hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George B. McClellan 662 4 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 309 5 Browse Search
George Brinton McClellan 145 9 Browse Search
G. B. McClellan 138 0 Browse Search
I. McDowell 119 1 Browse Search
United States (United States) 94 0 Browse Search
H. W. Halleck 87 5 Browse Search
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) 82 0 Browse Search
E. V. Sumner 77 1 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 60 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army. Search the whole document.

Found 598 total hits in 138 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Texas (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
by reducing Wilmington and Charleston; to advance our centre into South Carolina and Georgia; to push Buell either towards Montgomery or to unite with the main army in Georgia; to throw Halleck southward to meet the naval expedition from New Orleans. We should then be in a condition to reduce at our leisure all the Southern sea-ports, to occupy all the avenues of communication, to use the great outlet of the Mississippi, to re-establish our Government and arms in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas, to force the slaves to labor for our subsistence instead of that of the rebels, to bid defiance to all foreign interference. Such is the object I have ever had in view; this is the general plan which I hope to accomplish. For many long months I have labored to prepare the Army of the Potomac to play its part in the programme. From the day when I was placed in command of all our armies, I have exerted myself to place all the other armies in such a condition that they too could perform t
Charles Town (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
g a permanent bridge by means of canal-boats but, on attempting to pass the boats through the left lock, it was found, for the first time, that the lock was too small to permit their passage. This unexpected obstacle deranged the plans; and an order which had been given for the movement of some forces from Washington was countermanded. Every exertion was made to establish, as promptly as possible, depots of forage and subsistence on the Virginia side, to supply the troops. On the 28th, Charlestown was occupied by a strong Federal force; and on the same day General McClellan returned to Washington. In spite of the untoward mischance of the canal-boats,--for which the commander-in-chief could not be responsible,--the design aimed at had been accomplished, and before the 1st of April the railroad was in running order. With General McClellan's return to Washington on the 28th of February, preparations were begun for carrying out the wishes of the President and Secretary of War in r
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
is secure, for the reason that the enemy is too distant to reach us in time: he can only oppose us in front; we bring our fleet into full play. After a successful battle, our position would be — Burnside forming our left, Norfolk held securely, our centre connecting Burnside with Buell both by Raleigh and Lynchburg, Buell in Eastern Tennessee and North Alabama, Halleck at Nashville and Memphis. The next movement would be to connect with Sherman on the left, by reducing Wilmington and Charleston; to advance our centre into South Carolina and Georgia; to push Buell either towards Montgomery or to unite with the main army in Georgia; to throw Halleck southward to meet the naval expedition from New Orleans. We should then be in a condition to reduce at our leisure all the Southern sea-ports, to occupy all the avenues of communication, to use the great outlet of the Mississippi, to re-establish our Government and arms in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas, to force the slaves to labor
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he disposable force of the Army of the Potomac, after providing safely for the defence of Washington, be formed into an expedition for the immediate object of seizing and occupying a point upon the railroad southwestward of what is known as Manassas Junction, all details to be in the discretion of the commander-in-chief, and the expedition to move before or on the 22d day of February next. Abraham Lincoln. These two orders should be considered together and carefully pondered by every candi 1862. The President, having considered the plan of operations agreed upon by yourself and the commanders of army corps, makes no objection to the same, but gives the following directions as to its execution:-- 1. Leave such force at Manassas Junction as shall make it entirely certain that the enemy shall not repossess himself of that position and line of communication. 2. Leave Washington entirely secure. 3. Move the remainder of the force down the Potomac, choosing a new base at
Aquia Creek (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
source of great annoyance to the Administration and of mortification to the people, and a strong desire was felt that a movement should be made to destroy them; but General McClellan was of the opinion that such an attempt would be attended with danger, and that the destruction of these batteries by our army would afford but temporary relief unless we were strong enough to hold the entire line of the Potomac. The desired end could be secured either by driving the enemy from Manassas and Acquia Creek by superior force, or by manoeuvring to compel him to vacate the position. The latter course was finally adopted, with success. That an onward movement should be made to Richmond, and the rebellion be there attacked in its heart, was a point on which the public, the Administration, and the commander-in-chief were agreed; but by what route to make the approach — whether by the Lower Potomac and the Peninsula, or by a direct attack upon the positions at Manassas and Centreville — formed
