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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Fort Hamilton (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
eparate roads, which precluded their reciprocal support, but advanced slowly — Hamilton's division in front — up to a point two miles from Iuka, where a cross-road cod Col. J. B. Sanborn, who had bravely and skillfully directed the movements of Hamilton's two brigades; but not a regiment of Stanley's division, save the 11th Missouour inner intrenchments, and ordered to close with his right on Davies's left; Hamilton's division was moved down until its left touched Davies's right; while Stanleyound the wings. The 56th yells again and pursues. The Rebels do not stop. Hamilton's veterans, meantime, have been working quietly — no lung-work, but gun-work ehis is one of the apocrypha of battle. A Rebel soldier says it s truth. But Hamilton's division receded under orders — at backward step; slowly, grimly, face to thcenter, Davies's division gave way, but speedily rallied, and, with the aid of Hamilton's division and a cross-fire from battery Robinett, poured in a fire so destru
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
eir people had a mere preference, without any attachments to it higher than those of selfish calculation. The transfer of Gen. Halleck to Washington had left Gen. Grant in command of the district of West Tennessee, with his headquarters at Jackson or at Bolivar, while Gen. Rosecrans was left in command in northern Mississippi and Alabama, when Gen. Buell, taking Aug. 20. two of his divisions, moved northward in pursuit of Bragg. Rosecrans was at Tuscumbia when advised, About Sept. at least storm, Corinth next day. Rosecrans — who had received Sept. 20. his promotion to a Major-Generalship directly after the affair at Iuka — had been left in chief command at Corinth by Grant, who had returned to his own headquarters at Jackson, withdrawing Ord's division to Bolivar. Rosecrans had in and about Corinth not far from 20,000 men — too few to man the extensive works constructed around it by Beauregard, when lie held that position against Halleck's besieging army. Realizin<
Henderson, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
es, and clutching whatever property could be made useful in war, had been for some time current; when at length a bolder blow was struck in the capture July 5, 1862. of Lebanon, Ky. [not Tenn.], and almost simultaneously of Murfreesboroa, Tenn., which Forrest surprised; making prisoners of Brig.-Gens. Duffield and Crittenden, of Ind., with the 9th Michigan, 3d Minnesota, 4 companies of the 4th Ky. cavalry, and 3 companies of the 7th Pa. cavalry, after a spirited but brief resistance. Henderson, Ky., on the Ohio, was likewise seized by a guerrilla band, who clutched a large amount of hospital stores; and, being piloted across by some Indiana traitors, captured a hospital also at Newburg, Ind., and paroled its helpless inmates. Col. John Morgan likewise captured July 2. Cynthiana, in north-eastern Kentucky; but was run off directly by a superior cavalry force under Gen. Green Clay Smith. Morgan claims in his report to have captured and paroled 1,200 Union soldiers during this ra
Stanford, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ched Perryville at nightfall on the 11th; up to which time Buell had made no decided advance. Pushing forward a strong reconnoissance next day to Dick's river, he found no enemy this side; and he learned at Danville, two days later, that Bragg was in full retreat. He sent forward in pursuit at midnight Wood's division, followed by the rest of Crittenden's and then by McCook's corps, while Gilbert's marched on the Lancaster road to the left. Wood struck the Rebel rearguard next morning at Stanford, but to little purpose; the enemy retiring when assailed in force, felling trees across the road behind him, and consuming all the forage of the region he traversed, rendering extended pursuit impossible. McCook's and Gilbert's divisions were halted at Crab Orchard; while Crittenden kept on to London, whence lie was recalled by Buell; farther pursuit being evidently useless. The Government, deeply dissatisfied with this impotent conclusion of the campaign, now relieved Oct. 30. Buell f
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
