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the Army of the Potomac. I can only bid you farewell. History will do justice to the deeds of the Army of the Potomac, if the present generation does not. I feel as if I had been intimately connected with each and all of you. Nothing is more binding than the friendship of companions in arms. May you all in future preserve the high reputation of our army, and serve all as well and faithfully as you have served me. I will say farewell now, if I must say it. Good-bye: God bless you. On the 11th, General McClellan left Warrenton. On reaching Warrenton Junction, a salute was fired. The troops, who had been drawn up in line, afterwards broke their ranks; the soldiers crowded around him, and many eagerly called for a few parting words. He said, in response, while standing on the platform of the railroad-station, I wish you to stand by General Burnside as you have stood by me, and all will be well. He reached Washington, but, without stopping, went to the station of the Philadelphi
October 11th (search for this): chapter 12
test. They were all devoted to General McClellan; but an impression was spread among them that he was in favor of Governor Curtin. A correspondent of The press, a leading political journal, had so stated. Under these circumstances, it was deemed by the friends of Judge Woodward highly important that this erroneous impression should be removed by a distinct contradiction under General McClellan's own hand. Accordingly, one of Judge Woodward's friends left Philadelphia on Sunday evening, October 11,--the day of the election being Tuesday, October 13,--and went to Orange, New Jersey, and laid the whole matter before General McClellan. The result was the following letter:-- Orange, New Jersey, October 12, 1863. Hon. Charles J. Ingersoll, Philadelphia. dear Sir:--My attention has been called to an article in the Philadelphia Press, asserting that I had written to the managers of a Democratic meeting at Allentown, disapproving the objects of the meeting, and that, if I voted or
ter experience of Fredericksburg was the direct result. The first act of General McClellan on receiving the order relieving him of command was to draw up a farewell address to the army, as follows,--which was read to them at dress-parade on the 10th:-- Headquarters army of the Potomac, camp near Rectortown, November 7, 1862. officers and soldiers of the army of the Potomac:-- An order of the President devolves upon Major-General Burnside the command of this army. In parting from you,an raised it, and said, To the army of the Potomac, to which an officer present added, and to its old commander. An hour or two of social converse passed, and the officers took leave of their beloved commander,--sadly, sorrowfully. Monday, the 10th, was occupied in visiting the various camps and bidding farewell to his troops. A person present at this scene has thus described it:--As General McClellan, mounted upon a fine horse, attended by a retinue of fine-looking military men, riding rap
y an indissoluble tie. We shall ever be comrades in supporting the Constitution of our country and the nationality of its people. George B. Mcclellan, Major-General, U. S. A. On Saturday, November 8, General McClellan was busily occupied in making the arrangements necessary for transferring his command to General Burnside. The two generals, between whom the personal relations were entirely friendly, were in consultation for several hours. At nine o'clock on the evening of Sunday, the 9th, General McClellan took leave of his staff officers by appointment. It was a touching and impressive scene. A large fire of logs was blazing within the enclosure formed by the tents of the Headquarters. General McClellan stood just inside of his marquee, the curtains of which were parted and drawn up. As the officers of his staff approached, he grasped each warmly by the hand, and, with a few words of friendly greeting, ushered him inside. The tent was soon filled, and many were compelled
tober 26 and November 3; and there is nothing to indicate which of the two was meant. If it were the latter, General McClellan could not have had time to send many communications to anybody after that day, as he was deprived of his command on the 7th: if it were the former, then the statement is not true; for in the appendix to General Halleck's testimony, as published by the Congressional Committee on the Conduct of the War, there appear no less than six despatches addressed to him by Generaleived the written order of the President relieving General McClellan and placing General Burnside in command of the Army of the Potomac. This order was transmitted by a special messenger, who delivered it to General McClellan at Rectortown on the 7th. Here it will be seen that no reason is assigned for what the general-in-chief chooses to call relieving General McClellan; but, from the whole evidence before him, the reader is left to infer that he was removed because he had disobeyed the o
November 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 12
