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and his direct communications with the Louisiana rebels, encouraged them to the most bitter opposition to the loyal element in that state, and caused the New Orleans riot of August, 1866, when they wantonly attacked the members of the State Convention, which had previously framed a constitution, and reassembled according to the terms of its adjournment. Whether the assembly was by proper authority or not, there was no justification for the bloody opposition manifested by the rebels, with Mayor Monroe and some of the state officials at their head. But the support and encouragement which they received from the President led them to commit the outrages and murders by which loyal men, white and black, were assailed, hunted down, and killed. General Sheridan, who commanded the department, and who was absent at the time in Texas, was not disposed to tolerate the rule of that rebellious spirit which he had fought for four years to conquer. He investigated the affair, and reported the atro
ate had taken up the subject of Mr. Stanton's suspension, after some conversation with Lieutenant General Sherman and some members of my staff, in which I stated that the law left me no discretion as save all embarrassment — a proposition that I sincerely hoped he would entertain favorably; General Sherman seeing the President at my particular request to urge this, on the 13th instant. On Tues the country, and not the office, the latter desired. On the 15th ultimo, in presence of General Sherman, I stated to you that I thought Mr. Stanton would resign, but did not say that I would advise him to do so. On the 18th I did agree with General Sherman to go and advise him to that course, and on the 19th I had an interview alone with Mr. Stanton, which led me to the conclusion that any advice to him of the kind would be useless, and I so informed General Sherman. Before I consented to advise Mr. Stanton to resign, I understood from him, in a conversation on the subject immediatel
A. Johnson (search for this): chapter 10
lar reasons, General Pope was removed, and General Meade assigned as his successor. In making these changes, except so far as his petty ill will was gratified, Mr. Johnson must have been disappointed. For all the new commanders, except Hancock, honestly and faithfully administered the reconstruction laws in accordance with their e. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, General. his Excellency A. Johnson, President of the United States. Mr. Johnson replied, repeating what he had before published through newspapers hostile to Grant and Congress, and adding that four members of the cabinet concurred in the g But it is significant, that of these indorsers of presidential veracity, those who are of the least political consequence, and the most obsequious followers of Mr. Johnson, give the briefest and most emphatic certificates of his correctness; while those who chose to exercise their own memory, though they do not contradict the Pres
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 10
y. Johnson's little game. he misrepresents Grant. Grant's letter to the President. Johnson's Consequences to Johnson. contrast between Grant and Johnson. The return of peace imposed neting a spirit no better than rebellion. General Grant had occasion to issue orders for the supprbels, and acting under the instructions of General Grant, he took measures for the protection of lo rebels. He was sustained and strengthened by Grant, although the rebels appealed to the Presidentajor-general. These officers were selected by Grant, though appointed to those places by the Presipolicy of obstruction, hoped also to place General Grant in a false position, as the instrument of spending Secretary Stanton, and appointing General Grant Secretary of War ad interim. The general af course, did not fail to color the picture to Grant's disadvantage. This story was published toof the affair, with the further charge against Grant of insubordination; and he undertook to substa[49 more...]
Andrew Johnson (search for this): chapter 10
New Orleans riot. Grant and Sheridan. President Johnson's tour. Grant's company ordered. his rrouble. intrusted with extraordinary power. Johnson's hostility. removal of Stanton. Grant's protest. Johnson's obstinacy. Grant Secretary of war ad interim. his rare administrative powers. f this rebellious spirit which grew out of Andrew Johnson's policy, and he became convinced that he restrain the greatest of all impediments, Andrew Johnson, from thwarting the will of the people as could find any. Regardless, however, of Mr. Johnson's ill temper, Grant quietly performed his drtily approved by the general. In this way Mr. Johnson, while carrying out his policy of obstructint servant, U. S. Grant, General. his Excellency A. Johnson, President of the United States. BPresident of the fact, vacated the office. Mr. Johnson, baffled and angry, made known through some was intended also to divert attention from Mr. Johnson's own guilty purposes. So mean a game was [32 more...]
