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Browsing named entities in a specific section of G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army. Search the whole document.

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September 13th (search for this): chapter 12
written at Harrison's Landing, on the policy and conduct of the war, and the President's Proclamation of September 22. That letter incurred for General McClellan the unrelenting hostility of the political party which constrained the President to issue the Proclamation; and the same influences, or pressure, which procured the document in question, compelled the removal of General McClellan. And that a strong pressure was brought to bear upon the President is unquestionable; for on the 13th of September, in an interview with a deputation from Chicago, when urged to issue a proclamation of emancipation, he distinctly declined it, saying, among other things, What good would a proclamation of emancipation from me do, especially as we are now situated? I do not want to issue a document that the whole world will see must necessarily be inoperative, like the Pope's bull against the comet. Would my word free the slaves, when I cannot even enforce the Constitution in the rebel States? Is t
September 17th (search for this): chapter 12
it to Boston in the winter of 1863 oration at West Point in June, 1864 The reasons for this summary and abrupt dismissal of General McClellan, strange to say, have never been distinctly and officially given to the people of the United States. The President, in his annual message to Congress, only twenty-six days later than the date of his order of removal, says nothing upon the subject. The general-in-chief, in his Report, addressed to the Secretary of War, says, From the 17th of September till the 26th of October, McClellan's main army remained on the north bank of the Potomac, in the vicinity of Sharpsburg and Harper's Ferry. The long inactivity of so large an army in the face of a defeated foe and during the most favorable season for rapid movements and a vigorous campaign, was a matter of great disappointment and regret. Your letter of the 27th and my reply on the 28th of October, in regard to the alleged causes of this unhappy delay, I herewith submit, marked Exhi
September 22nd (search for this): chapter 12
ived as the real cause why General McClellan was deprived of his command. Had this been done immediately after the 6th of October, or at least soon after, the pretext would have had some show of seeming. The real reasons for which General McClellan was removed were political, and not military. They are to be found in the wide difference of views between his letter of July 7, 1862, written at Harrison's Landing, on the policy and conduct of the war, and the President's Proclamation of September 22. That letter incurred for General McClellan the unrelenting hostility of the political party which constrained the President to issue the Proclamation; and the same influences, or pressure, which procured the document in question, compelled the removal of General McClellan. And that a strong pressure was brought to bear upon the President is unquestionable; for on the 13th of September, in an interview with a deputation from Chicago, when urged to issue a proclamation of emancipation, h
October 6th (search for this): chapter 12
the 28th of October, in regard to the alleged causes of this unhappy delay, I herewith submit, marked Exhibit No. 5. In reply to the telegraphic order of the 6th of October, quoted in my letter of the 28th, above referred to, General McClellan disapproved of the plan of crossing the Potomac south of the Blue Ridge, and said that ause he had disobeyed the orders of the President without cause or excuse. The orders in question, to cross the river and attack the enemy, were given on the 6th of October, the forward movement began on the 26th of the same month, and the removal of General McClellan was made on the 5th of November, when the army were thirty or he public if they suppose this will be received as the real cause why General McClellan was deprived of his command. Had this been done immediately after the 6th of October, or at least soon after, the pretext would have had some show of seeming. The real reasons for which General McClellan was removed were political, and not
October 11th (search for this): chapter 12
test. They were all devoted to General McClellan; but an impression was spread among them that he was in favor of Governor Curtin. A correspondent of The press, a leading political journal, had so stated. Under these circumstances, it was deemed by the friends of Judge Woodward highly important that this erroneous impression should be removed by a distinct contradiction under General McClellan's own hand. Accordingly, one of Judge Woodward's friends left Philadelphia on Sunday evening, October 11,--the day of the election being Tuesday, October 13,--and went to Orange, New Jersey, and laid the whole matter before General McClellan. The result was the following letter:-- Orange, New Jersey, October 12, 1863. Hon. Charles J. Ingersoll, Philadelphia. dear Sir:--My attention has been called to an article in the Philadelphia Press, asserting that I had written to the managers of a Democratic meeting at Allentown, disapproving the objects of the meeting, and that, if I voted or
October 13th (search for this): chapter 12
n; but an impression was spread among them that he was in favor of Governor Curtin. A correspondent of The press, a leading political journal, had so stated. Under these circumstances, it was deemed by the friends of Judge Woodward highly important that this erroneous impression should be removed by a distinct contradiction under General McClellan's own hand. Accordingly, one of Judge Woodward's friends left Philadelphia on Sunday evening, October 11,--the day of the election being Tuesday, October 13,--and went to Orange, New Jersey, and laid the whole matter before General McClellan. The result was the following letter:-- Orange, New Jersey, October 12, 1863. Hon. Charles J. Ingersoll, Philadelphia. dear Sir:--My attention has been called to an article in the Philadelphia Press, asserting that I had written to the managers of a Democratic meeting at Allentown, disapproving the objects of the meeting, and that, if I voted or spoke, it would be in favor of Governor Curtin.
