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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ity by instituting legal proceedings, which should bring it ultimately to an adjudication by the Supreme Court of the United States. To this end, Gov. Briggs appointed Hon. Samuel Hoar--one of her most eminent and venerable citizens, who had servedrisoned, for the purpose of having the legality of such imprisonment tried and determined in the Supreme Court of the United States. The next morning, Mr. Hoar called on Mr. Eggleston, who had been appointed to the same agency before him, and reqs essential to every independent State. Resolved, 2d, That free and other persons of color are not citizens of the United States, within the meaning of the Constitution, which confers upon the citizens of one State the privileges and immunities o you expect? he asked; you can never get a verdict; and, if you should, the marshal would need all the troops of the United States to enforce the judgment. Mr. Hoar remarked that enforcing the judgment was no part of his business, and they thereup
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
all other States. The assumption that negroes are not, and cannot be, citizens, is abundantly refuted by the action of several of the Slave States themselves. Till within a recent period, free negroes were not merely citizens, but electors, of those States--which all citizens are not, or need not be. John Bell, when first elected to Congress, in 1827, running out Felix Grundy, received the votes of several colored electors, and used, long after, to confess his obligation to them. North Carolina allowed her free negroes, who possessed the requisite qualifications in other respects, to vote, regardless of their color, down to about 1830. Their habit of voting for the Federal or Whig candidates, and against the Democratic, was a subject of frequent and jocular remark — the Whigs insisting that the instincts of the negro impelled him uniformly to associate, so far as practicable, with the more gentlemanly portion of the white race. In the year 1835, December 19th. the Legisl
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
as under consideration, the delegates from South Carolina moved to amend by inserting the word white by the State of Massachusetts to the State of South Carolina, with the avowed purpose of interferiporting to be from the Attorney-General of South Carolina, urging the avoidance of a resort to lynchmarks about the insult by Massachusetts to South Carolina, and her determination to be rid of Mr. Ho report of his visit to and expulsion from South Carolina, asked the following portentous questions:ast practical validity or binding force in South Carolina, except where she thinks its operation fav Massachusetts complains that a citizen of South Carolina had done him an injury; saying that she haizen of Massachusetts within the limits of South Carolina, whenever she thinks his presence there in be regarded as the conquered provinces of South Carolina? Such was the mannerin which South CarSouth Carolina, with the hearty approval of her slaveholding sisters, received and repelled the attempt of Ma[3 more...]
Columbia (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
in the matter in advance of the proposed introduction. Mr. Hoar assented, and Eggleston left Mr. H. waiting in his office, while he proceeded to confer with the Mayor. After a considerable absence, he returned, and stated that the Mayor was at Columbia, attending the session of the Legislature, and that the gentleman who temporarily discharged the duties of the officer judged it best that all further proceedings should await his return. This was assented to, and Mr. Hoar waited through the nethat the Sheriff shall see that the sentence of banishment be executed, and imprison such offender if he returns, unless by unavoidable accident.] On Monday, December 2d, Mr. Hoar was, for the first time, apprised of the reception accorded at Columbia to his mission, and of the commotion it had raised. After discussing the matter freely with those around him, he walked out for some distance, and, returning at dark to his hotel, he encountered three persons standing on the piazza. One of the
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ored seamen, cooks, etc., of Northern vessels trading to Charleston. Massachusetts, therefore, at length resolved, through ant trusts, including a seat in Congress — to proceed to Charleston, and there institute the necessary proceedings, in orderw duty, and left home accordingly in November, 1844, for Charleston; reaching that city on the 28th of that month. So utterim, and requested of him an introduction to the Mayor of Charleston, his object being to procure access to the records of or courts of law or equity, or the recorder of the city of Charleston, unless admitted to bail by the said judge or recorder; ouse. When seated, the sheriff inquired his business in Charleston; and was answered that he had already communicated it toeamen who had been taken out of Massachusetts vessels in Charleston, and there imprisoned under the law in question, and he rbance. The next day at noon, three leading citizens of Charleston, two of them eminent lawyers, and the third a president
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
f Northern vessels trading to Charleston. Massachusetts, therefore, at length resolved, through thng the number and the names of citizens of Massachusetts, who have heretofore been, or may be, durived, 3d, That the emissary sent by the State of Massachusetts to the State of South Carolina, with tibited his commission from the Governor of Massachusetts, and gave permission to copy it, as also tf colored seamen who had been taken out of Massachusetts vessels in Charleston, and there imprisoneted his former remarks about the insult by Massachusetts to South Carolina, and her determination termining such cases, in which a citizen of Massachusetts complains that a citizen of South Carolina, the residence of a free white citizen of Massachusetts within the limits of South Carolina, wheneters, received and repelled the attempt of Massachusetts to determine and enforce the rights, while by the Constitution of the United States. Massachusetts proposed no appeal to her own courts, no r[3 more...]
