty of each other which would make them faithful in the discharge of their duty to their fellow soldiers and to the country, and this is aggravated, too, by the opinion, which exists to some extent, that East Tennessee cannot be defended by thA force we have in the field, and must be abandoned upon the advance of the Federal Army. I cannot, therefore, too strongly urge upon the Department the propriety, if not the necessity, of removing these troops to
Flat Lick, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
March 14, 1862.-skirmishes at Big Creek Gap and Jacksborough, Tenn. Reports. No. 1.-Col. James P. T. Carter, Second East Tennessee Infantry, U. S. Army. No. 2.-Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army. No. 1.-report of Col. James P. T. Carter, Second East Tennessee Infantry, U. S. Army. Hdqrs. Second East Tennessee Volunteers, Camp at Flat Lick, March 23, 1862. General: In obedience to your order of the 8th instant to proceed to Big Creek Gap and Jacksborough, Campbell County, Tennessee, and capture or rout the rebel forces which were reported to be in that vicinity blockading roads and molesting the persons and property of Union citizens, I left with my command on the morning of the 10th instant, accompanied by Lieut. Col. James Keigwin, of the Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, and marched to Big Creek Gap via Boston. My force consisted of the Second East Tennessee Regiment; Company A, of the First East Tennessee Regiment, Captain Cooper; Company B, of the Forty-ninth
Big Creek Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
March 14, 1862.-skirmishes at Big Creek Gap and Jacksborough, Tenn. Reports. No. 1.-Col. James P. T. Carter, Second East Tennessee Infantry, U. S. Army. No. 2.-Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army. No. 1.-report of Col. James P. T. Carteolunteers, Camp at Flat Lick, March 23, 1862. General: In obedience to your order of the 8th instant to proceed to Big Creek Gap and Jacksborough, Campbell County, Tennessee, and capture or rout the rebel forces which were reported to be in that of the 10th instant, accompanied by Lieut. Col. James Keigwin, of the Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, and marched to Big Creek Gap via Boston. My force consisted of the Second East Tennessee Regiment; Company A, of the First East Tennessee Regimen, at 6 o'clock p. m. I then learned that two companies of the First Tennessee Regiment rebel cavalry were encamped at Big Creek Gap. Finding the road completely blockaded, I detached the cavalry, and sent them around by another road, with orders to
Fincastle (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 7
he impassability of the roads the cavalry did not arrive till after the skirmish. Had the troops been able to get up in time I am satisfied that we could have succeeded in capturing the whole force. On the arrival of the cavalry we marched to Jacksborough, distance 5 miles, and there overtook the rear guard of the cavalry; killed 1 man and captured Capt. Edward Winston, of the Corps of Sappers and Miners. We hoisted the Stars and Stripes over the town, and on the 15th instant marched to Fincastle, and from thence to Woodson's Gap, where we encamped a few days. Learning that there was a manufactory of saltpeter in the neighborhood, I sent a detachment of cavalry with orders to destroy the same. They destroyed about 1,000 pounds of saltpeter, broke up the kettles, burned up the shed, and destroyed about 11,000 pounds of bacon and 20 sacks of flour. Our loss was 1 wounded-Lieutenant Myers, Company H, Second East Tennessee Volunteers. His wound, however, is not dangerous. Of
1 2 3 4