Edwin M. Stanton (search for this): chapter 10
of the reconstruction acts. Grant's firmness and support of the authority of Congress. Johnson's anger. the General's duties faithfully performed. he anticipates trouble. intrusted with extraordinary power. Johnson's hostility. removal of Stanton. Grant's protest. Johnson's obstinacy. Grant Secretary of war ad interim. his rare administrative powers. removal of Sheridan. another protest. removal of Sickles and Pope. Grant the defender of congressional policy. Johnson's little ga:-- headquarters army of the United States, Washington, D. C., January 28, 1868. Sir: On the 24th instant, I requested you to give me in writing the instructions which you had previously given me verbally, not to obey any order from Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War, unless I knew that it came from yourself. To this written request I received a message that has left doubt in my mind of your intentions. To prevent any possible misunderstanding, therefore, I renew the request that you
. Grant's protest. Johnson's obstinacy. Grant Secretary of war ad interim. his rare administrative powers. removal of Sheridan. another protest. removal of Sickles and Pope. Grant the defender of congressional policy. Johnson's little game. he misrepresents Grant. Grant's letter to the President. Johnson's vulgar hatrhe took those whom he knew to be faithful to the policy on which the rebellion had been suppressed, and opposed to the restoration of rebels to power. Schofield, Sickles, Thomas, Ord, and Sheridan were the officers appointed to the several districts; but Thomas, desiring to remain in command in Kentucky and Tennessee, Pope was deseneral Sheridan, and as General Thomas's health would not justify his being sent to New Orleans, General Hancock was appointed in his place. On the, same day General Sickles was removed, because he, like Sheridan, carried out the reconstruction acts in the interest of loyalty, and General Canby was ordered to succeed him. And subs
law be indisputable, and I acted accordingly. With Mr. Stanton I had no communication, direct nor indirect, on the subject of his reinstatement, during his suspension. I knew it had been recommended to the President to send in the name of Governor Cox, of Ohio, for Secretary of War, and thus save all embarrassment — a proposition that I sincerely hoped he would entertain favorably; General Sherman seeing the President at my particular request to urge this, on the 13th instant. On Tuesdaysumptions in your communication plainly indicate was sought. And it was to avoid this same danger, as well as to relieve you from the personal embarrassment in which Mr. Stanton's reinstatement would place you, that I urged the appointment of Governor Cox, believing that it would be agreeable to you and also to Mr. Stanton--satisfied, as I was, that it was the good of the country, and not the office, the latter desired. On the 15th ultimo, in presence of General Sherman, I stated to you that
his rare administrative powers. removal of Sheridan. another protest. removal of Sickles and Po were assailed, hunted down, and killed. General Sheridan, who commanded the department, and who wal the aid and comfort he dared to give them. Sheridan's firm and loyal conduct gave great satisfact power. Schofield, Sickles, Thomas, Ord, and Sheridan were the officers appointed to the several din to do as much against an armed enemy as General Sheridan did during the rebellion, and it is withie, by issuing an order for the removal of General Sheridan from the command of the fifth military di I beg that their voice may be heard. General Sheridan has performed his civil duties faithfullyd especially to being assigned to relieve General Sheridan. There are military reasons, pecuniaryment to the unreformed rebels by removing General Sheridan, and as General Thomas's health would notGeneral Sickles was removed, because he, like Sheridan, carried out the reconstruction acts in the i[2 more...]
. The President, however, persisted in his encouragement to the unreformed rebels by removing General Sheridan, and as General Thomas's health would not justify his being sent to New Orleans, General Hancock was appointed in his place. On the, same day General Sickles was removed, because he, like Sheridan, carried out the reconstruction acts in the interest of loyalty, and General Canby was ordered to succeed him. And subsequently, for similar reasons, General Pope was removed, and General Meade assigned as his successor. In making these changes, except so far as his petty ill will was gratified, Mr. Johnson must have been disappointed. For all the new commanders, except Hancock, honestly and faithfully administered the reconstruction laws in accordance with their plain intent and meaning, and with the general instructions of Grant; and though Hancock was in some way demoralized, and became, perhaps unwittingly, the tool of the President in fostering the rebel element in New O
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