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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Barbourville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ince they inflicted the greater loss, gained the more ground, and captured some cannon; yet it is plain that Bragg obtained here all the fighting he was anxious for; since he abandoned some 1,200 of his sick and wounded at Harrods-burg, and 25,000 barrels of pork, with other stores, at various points; making no stand even at Camp Dick Robinson — a very strong position, behind the perpendicular bluffs of Dick's river — but retreated precipitately by Crab Orchard, Mount Vernon, London, and Barboursville, to Cumberland Gap, and thus into East Tennessee; burning even large quantities of cloths and other precious goods, for which transportation over the rough mountain roads necessarily traversed was not to be had. The retreat was conducted by Bishop Polk, and covered by Wheeler's cavalry. And, though Kentucky was minus many thousands of animals, with other spoils of all kinds, by reason of this gigantic raid, it is not probable, in view of the inevitable suffering and loss of animals o
Richmond, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
y--Mississippi—Buell — Bragg — Rosecrans — Grant — Van Dorn.. Bragg crosses the Tennessee and Cumberland Kirby Smith routs M. D. Manson and Nelson at Richmond, Ky. Bragg captures 4,000 men at Munfordsville advances to Frankfort, and inaugurates Richard Hawes as Governor of Kentucky Buell follows him from the Tennessee routed a battalion of Union cavalry, inflicting a loss of 30 killed and wounded and 111 prisoners; thence pushing on, making additional captures by the way, to Richmond, Ky.; thence falling back to rejoin Smith, who had not yet come up. The Cumberland Mountains are a broad range of table-land, some 2,000 feet in average height, een constantly harassed, for most of the way, by John Morgan with 700 Rebel cavalry. Moving rapidly northward, Smith found himself confronted Aug. 29. at Richmond, Ky., by a green Union force, nearly equal in numbers to his own, under command of Brig.-Gen. M. D. Manson, who immediately pushed forward to engage him, taking
Tuscumbia (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
se in favor of a cause for which their people had a mere preference, without any attachments to it higher than those of selfish calculation. The transfer of Gen. Halleck to Washington had left Gen. Grant in command of the district of West Tennessee, with his headquarters at Jackson or at Bolivar, while Gen. Rosecrans was left in command in northern Mississippi and Alabama, when Gen. Buell, taking Aug. 20. two of his divisions, moved northward in pursuit of Bragg. Rosecrans was at Tuscumbia when advised, About Sept. 1. by telegram from Gen. Grant, that a considerable Rebel force was moving northward between them, and that its cavalry had already attacked Bolivar, and cut the line of railroad between that post and Jackson. Hercupon, leaving Iuka in charge of Col. R. C. Murphy, 8th Wisconsin, Rosecrans moved castward with Stanley's division to his old encampment at Clear creek. seven miles from Corinth. Murphy precipitately abandoned his post on the approach of the Rebel c
Washington, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
e been swelled by reenforcements, mainly raw, to nearly 100,000 men; but it was not, in his judgment, yet in condition to fight Bragg's far inferior numbers. Hence, time was taken to reorganize and supply it; while the Rebel cavalry galloped at will over the plenteous central districts of the State, collecting large quantities of cattle and hogs not only, but of serviceable fabrics and other manufactures as well. Buell's delays, synchronizing with McClellan's lost, were so distasteful at Washington, that an order relieving him from command was issued; but its execution was suspended on the emphatic remonstrance of his subordinate commanders. The hint being a pretty strong one, Buell set his face toward the enemy; Oct. 1. moving in five columns: his left on Frankfort, his right on Shepardsville, intending to concentrate on Bardstown, where Bragg, with his main body, was supposed to be; skirmishing by the way with small parties of Rebel cavalry and artillery. Thus advancing steadi
Danville, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