lan's Richmond campaign having proved abortive, while conscription had largely replenished the Rebel ranks, Bragg was impelled to try a bold stroke for the recovery of Tennessee and the liberation of Kentucky. As with Lee's kindred advance into Maryland, the increasing scarcity of food was the more immediate, while fond expectations of a general rising in support of the Confederate cause, afforded the remoter incitement to this step. Louisville, with its immense resources, was the immediate obate were meager and sentimental, and amounted to but little practical aid of our cause. Indeed, no subject was at once more dispiriting and perplexing to the South than the cautions and unmanly reception given to our armies both in Kentucky and Maryland. The references we have made to the sentiment of each of these States leaves but little room to doubt the general conclusion, that the dread of Yankee vengeance and love of property were too powerful to make them take risks against these in fav
Big Creek Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s, Bragg traversed the rugged mountain ridges which hem in the Sequatchie Valley, passing through Dunlap, Aug. 27. Pikeville, Aug. 30. Crossville, Sept. 1. masking his movement by a feint with cavalry on McMinnville, but rapidly withdrawing this when its purpose was accomplished, and pressing hurriedly northward, to Kentucky; which he entered on the 5th. Kirby Smith, with his division, from Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to London, where it surprised Aug. 17. and routed
Rodgersville (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ible. Here he had a smart skirmish with the Rebel advance, and drove it back; which prompted him to quit his strong position for one still farther advanced, at Rogersville, where his men slept on their arms that night. Next morning, he advanced half a mile farther, and here engaged Smith's entire command, with no chance of succesthis defeat; but he had three more regiments coming up as our line gave way. Using two of these as a rear-guard, Manson attempted to halt and reform just beyond Rogersville; but soon saw that this would not answer, and again retired to the position wherefrom he had commenced the fight the evening before, and which he ought not to hich came entirely too late: the exultant Rebels being close upon him, and opening fire along their whole line within five minutes afterward. The fight beyond Rogersville had been maintained through three hours; here an hour sufficed to end it. Again our right was charged and routed, compelling a general retreat; and again — havi
Mowers (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
em. They were separated by a space riot exceeding one hundred and fifty yards. The Ohio brigade, commanded by Col. Fuller, was formed behind the ridge, on the right of the redoubts. The left of the 63d Ohio rested on Fort Robinett, its right joining the left of the 27th Ohio; the 39th was behind the 27th, supporting it; the right of the 43d joined the left of the 63d, forming a right angle with it, and extending to Fort Williams, behind the crest of the ridge. The 11th Missouri, Col. Mower (U. S. A.), was formed behind the 63d Ohio, its left in the angle, and the regiment faced obliquely to the right of the 63d. The positions of these gallant regiments should be described, because their actions are memorable. Col. Fuller, perfectly collected, required his brigade to lie flat on their faces when not engaged. While the enemy was steadily approaching, he warned them to wait till they could see the whites of their eyes, then fire coolly. It was at the moment the Texan Rogers was f
Montgomery (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
th his division, from Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to London, where it surprised Aug. 17. and routed a battalion of Union cavalry, inflicting a loss of 30 killed and wounded and 111 prisoners; thence pushing on, making additional captures by the way, to Richmond, Ky.; thence falling back to rejoin Smith, who had not yet come up. The Cumberland Mountains are a broad range of table-land, some 2,000 feet in average height, descending sharply to the upper waters of the Tennessee and
Ripley (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
le of Perryville Bragg retreats out of Kentucky by Cumberland Gap Rosecrans fights Price at Iuka Price retreats to Ripley, Miss. Van Dorn assails Rosecrans at Corinth is beaten off with great slaughter Van Dorn pursued to Ripley losses. Thuipments and stores. Pollard says that the Rebel loss was probably 800 in killed and wounded. Price retreated to Ripley, Miss., where lie united with a still stronger Rebel force, under Van Dorn, who had been menacing Corinth during the conflich, burning the bridge behind him. McPherson rebuilt the bridge and crossed next day; Oct. 6. continuing the pursuit to Ripley, followed by Rosecrans with most of his army, gathering up deserters and stragglers by the way. Rosecrans was anxiously e could not take away on the first train. I had eighty wagon-loads of assorted rations which had reached me that night at Ripley, and had ordered the 30,000 from Chewalla to Hurlbut. believing the Rebel army utterly demoralized and incapable of resi
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