Centreville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ut eighty thousand men, was at Manassas and Centreville. At these points the positions were naturat attack upon the positions at Manassas and Centreville — formed a fruitful subject of debate in thon the intrenched positions of the enemy at Centreville, Manassas, &c., or else a movement to turn should be attacked in front at Manassas and Centreville, or whether a movement should be made down was beginning to evacuate his positions at Centreville and Manassas, as well as on the Upper and Lat McClellan never intended to advance upon Centreville. His long-determined purpose was to make Woffensive, threatened with attack either at Centreville, where defence would be useless if successfvement of the army the next morning towards Centreville and Manassas, sending in advance two regimeavalry advance reached the enemy's lines at Centreville, finding there still burning heaps of milit apprehend an attack by way of Manassas and Centreville; for the enemy in their retreat across the
High Point, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
comprising about eighty thousand men, was at Manassas and Centreville. At these points the positions were naturally very strong, with impassable streams and broken ground, affording ample protection to their flanks, and with lines of intrenchment sweeping all the available approaches. The right was at Brooks's Station, Dumfries, Lower Occoquan and vicinity, numbering about eighteen thousand. This wing of the army formed a support to several batteries on the Lower Potomac, extending from High Point and Cockpit Point to the Chopawampsic Creek. These batteries, greatly obstructing the navigation of the river, and to this extent practically blockading Washington, were a source of great annoyance to the Administration and of mortification to the people, and a strong desire was felt that a movement should be made to destroy them; but General McClellan was of the opinion that such an attempt would be attended with danger, and that the destruction of these batteries by our army would affor
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Chapter 6: Commencement of the Peninsular campaign of 1862 We are now brought to the close of the year 1861 and the opening of 1862. The positions and numbers of the Confederate army in Eastern Virginia were as follows. At Norfolk and Yorktown there was a considerable force,--probably over thirty thousand men. The army before Washington occupied an extended line running from the southeast to the northwest. The left wing was at Leesburg and its vicinity, in force about forty-five hundred; and there were about thirteen thousand in the valley of the Shenandoah. The main body, comprising about eighty thousand men, was at Manassas and Centreville. At these points the positions were naturally very strong, with impassable streams and broken ground, affording ample protection to their flanks, and with lines of intrenchment sweeping all the available approaches. The right was at Brooks's Station, Dumfries, Lower Occoquan and vicinity, numbering about eighteen thousand. Thi
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
f War. This seems hardly respectful to the President of the United States, after his announcement in his Annual Message that he had appoi day for a general movement of the land and naval forces of the United States against the insurgent forces. That especially the army at and publican general or a Democratic general. The President of the United States is a civilian, without military training or experience; and he ference of opinion, is the contest between the President of the United States and the general who acts under peremptory orders to take a certroceeds:-- When I was placed in command of the armies of the United States, I immediately turned my attention to the whole field of operate success of our arms. After reading it, the President of, the United States ought at once to have removed either that officer or Mr. Stantoth, McCall, Blenker, Negley, and Barnard. The President of the United States was also there. The plans of General McClellan were fully expl
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
Fort Monroe, with our flanks perfectly covered by the fleet. During the whole movement our left flank is covered by the water. Our right is secure, for the reason that the enemy is too distant to reach us in time: he can only oppose us in front; we bring our fleet into full play. After a successful battle, our position would be — Burnside forming our left, Norfolk held securely, our centre connecting Burnside with Buell both by Raleigh and Lynchburg, Buell in Eastern Tennessee and North Alabama, Halleck at Nashville and Memphis. The next movement would be to connect with Sherman on the left, by reducing Wilmington and Charleston; to advance our centre into South Carolina and Georgia; to push Buell either towards Montgomery or to unite with the main army in Georgia; to throw Halleck southward to meet the naval expedition from New Orleans. We should then be in a condition to reduce at our leisure all the Southern sea-ports, to occupy all the avenues of communication, to use
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...