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Browsing named entities in a specific section of G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army. Search the whole document.

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Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: Farewell to the army reception at Trenton visit to Boston in the winter of 1863 oration at West Point in June, 1864 The reasons for this summary and abrupt dismissal of General McClellan, strange to say, have never been distinctly and officially given to the people of the United States. The Presidentmac too recently to make a speech. Our parting was sad. I can say nothing more to you; and I do not think you ought to expect a speech from me. He arrived at Trenton, his point of destination, at four o'clock on the morning of the 12th. On the evening of the 13th, an address of welcome was made to General McClellan, on behalf of the citizens of Trenton, by Andrew Dutcher, Esq. A large number of interested and sympathizing spectators were present. In reply, he said,-- My friends,--for I feel that you are all my friends,--I stand before you not as a maker of speeches, not as a politician, but as a soldier. I came among you to seek quiet and repose
West Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ellan has recently appeared before the public, with much honor to himself, in a literary capacity. In the autumn of 1863, the officers of the army stationed at West Point formed an association for erecting at that post a monument in commemoration of such officers of the regular army as shall have fallen in the service during the present war. The permission of the Secretary of War to erect the proposed monument at West Point was obtained, and letters were addressed to commanding generals and others, describing the project and soliciting co-operation. Many favorable replies were received; and in January, 1864, a general circular was sent to the officers ofhoice of a site for the proposed monument and have it consecrated by appropriate religious ceremonies. Trophy Point, on the northern brow of the plain on which West Point stands, was accordingly selected, and the 15th of June, 1864, was named as the day for its dedication. General McClellan was requested to deliver the oration.
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
uct of the war, and the President's Proclamation of September 22. That letter incurred for General McClellan the unrelenting hostility of the political party which constrained the President to issue the Proclamation; and the same influences, or pressure, which procured the document in question, compelled the removal of General McClellan. And that a strong pressure was brought to bear upon the President is unquestionable; for on the 13th of September, in an interview with a deputation from Chicago, when urged to issue a proclamation of emancipation, he distinctly declined it, saying, among other things, What good would a proclamation of emancipation from me do, especially as we are now situated? I do not want to issue a document that the whole world will see must necessarily be inoperative, like the Pope's bull against the comet. Would my word free the slaves, when I cannot even enforce the Constitution in the rebel States? Is there a single court or individual that would be influ
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
arewell now, if I must say it. Good-bye: God bless you. On the 11th, General McClellan left Warrenton. On reaching Warrenton Junction, a salute was fired. The troops, who had been drawn up in line, afterwards broke their ranks; the soldiers crowded around him, and many eagerly called for a few parting words. He said, in response, while standing on the platform of the railroad-station, I wish you to stand by General Burnside as you have stood by me, and all will be well. He reached Washington, but, without stopping, went to the station of the Philadelphia Railroad, and proceeded to the latter city in the train which started at five P. M. lie arrived at Philadelphia about midnight, and was there greeted with music and cheers from a crowd assembled to welcome him. tie appeared upon the platform, and said,-- Fellow-citizens of Philadelphia, I thank you for your kindness. I have parted with your brothers and sons in the Army of the Potomac too recently to make a speech. Our pa
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
only bid you farewell. History will do justice to the deeds of the Army of the Potomac, if the present generation does not. I feel as if I had been intimately connected with each and all of you. Nothing is more binding than the friendship of companions in arms. May you all in future preserve the high reputation of our army, and serve all as well and faithfully as you have served me. I will say farewell now, if I must say it. Good-bye: God bless you. On the 11th, General McClellan left Warrenton. On reaching Warrenton Junction, a salute was fired. The troops, who had been drawn up in line, afterwards broke their ranks; the soldiers crowded around him, and many eagerly called for a few parting words. He said, in response, while standing on the platform of the railroad-station, I wish you to stand by General Burnside as you have stood by me, and all will be well. He reached Washington, but, without stopping, went to the station of the Philadelphia Railroad, and proceeded to th
