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it — of which you, your State, and your country may not be proud. I congratulate you on the patriotism that so many of you have evinced in your desire to re-enter the service. I hope, I pray, and I know that your future career will be as glorious as your past. I have one other hope; and that is that we may yet servo together some day again. Loud cheers followed the conclusion of this speech, and officers and men cried out, We'll follow you anywhere, general! After a speech from Major Harkins, General McClellan took leave with a few words of farewell, the soldiers cheering and crowding round him as he went out of the room. General McClellan has recently appeared before the public, with much honor to himself, in a literary capacity. In the autumn of 1863, the officers of the army stationed at West Point formed an association for erecting at that post a monument in commemoration of such officers of the regular army as shall have fallen in the service during the present war.
Charles J. Ingersoll (search for this): chapter 12
s deemed by the friends of Judge Woodward highly important that this erroneous impression should be removed by a distinct contradiction under General McClellan's own hand. Accordingly, one of Judge Woodward's friends left Philadelphia on Sunday evening, October 11,--the day of the election being Tuesday, October 13,--and went to Orange, New Jersey, and laid the whole matter before General McClellan. The result was the following letter:-- Orange, New Jersey, October 12, 1863. Hon. Charles J. Ingersoll, Philadelphia. dear Sir:--My attention has been called to an article in the Philadelphia Press, asserting that I had written to the managers of a Democratic meeting at Allentown, disapproving the objects of the meeting, and that, if I voted or spoke, it would be in favor of Governor Curtin. I am informed that similar assertions have been made throughout the State. It has been my earnest endeavor heretofore to avoid participating in party politics, and I am determined to adhere
speeches, not as a politician, but as a soldier. I came among you to seek quiet and repose, and from the moment I came among you I have received nothing but kindness; and, although I came among you a stranger, I am well acquainted with your history. From the time I took command, your gallant sons were with me, from the siege of Yorktown to the battle of Antietam. I was with them, and witnessed their bravery, and that of the ever-faithful and ever-true Taylor and the intrepid and dashing Kearney. One word more. While the army is fighting, you, as citizens, should see that the war is prosecuted for the preservation of the Union and the Constitution, for your nationality and rights as citizens. Since the time of his removal from the command of the Army of the Potomac, General McClellan has not had any military duties assigned to him, but has been living, unemployed, the life of a private citizen. At this moment of writing (July, 1864), he resides at Orange, in the State of New
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 12
y letter of the 28th, above referred to, General McClellan disapproved of the plan of crossing the than six despatches addressed to him by General McClellan after October 26. General McClellan'sa special messenger, who delivered it to General McClellan at Rectortown on the 7th. Here it wis will be received as the real cause why General McClellan was deprived of his command. Had this bpon a point of such vital moment. But General McClellan's political opinions, and his manly avowntry and the nationality of its people. George B. Mcclellan, Major-General, U. S. A. On Saturdaclock on the evening of Sunday, the 9th, General McClellan took leave of his staff officers by appoht have done had it appeared earlier. General McClellan must have been flattered by the amount a of the First New York Cavalry, at which General McClellan, under whom they had served, was present have no doubt he will speak to you. General McClellan replied, as follows:-- my friends and[36 more...]