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
tants thereof respectively. When this Article was under consideration, the delegates from South Carolina moved to amend by inserting the word white between free and inhabitants; which was emphatically negatived — only two States voting for it: so it was determined that States had, or might have, citizens who were not white, and that these should be entitled to all the privileges of citizens in every other State. We have seen Page 80. that Congress, in 1821, resisted the attempt of Missouri to prohibit the immigration of free colored persons, deeming it a palpable violation of that requirement of the Federal Constitution above quoted; and would not admit that State into the Union until, by a second compromise, she was required to pledge herself that her Legislature should pass no act by which any of the citizens of either of the States should be excluded from the enjoyment of the privileges and immunities to which they are entitled under the Constitution of the United States.
James H. Hammond (search for this): chapter 13
rovoking violence, that his young daughter accompanied him. On the day of his arrival, Mr. Hoar addressed a letter to the Governor of South Carolina, Hon. James H. Hammond, since distinguished as a U. S. Senator. announcing the fact, and stating the purpose of his mission to be, the collecting and transmission of accurate inf it best that all further proceedings should await his return. This was assented to, and Mr. Hoar waited through the next three days accordingly. Meantime, Gov. Hammond had received Mr. Hoar's letter, and communicated it to the Legislature, by which it was received in high dudgeon. That Legislature proceeded to pass, by a sub any case which would properly present the question in controversy. At all events, he could not abide by his agreement. He added that he had information from Gov. Hammond which removed all personal objection, but reiterated his former remarks about the insult by Massachusetts to South Carolina, and her determination to be rid of
Samuel Hoar (search for this): chapter 13
Xiii. The Mission of Samuel Hoar. the Federal Constitution (Art. IV. § 2) provides that The cates. To this end, Gov. Briggs appointed Hon. Samuel Hoar--one of her most eminent and venerable citer in advance of the proposed introduction. Mr. Hoar assented, and Eggleston left Mr. H. waiting ioidable accident.] On Monday, December 2d, Mr. Hoar was, for the first time, apprised of the recef the United States to enforce the judgment. Mr. Hoar remarked that enforcing the judgment was no pme means. On leaving the sheriff's office, Mr. Hoar was proceeding to make a call, when he was st presented a cane or club, asking, Is your name Hoar? Yes, was the answer. He then said, You had bon. In the evening, a Dr. Whitredge, to whom Mr. Hoar had brought a letter from Boston, called upon they were there to conduct him to the boat. Mr. Hoar now stated that there was a report in circulaking to the carriage and being dragged to it, Mr. Hoar paid his bill at the hotel, called down his d[20 more...]
George N. Briggs (search for this): chapter 13
State, and the other half to the use of the informer. This act necessarily bore with great hardship on the colored seamen, cooks, etc., of Northern vessels trading to Charleston. Massachusetts, therefore, at length resolved, through the action of her Legislature, Resolves of March 24, 1843, and March 16, 1844. to test its constitutionality by instituting legal proceedings, which should bring it ultimately to an adjudication by the Supreme Court of the United States. To this end, Gov. Briggs appointed Hon. Samuel Hoar--one of her most eminent and venerable citizens, who had served her with honor in many important trusts, including a seat in Congress — to proceed to Charleston, and there institute the necessary proceedings, in order to bring the matter to judgment. Mr. Hoar accepted this new duty, and left home accordingly in November, 1844, for Charleston; reaching that city on the 28th of that month. So utterly unsuspecting was he of giving offense, or provoking violence,
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