Northampton (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
of Judge Woodward's friends left Philadelphia on Sunday evening, October 11,--the day of the election being Tuesday, October 13,--and went to Orange, New Jersey, and laid the whole matter before General McClellan. The result was the following letter:-- Orange, New Jersey, October 12, 1863. Hon. Charles J. Ingersoll, Philadelphia. dear Sir:--My attention has been called to an article in the Philadelphia Press, asserting that I had written to the managers of a Democratic meeting at Allentown, disapproving the objects of the meeting, and that, if I voted or spoke, it would be in favor of Governor Curtin. I am informed that similar assertions have been made throughout the State. It has been my earnest endeavor heretofore to avoid participating in party politics, and I am determined to adhere to this course. But it is obvious that I cannot longer maintain silence under such misrepresentations. I therefore request you to deny that I have written any such letter or entertai
Lake George, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
that of a newspaper or pamphlet, a production so strongly stamped with the characteristics of his mind and character. In the course of a brief excursion which followed the delivery of the address above alluded to, General McClellan received many gratifying proofs of the affectionate attachment felt for him by the people of the country generally, and of the lively interest with which they follow his movements. On the evening of the 18th of June, at Fort William Henry, on the banks of Lake George, he was serenaded; and, at the close of the music, having been introduced by Judge Brown to the numerous party which had assembled to pay their respects to him, he addressed them, as follows:-- I thank you, my friends, for this welcome and pleasing evidence of your regard. It is a most happy termination of the delightful week I have passed in the midst of this beautiful region, among such warm and friendly hearts. When men come, as you have done, some many miles from the mountains an
Fort Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
from ancestors who won and held their mountains in hundreds of combats against the Indians, the French, and the English. After a gallant defence of the now ruined ramparts of William Henry, the blood of many of your grandsires moistened the very ground on which you now stand, in a butchery permitted by the cruel apathy of Montcalm, who, two years afterwards, suffered for his crimes in the great battle under the walls of Quebec, where others of your ancestors bore a most honorable part. Ticonderoga, Crown Point, Saratoga, are all names made sacred to you by the bravery of your fathers, who there made illustrious the name of American troops. In this latter and more dreadful war you and yours have proved worthy of the reputation of your predecessors. And, whatever sacrifice may yet be necessary, I am confident that you will never consent willingly to be citizens of a divided and degraded nation, but that you will so support the actions of your fellow-countrymen in the field that w
Orange, N. J. (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ot had any military duties assigned to him, but has been living, unemployed, the life of a private citizen. At this moment of writing (July, 1864), he resides at Orange, in the State of New Jersey, where his home has been for some months past. In the winter of 1863, General McClellan, accompanied by his wife and two or three ocordingly, one of Judge Woodward's friends left Philadelphia on Sunday evening, October 11,--the day of the election being Tuesday, October 13,--and went to Orange, New Jersey, and laid the whole matter before General McClellan. The result was the following letter:-- Orange, New Jersey, October 12, 1863. Hon. Charles J. IngeOrange, New Jersey, October 12, 1863. Hon. Charles J. Ingersoll, Philadelphia. dear Sir:--My attention has been called to an article in the Philadelphia Press, asserting that I had written to the managers of a Democratic meeting at Allentown, disapproving the objects of the meeting, and that, if I voted or spoke, it would be in favor of Governor Curtin. I am informed that similar ass
West Point (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
Chapter 12: Farewell to the army reception at Trenton visit to Boston in the winter of 1863 oration at West Point in June, 1864 The reasons for this summary and abrupt dismissal of General McClellan, strange to say, have never been distinctly and officially given to the people of the United States. The President, in his annual message to Congress, only twenty-six days later than the date of his order of removal, says nothing upon the subject. The general-in-chief, in his Report, addressed to the Secretary of War, says, From the 17th of September till the 26th of October, McClellan's main army remained on the north bank of the Potomac, in the vicinity of Sharpsburg and Harper's Ferry. The long inactivity of so large an army in the face of a defeated foe and during the most favorable season for rapid movements and a vigorous campaign, was a matter of great disappointment and regret. Your letter of the 27th and my reply on the 28th of October, in regard to t
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