hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
U. S. Grant 558 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 439 3 Browse Search
Sherman 111 11 Browse Search
Andrew Johnson 90 4 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 86 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 76 4 Browse Search
Halleck 67 13 Browse Search
Lee 64 0 Browse Search
E. M. Stanton 64 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 60 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil.. Search the whole document.

Found 281 total hits in 50 results.

1 2 3 4 5
Tunstall (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
tted that he had! The newspaper account, of course, did not fail to color the picture to Grant's disadvantage. This story was published to gratify the vulgar hatred of Mr. Johnson, and with the hope of alarming the Republican party, and so damaging the general's reputation that the people would not accept him as a candidate for the Presidency. It was intended also to divert attention from Mr. Johnson's own guilty purposes. So mean a game was never before played by an occupant of the White House, nor indeed by any politician of respectability and position. But it did not succeed. General Grant, whose conduct through all his career had been straightforward, honest, and obedient to law, could not in decency submit to the imputations authorized by a President of the United States, although he was a man in whom, notwithstanding his high office, the country had learned to put little confidence. He addressed to the President the following letter, which palpably states the truth:--
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
divided into five military districts, each to be commanded by a major-general. These officers were selected by Grant, though appointed to those places by the President, and in making the selection he took those whom he knew to be faithful to the policy on which the rebellion had been suppressed, and opposed to the restoration of rebels to power. Schofield, Sickles, Thomas, Ord, and Sheridan were the officers appointed to the several districts; but Thomas, desiring to remain in command in Kentucky and Tennessee, Pope was designated in his place. The authority of these commanders was great, but their acts were subject to the approval or disapproval of General Grant, who thus had the responsibility of the execution of the laws and the exercise of military power in the rebel states, so far as such responsibility could be separated from the President. It was necessary that this should be done in order to remove impediments to reconstruction, and to restrain the greatest of all impedime
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
of its adjournment. Whether the assembly was by proper authority or not, there was no justification for the bloody opposition manifested by the rebels, with Mayor Monroe and some of the state officials at their head. But the support and encouragement which they received from the President led them to commit the outrages and murders by which loyal men, white and black, were assailed, hunted down, and killed. General Sheridan, who commanded the department, and who was absent at the time in Texas, was not disposed to tolerate the rule of that rebellious spirit which he had fought for four years to conquer. He investigated the affair, and reported the atrocious spirit and acts of the rebels, and acting under the instructions of General Grant, he took measures for the protection of loyal men, and watched the schemes of these still malignant rebels. He was sustained and strengthened by Grant, although the rebels appealed to the President, and received all the aid and comfort he dared
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
should be used to give éclat to the President's political tour, and be placed in a false light before the country; and he was disgusted with that functionary's vulgar manners and malignant speeches. He determined that he would no longer be subject to the imputation of opposing Congress and the will of the loyal people, and that he would not again be caught in such unworthy company. While the President, the next year, was on his tour to Boston, Grant returned to Washington from a visit to West Point. On the cars he met some ladies, who remarked upon his not being one of the President's party. I was not invited, said the general, dryly, and had I been, I should not have accepted the invitation. When Congress assumed the prerogative which belonged to it, and prescribed the terms and conditions on which the rebel states might be restored to their relations with the Union; when it saw the necessity of affording protection to the freedmen against the oppression and outrages of their l
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
five military districts, each to be commanded by a major-general. These officers were selected by Grant, though appointed to those places by the President, and in making the selection he took those whom he knew to be faithful to the policy on which the rebellion had been suppressed, and opposed to the restoration of rebels to power. Schofield, Sickles, Thomas, Ord, and Sheridan were the officers appointed to the several districts; but Thomas, desiring to remain in command in Kentucky and Tennessee, Pope was designated in his place. The authority of these commanders was great, but their acts were subject to the approval or disapproval of General Grant, who thus had the responsibility of the execution of the laws and the exercise of military power in the rebel states, so far as such responsibility could be separated from the President. It was necessary that this should be done in order to remove impediments to reconstruction, and to restrain the greatest of all impediments, Andrew J