October 26th (search for this): chapter 12
general-in-chief, in his Report, addressed to the Secretary of War, says, From the 17th of September till the 26th of October, McClellan's main army remained on the north bank of the Potomac, in the vicinity of Sharpsburg and Harper's Ferry. id that lie would cross at Harper's Ferry and advance upon Winchester. He, however, did not begin to cross till the 26th of October, and then at Berlin. The passage occupied several days, and was completed about the 3d of November. What caused cClellan ceased to communicate with the general-in-chief. About what time? Two dates Lad just before been mentioned,--October 26 and November 3; and there is nothing to indicate which of the two was meant. If it were the latter, General McClellan mmittee on the Conduct of the War, there appear no less than six despatches addressed to him by General McClellan after October 26. General McClellan's communications to the President were generally in reply to inquiries or suggestions from the la
October 28th (search for this): chapter 12
eral-in-chief, in his Report, addressed to the Secretary of War, says, From the 17th of September till the 26th of October, McClellan's main army remained on the north bank of the Potomac, in the vicinity of Sharpsburg and Harper's Ferry. The long inactivity of so large an army in the face of a defeated foe and during the most favorable season for rapid movements and a vigorous campaign, was a matter of great disappointment and regret. Your letter of the 27th and my reply on the 28th of October, in regard to the alleged causes of this unhappy delay, I herewith submit, marked Exhibit No. 5. In reply to the telegraphic order of the 6th of October, quoted in my letter of the 28th, above referred to, General McClellan disapproved of the plan of crossing the Potomac south of the Blue Ridge, and said that lie would cross at Harper's Ferry and advance upon Winchester. He, however, did not begin to cross till the 26th of October, and then at Berlin. The passage occupied several d
November 3rd (search for this): chapter 12
the Blue Ridge, and said that lie would cross at Harper's Ferry and advance upon Winchester. He, however, did not begin to cross till the 26th of October, and then at Berlin. The passage occupied several days, and was completed about the 3d of November. What caused him to change his views, or what his plan of campaign was, I am ignorant; for about this time he ceased to communicate with me in regard to his operations, sending his reports directly to the President. This is a curious sentte against General McClellan. If it means this, will any body believe it? Again, about this time General McClellan ceased to communicate with the general-in-chief. About what time? Two dates Lad just before been mentioned,--October 26 and November 3; and there is nothing to indicate which of the two was meant. If it were the latter, General McClellan could not have had time to send many communications to anybody after that day, as he was deprived of his command on the 7th: if it were the
November 5th (search for this): chapter 12
ill be seen that no reason is assigned for what the general-in-chief chooses to call relieving General McClellan; but, from the whole evidence before him, the reader is left to infer that he was removed because he had disobeyed the orders of the President without cause or excuse. The orders in question, to cross the river and attack the enemy, were given on the 6th of October, the forward movement began on the 26th of the same month, and the removal of General McClellan was made on the 5th of November, when the army were thirty or forty miles on their march, in splendid condition and high spirits. In other words, an officer is removed for disobeying orders not only one month after they were given, but eleven days after he had begun to obey them! The Administration must have great confidence in the credulity of the public if they suppose this will be received as the real cause why General McClellan was deprived of his command. Had this been done immediately after the 6th of October
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