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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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. Crossing Aug. 24. the Tennessee at Harrison, a few miles above Chattanooga, with 36 regiments of infantry, 5 of cavalry, and 40 guns, Bragg traversed the rugged mountain ridges which hem in the Sequatchie Valley, passing through Dunlap, Aug. 27. Pikeville, Aug. 30. Crossville, Sept. 1. masking his movement by a feint with cavalry on McMinnville, but rapidly withdrawing this when its purpose was accomplished, and pressing hurriedly northward, to Kentucky; which he entered on the 5th. Kirby Smith, with his division, from Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn.
resisting his advance, so as to gain time for the escape of his now immense trains, consisting mainly of captured Federal army wagons, heavily laden with the spoils of Kentucky. Here Buell learned that Kirby Smith had crossed the Kentucky, and that Bragg was moving to concentrate his forces either at Harrodsburg or Perryville. His own movement was therefore directed toward Perryville; three miles in front of which, moving with his 3d or central corps, he encountered, on the afternoon of the 7th, a considerable Rebel force, drawn up in order of battle; but which his advance pressed back a mile or so without much fighting; when he, expecting a battle, sent orders to McCook and Crittenden, commanding his flank corps, to advance on his right and left at 3 next morning. McCook did not receive the order till 2 1/2 A. M., and he marched at 5; but Crittenden, unable to find water for his corps at the place where Buell had expected it to encamp for the night, had moved off the road in que
gigantic raid, it is not probable, in view of the inevitable suffering and loss of animals on their long, hurried, famished flight through the rugged, sterile, thinly peopled mountain region, that all the Rebels took back into East Tennessee was equal in value to the outfit with which they had set forth on this adventure. Sill's division — which had followed Kirby Smith from Frankfort, and had had a little fight with his rearguard near Lawrenceburg — reached Perryville at nightfall on the 11th; up to which time Buell had made no decided advance. Pushing forward a strong reconnoissance next day to Dick's river, he found no enemy this side; and he learned at Danville, two days later, that Bragg was in full retreat. He sent forward in pursuit at midnight Wood's division, followed by the rest of Crittenden's and then by McCook's corps, while Gilbert's marched on the Lancaster road to the left. Wood struck the Rebel rearguard next morning at Stanford, but to little purpose; the enemy
thout regular supplies, seldom produce substantial, enduring results; and the Confederate guerrillas either soon abandoned Kentucky or concealed themselves and lay quiet therein. The leaders, with most of their followers, retired into Tennessee, where they captured Clarksville Aug. 19. and possessed themselves of ample military stores; and a sharp cavalry fight at Gallatin resulted in a Union defeat, with a loss of 30 killed, 50 wounded, and 75 prisoners. Gen. Buell had left Corinth in June, moving eastward, as if intent on Chattanooga; but Gen. Bragg--who had succeeded to the chief command of the Rebels confronting him — had thereupon moved more rapidly, on parallel roads, from Tupelo, Miss., through northern Alabama and Georgia, to Chattanooga, which he reached ahead of Buell's vanguard. Bragg's army had been swelled by conscription to some 45,000 men, organized in three corps, under Hardee, Bishop Polk, and Kirby Smith respectively, whereof the last was sent to Knoxville, wh
risoners of Brig.-Gens. Duffield and Crittenden, of Ind., with the 9th Michigan, 3d Minnesota, 4 companies of the 4th Ky. cavalry, and 3 companies of the 7th Pa. cavalry, after a spirited but brief resistance. Henderson, Ky., on the Ohio, was likewise seized by a guerrilla band, who clutched a large amount of hospital stores; and, being piloted across by some Indiana traitors, captured a hospital also at Newburg, Ind., and paroled its helpless inmates. Col. John Morgan likewise captured July 2. Cynthiana, in north-eastern Kentucky; but was run off directly by a superior cavalry force under Gen. Green Clay Smith. Morgan claims in his report to have captured and paroled 1,200 Union soldiers during this raid, with a total loss of but 90 of his men. Large quantities of plunder were thus obtained, while property of much greater value was destroyed; and enough recruits were doubtless gathered to offset the waste of war. Still, military operations, without a base and without regular sup