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
nding my position, namely, that if the Senate refused to concur in the suspension of Mr. Stanton, my powers as Secretary of War ad interim would cease, and Mr. Stanton's right to resume at once the functions of his office would under the law be indisputable, and I acted accordingly. With Mr. Stanton I had no communication, direct nor indirect, on the subject of his reinstatement, during his suspension. I knew it had been recommended to the President to send in the name of Governor Cox, of Ohio, for Secretary of War, and thus save all embarrassment — a proposition that I sincerely hoped he would entertain favorably; General Sherman seeing the President at my particular request to urge this, on the 13th instant. On Tuesday (the day Mr. Stanton reentered the office of the Secretary of War) General Comstock, who had carried my official letter announcing that, with Mr. Stanton's reinstatement by the Senate, I had ceased to be Secretary of War ad interim, and who saw the President ope
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s faithfully performed. His headquarters were at Washington, where some of the citizens of the North, in gratear, was on his tour to Boston, Grant returned to Washington from a visit to West Point. On the cars he met srsations with the unsubmissive rebels who went to Washington to misrepresent the condition of southern affairsf the army should always have his headquarters at Washington, that he should not be ordered elsewhere, nor be headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., August 1, 1867. Sir: I take the liberty of headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., August 17, 1867. . . . . . . I am pleased said to have contemplated. His very presence at Washington, as commander of the army, has been the safety of- headquarters army of the United States, Washington, D. C., January 28, 1868. Sir: On the 24th instant- headquarters army of the United States, Washington, D. C., February 3, 1868. Sir: I have the honor to
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
st independence. headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., August 1, 1867. Sir: I tan the liberty of addressing the Executive of the United States thus but for the conversation on the subject allral. his Excellency A. Johnson, President of the United States. But neither reason nor the patriotic appealt as follows :-- headquarters armies of the United States, Washington, D. C., August 17, 1867. . . . . t, Your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, General U. S. A., Secretary of War ad interim. his Excellency A. Johnson, President of the United States. The President, however, persisted in his encouragement to the unrefothe imputations authorized by a President of the United States, although he was a man in whom, notwithstanding ral. his Excellency A. Johnson, President of the United States. Mr. Johnson replied, repeating what he had ral. his Excellency A. Johnson, President of the United States. The President reiterated his version of the
protest. Johnson's obstinacy. Grant Secretary of war ad interim. his rare administrative powers. removal of Sheridan. another protest. removal of Sickles and Pope. Grant the defender of congressional policy. Johnson's little game. he misrepresents Grant. Grant's letter to the President. Johnson's vulgar hatred. he maield, Sickles, Thomas, Ord, and Sheridan were the officers appointed to the several districts; but Thomas, desiring to remain in command in Kentucky and Tennessee, Pope was designated in his place. The authority of these commanders was great, but their acts were subject to the approval or disapproval of General Grant, who thus ha Sheridan, carried out the reconstruction acts in the interest of loyalty, and General Canby was ordered to succeed him. And subsequently, for similar reasons, General Pope was removed, and General Meade assigned as his successor. In making these changes, except so far as his petty ill will was gratified, Mr. Johnson must have be
owds, whose cheers the President was conceited enough to imagine were tributes to himself. But on more than one occasion it was made evident that the crowd came to cheer Grant and Farragut, and not Johnson,--the heroes who had conquered the rebels, and not the renegade who sought to restore them to power. Grant modestly acknowledged the honors offered him, but made no speeches, knowing that silence, after Johnson's tirades, was more eloquent and becoming than words. Notwithstanding Secretary Seward's repeated insinuations that Grant supported and approved Johnson's policy, and his declaration that General Grant cannot not be separated from the President, the general improved the first favorable opportunity to leave the party. He had no taste for shows ; he was indignant that he should be used to give éclat to the President's political tour, and be placed in a false light before the country; and he was disgusted with that functionary's vulgar manners and malignant speeches. He de
1 2 3 4 5