George Brinton McClellan (search for this): chapter 12
our opinions entirely agree on these points, I would, were it in my power, give to Judge Woodward my voice and my vote. I am, very respectfully, yours, George B. McClellan. The above letter was immediately telegraphed to Philadelphia, but it was not published till late in the afternoon of Monday, the 12th, and then it wase honor, and the great pleasure, to announce to you that the noble chieftain who led the Army of tho Potomac on that occasion, that matchless chieftain, General George B. McClellan--[cheers lasting several minutes],--I do not blame you for your enthusiasm,--General George B. McClellan, has honored you with his presence. If you wilGeneral George B. McClellan, has honored you with his presence. If you will keep still for a moment, I have no doubt he will speak to you. General McClellan replied, as follows:-- my friends and comrades:--I came here not to make a speech to you, but to welcome you home, and express to you the pride I have always felt in watching your career, not only when you were with me, but since I left the Ar
I. McDowell (search for this): chapter 12
m, afford no justification for his removal from the command of the army. He had shown by word and deed that he would do his duty as a soldier, within his sphere, whatever political policy the Administration might adopt or whatever political aspects the war might assume. This was all the Administration had a right to ask. That he had the confidence and affection of his army is beyond question. His removal was due to a fact stated affirmatively — though put in the form of a question to General McDowell--by a member of the Congressional Committee on the Conduct of the War, December 26, 1861,--that there is a political element connected with this war which must not be overlooked. There has indeed been such an element from the beginning in the conduct of this war; it never has, been overlooked, but has always been prominent, and set in the front of the battle, and has been the fruitful source of mistakes and disasters to our cause. In the present instance it led to the dangerous exper
McReynolds (search for this): chapter 12
of the Potomac were attached to their old commander. On that day, an official reception was given by the municipal authorities to the veterans of the First New York Cavalry, at which General McClellan, under whom they had served, was present. When the approach of their old commander was announced, the soldiers rushed to the door to meet him; and as he entered the room they crowded round him so that he could hardly walk. After an interchange of greetings between him and the officers, Colonel McReynolds, who commanded the regiment, spoke as follows:-- soldiers:--But a short time ago the chairman of this occasion did us the honor to refer to the fact that the First New York Cavalry were the last on the Chickahominy and the first to reach the James River. It was a proud announcement, gentlemen, and it was true. I now have the honor, and the great pleasure, to announce to you that the noble chieftain who led the Army of tho Potomac on that occasion, that matchless chieftain, General
from Yorktown to Antietam. Yet how could they be other than brave and patriotic? for they first saw the light amid scenes classical in our earliest history, and sprang from ancestors who won and held their mountains in hundreds of combats against the Indians, the French, and the English. After a gallant defence of the now ruined ramparts of William Henry, the blood of many of your grandsires moistened the very ground on which you now stand, in a butchery permitted by the cruel apathy of Montcalm, who, two years afterwards, suffered for his crimes in the great battle under the walls of Quebec, where others of your ancestors bore a most honorable part. Ticonderoga, Crown Point, Saratoga, are all names made sacred to you by the bravery of your fathers, who there made illustrious the name of American troops. In this latter and more dreadful war you and yours have proved worthy of the reputation of your predecessors. And, whatever sacrifice may yet be necessary, I am confident that
Fitz-John Porter (search for this): chapter 12
ounted upon a fine horse, attended by a retinue of fine-looking military men, riding rapidly through the ranks, gracefully recognized and bade a farewell to the army, the cries and demonstrations of the men were beyond bounds,--wild, impassioned, and unrestrained. Disregarding all military forms, they rushed from their ranks, and thronged around him with the bitterest complaints against those who had removed from command their beloved leader. As he rode up to the Headquarters of General Fitz-John Porter, he was met by a large delegation of officers in that command, and addressed by General Butterfield, who, in a few well-chosen words, alluded to the affection existing between General McClellan and his officers, and stated that those on behalf of whom he spoke were there to bid him a personal farewell. In reply, General McClellan said, I hardly know what to say to you, my friends, officers associated with me so long in the Army of the Potomac. I can only bid you farewell. History
-I stand before you not as a maker of speeches, not as a politician, but as a soldier. I came among you to seek quiet and repose, and from the moment I came among you I have received nothing but kindness; and, although I came among you a stranger, I am well acquainted with your history. From the time I took command, your gallant sons were with me, from the siege of Yorktown to the battle of Antietam. I was with them, and witnessed their bravery, and that of the ever-faithful and ever-true Taylor and the intrepid and dashing Kearney. One word more. While the army is fighting, you, as citizens, should see that the war is prosecuted for the preservation of the Union and the Constitution, for your nationality and rights as citizens. Since the time of his removal from the command of the Army of the Potomac, General McClellan has not had any military duties assigned to him, but has been living, unemployed, the life of a private citizen. At this moment of writing (July, 1864), he re
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