August 13th (search for this): chapter 10
which he entered on the 5th. Kirby Smith, with his division, from Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to London, where it surprised Aug. 17. and routed a battalion of Union cavalry, inflicting a loss of 30 killed and wounded and 111 prisoners; thence pushing on, making additional captures by the way, to Richmond, Ky.; thence falling back to rejoin Smith, who had not yet come up. The Cumberland Mountains are a broad range of table-land, some 2,000 feet in average height, descending
August 17th (search for this): chapter 10
ce of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to London, where it surprised Aug. 17. and routed a battalion of Union cavalry, inflicting a loss of 30 killed and wounded and 111 prisoners; thence pushing on, making additional captures by the way, to Richmond, Ky.; thence falling back to rejoin Smith, who had not yet come up. ither hand, and pierced by a single considerable pass — the Cumberland Gap — which had been for some time quietly held by a Union force under Gen. Geo. W. Morgan; who, on learning that he had thus been flanked, blew up his works and commenced Aug. 17. a precipitate race for the Ohio, which he in due time reached, having been constantly harassed, for most of the way, by John Morgan with 700 Rebel cavalry. Moving rapidly northward, Smith found himself confronted Aug. 29. at Richmond, Ky.
August 19th (search for this): chapter 10
uantities of plunder were thus obtained, while property of much greater value was destroyed; and enough recruits were doubtless gathered to offset the waste of war. Still, military operations, without a base and without regular supplies, seldom produce substantial, enduring results; and the Confederate guerrillas either soon abandoned Kentucky or concealed themselves and lay quiet therein. The leaders, with most of their followers, retired into Tennessee, where they captured Clarksville Aug. 19. and possessed themselves of ample military stores; and a sharp cavalry fight at Gallatin resulted in a Union defeat, with a loss of 30 killed, 50 wounded, and 75 prisoners. Gen. Buell had left Corinth in June, moving eastward, as if intent on Chattanooga; but Gen. Bragg--who had succeeded to the chief command of the Rebels confronting him — had thereupon moved more rapidly, on parallel roads, from Tupelo, Miss., through northern Alabama and Georgia, to Chattanooga, which he reached ahea
August 20th (search for this): chapter 10
ee vengeance and love of property were too powerful to make them take risks against these in favor of a cause for which their people had a mere preference, without any attachments to it higher than those of selfish calculation. The transfer of Gen. Halleck to Washington had left Gen. Grant in command of the district of West Tennessee, with his headquarters at Jackson or at Bolivar, while Gen. Rosecrans was left in command in northern Mississippi and Alabama, when Gen. Buell, taking Aug. 20. two of his divisions, moved northward in pursuit of Bragg. Rosecrans was at Tuscumbia when advised, About Sept. 1. by telegram from Gen. Grant, that a considerable Rebel force was moving northward between them, and that its cavalry had already attacked Bolivar, and cut the line of railroad between that post and Jackson. Hercupon, leaving Iuka in charge of Col. R. C. Murphy, 8th Wisconsin, Rosecrans moved castward with Stanley's division to his old encampment at Clear creek. seven mile
August 22nd (search for this): chapter 10
6 regiments of infantry, 5 of cavalry, and 40 guns, Bragg traversed the rugged mountain ridges which hem in the Sequatchie Valley, passing through Dunlap, Aug. 27. Pikeville, Aug. 30. Crossville, Sept. 1. masking his movement by a feint with cavalry on McMinnville, but rapidly withdrawing this when its purpose was accomplished, and pressing hurriedly northward, to Kentucky; which he entered on the 5th. Kirby Smith, with his division, from Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to L
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