left flank; but they found no enemy to dispute their progress. Bragg had decamped during the night, marching on Harrodsburg; where he was joined by Kirby Smith and Withers; retreating thence southward by Bryantsville to Camp Dick Robinson, near Danville. Bragg admits a total loss in this battle of not less than 2,500; including Brig.-Gens. Wood, Cleburne, and Brown, wounded; and claims to have driven us two miles, captured 15 guns, 400 prisoners, and inflicted a total loss of 4,000. Buell's his rearguard near Lawrenceburg — reached Perryville at nightfall on the 11th; up to which time Buell had made no decided advance. Pushing forward a strong reconnoissance next day to Dick's river, he found no enemy this side; and he learned at Danville, two days later, that Bragg was in full retreat. He sent forward in pursuit at midnight Wood's division, followed by the rest of Crittenden's and then by McCook's corps, while Gilbert's marched on the Lancaster road to the left. Wood struck th
Carthage, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
r Louisville, which seemed for a few days to lie at his mercy; though considerable numbers, mainly of militia and very green volunteers, had been hastily gathered for the defense of the former, and were busily employed in erecting defenses covering the Kentucky approaches to that city, at some distance back from the Ohio. Gen. Bragg had now completely flanked Buell's left, and passed behind him, without a struggle and without loss, keeping well eastward of Nashville, and advancing by Carthage, Tenn., and Glasgow, Ky.; first striking the Louisville and Nashville Railroad--which was our main line of supply and reenforcement — after he entered Kentucky. Sept. 5. His advance, under Gen. J. R. Chalmers, first encountered Sept. 13. a considerable force at Munfordsville, where the railroad crosses Green river, and where Col. J. T. Wilder, with about 2,100 men, had assumed command five days before, by order of Gen. J. T. Boyle, commanding, in Kentucky, and had hastily thrown up forti
Iuka (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ky by Cumberland Gap Rosecrans fights Price at Iuka Price retreats to Ripley, Miss. Van Dorn assatween that post and Jackson. Hercupon, leaving Iuka in charge of Col. R. C. Murphy, 8th Wisconsin, the hands of the enemy. A reconnoissance in Iuka. force, under Col. Mower, having satisfied Ros 5,000 men, to Burnsville, seven miles west of Iuka, and following from Bolivar with such troops as be spared to reenforce him. Ord was to move on Iuka from the north; while Rosecrans, with Stanley'ssville, was advised that Rosecrans would attack Iuka, 19 1/2 miles from Jacinto, between 2 1/2 and 4ising Gen. Grant; and was within 7 1/2 miles of Iuka at noon, having been driving in the enemy's skiivision in front — up to a point two miles from Iuka, where a cross-road connected that from Jacintohim a dense smoke arising from the direction of Iuka; whence he inferred that Price was burning his ans — having first sent Stanley's division into Iuka and found it abandoned — turned on the trail of[8 more...
Lancaster, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
kfort, and had had a little fight with his rearguard near Lawrenceburg — reached Perryville at nightfall on the 11th; up to which time Buell had made no decided advance. Pushing forward a strong reconnoissance next day to Dick's river, he found no enemy this side; and he learned at Danville, two days later, that Bragg was in full retreat. He sent forward in pursuit at midnight Wood's division, followed by the rest of Crittenden's and then by McCook's corps, while Gilbert's marched on the Lancaster road to the left. Wood struck the Rebel rearguard next morning at Stanford, but to little purpose; the enemy retiring when assailed in force, felling trees across the road behind him, and consuming all the forage of the region he traversed, rendering extended pursuit impossible. McCook's and Gilbert's divisions were halted at Crab Orchard; while Crittenden kept on to London, whence lie was recalled by Buell; farther pursuit being evidently useless. The Government, deeply dissatisfied wi
Jacksonboro (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
tanooga, with 36 regiments of infantry, 5 of cavalry, and 40 guns, Bragg traversed the rugged mountain ridges which hem in the Sequatchie Valley, passing through Dunlap, Aug. 27. Pikeville, Aug. 30. Crossville, Sept. 1. masking his movement by a feint with cavalry on McMinnville, but rapidly withdrawing this when its purpose was accomplished, and pressing hurriedly northward, to Kentucky; which he entered on the 5th. Kirby Smith, with his division, from Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somer
Kingston (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n the 5th. Kirby Smith, with his division, from Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to London, where it surprised Aug. 17. and routed a battalion of Union cavalry, inflicting a loss of 30 killed and wounded and 111 prisoners; thence pushing on, making additional captures by the way, to Richmond, Ky.; thence falling back to rejoin Smith, who had not yet come up. The Cumberland Mountains are a broad range of table-land, some 2,000 feet in average height, descending sharply to the upp
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