he fruitful source of mistakes and disasters to our cause. In the present instance it led to the dangerous experiment of changing commanders in front of an enemy; and the bitter experience of Fredericksburg was the direct result. The first act of General McClellan on receiving the order relieving him of command was to draw up a farewell address to the army, as follows,--which was read to them at dress-parade on the 10th:-- Headquarters army of the Potomac, camp near Rectortown, November 7, 1862. officers and soldiers of the army of the Potomac:-- An order of the President devolves upon Major-General Burnside the command of this army. In parting from you, I cannot express the love and gratitude I bear you. As an army you have grown up under my care. In you I have never found doubt or coldness. The battles you have fought under my command will proudly live in our nation's history. The glory you have achieved, our mutual perils and fatigues, the graves of our comrades fall
his. The success of a military movement often depends upon its being kept an entire secret from the enemy. General McClellan had learned by experience the danger of revealing, even in official conversation, his future operations; and it would have been an increased risk if he had made the telegraph-wire a confidant. The whole passage is characteristic of the inventive ingenuity which has been shown, from first to last, in devising pretexts to find fault with General McClellan. On the 5th instant I received the written order of the President relieving General McClellan and placing General Burnside in command of the Army of the Potomac. This order was transmitted by a special messenger, who delivered it to General McClellan at Rectortown on the 7th. Here it will be seen that no reason is assigned for what the general-in-chief chooses to call relieving General McClellan; but, from the whole evidence before him, the reader is left to infer that he was removed because he had diso
June 15th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 12
ed; and in January, 1864, a general circular was sent to the officers of the army, setting forth the plan and asking subscriptions. The response to this appeal was so universal, prompt, and earnest that the committee who had the enterprise in charge felt authorized to make choice of a site for the proposed monument and have it consecrated by appropriate religious ceremonies. Trophy Point, on the northern brow of the plain on which West Point stands, was accordingly selected, and the 15th of June, 1864, was named as the day for its dedication. General McClellan was requested to deliver the oration. On the appointed day the site for the proposed monument was consecrated by appropriate religious services. The oration by General McClellan was heard with great interest and deep attention by a very large audience, and, after its delivery, was immediately published in many of the Democratic newspapers of the country. It was much commended by all who had the opportunity to read it and
October, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 12
takes. The inscription which the sword bore, Pro rege saepe, Pro patria semper, excited an amount of discussion and comment in the newspaper press in which future observers will recognize an amusing instance of the importance which trifles may assume when viewed through a properly magnifying medium. While in Boston, he was invited to visit Concord, New Hampshire, Portland and Augusta, in Maine, and other places; but he was not able to accept any of these gratifying invitations. In October, 1863, the State election in Pennsylvania took place. Governor Curtin was the Republican candidate for Governor, and Judge Woodward the Democratic. The election was contested with great ardor, and all over the country much interest was felt in the result. It was thought that the vote of the soldiers, who were coming into the State in great numbers, was of much importance, and would, perhaps, decide the contest. They were all devoted to General McClellan; but an impression was spread among
ry duties assigned to him, but has been living, unemployed, the life of a private citizen. At this moment of writing (July, 1864), he resides at Orange, in the State of New Jersey, where his home has been for some months past. In the winter of 1863, General McClellan, accompanied by his wife and two or three officers of his staff, paid a visit to Boston, arriving there on the 29th of January and remaining till the 8th of February. He came upon the invitation of several gentlemen, not all ofn took leave with a few words of farewell, the soldiers cheering and crowding round him as he went out of the room. General McClellan has recently appeared before the public, with much honor to himself, in a literary capacity. In the autumn of 1863, the officers of the army stationed at West Point formed an association for erecting at that post a monument in commemoration of such officers of the regular army as shall have fallen in the service during the present war. The permission of the Se
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