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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Shepardsville (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
llecting large quantities of cattle and hogs not only, but of serviceable fabrics and other manufactures as well. Buell's delays, synchronizing with McClellan's lost, were so distasteful at Washington, that an order relieving him from command was issued; but its execution was suspended on the emphatic remonstrance of his subordinate commanders. The hint being a pretty strong one, Buell set his face toward the enemy; Oct. 1. moving in five columns: his left on Frankfort, his right on Shepardsville, intending to concentrate on Bardstown, where Bragg, with his main body, was supposed to be; skirmishing by the way with small parties of Rebel cavalry and artillery. Thus advancing steadily, though not rapidly, he passed through Bardstown, and thence to Springfield, Oct. 6. 62 miles from Louisville; Bragg slowly retreating before him, harassing rather than resisting his advance, so as to gain time for the escape of his now immense trains, consisting mainly of captured Federal army w
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
s of 30 killed, 50 wounded, and 75 prisoners. Gen. Buell had left Corinth in June, moving eastward, as if intent on Chattanooga; but Gen. Bragg--who had succeeded to the chief command of the Rebels confronting him — had thereupon moved more rapidly, on parallel roads, from Tupelo, Miss., through northern Alabama and Georgia, to Chattanooga, which he reached ahead of Buell's vanguard. Bragg's army had been swelled by conscription to some 45,000 men, organized in three corps, under Hardee, Bshop Polk, and Kirby Smith respectively, whereof the last was sent to Knoxville, while the two former sufficed to hold Chattanooga against any effort which Buell was likely to make. McClellan's Richmond campaign having proved abortive, while consncinnati was thought to be also within its purview. Crossing Aug. 24. the Tennessee at Harrison, a few miles above Chattanooga, with 36 regiments of infantry, 5 of cavalry, and 40 guns, Bragg traversed the rugged mountain ridges which hem in the
Jamestown (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rom Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to London, where it surprised Aug. 17. and routed a battalion of Union cavalry, inflicting a loss of 30 killed and wounded and 111 prisoners; thence pushing on, making additional captures by the way, to Richmond, Ky.; thence falling back to rejoin Smith, who had not yet come up. The Cumberland Mountains are a broad range of table-land, some 2,000 feet in average height, descending sharply to the upper waters of the Tennessee and Cumberland on eit
Blackland (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
nition wagons and caissons; their men throwing away their camp and garrison equipage in the flight. The weather was cool; the roads were dry, and likely to be so for a month to come. Corn was ripe, and, as yet, untouched. We had 3,000,000 of rations in Corinth, and ammunition for six months. There was but one bridge injured on the Mobile and Ohio road; and it could be put in running order by a regiment in half a day. The enemy were so alarmed that, when Hamilton sent a reconnoissance to Blackland, they vacated Tupelo, burning even the bacon which they could not take away on the first train. I had eighty wagon-loads of assorted rations which had reached me that night at Ripley, and had ordered the 30,000 from Chewalla to Hurlbut. believing the Rebel army utterly demoralized and incapable of resistance; but he was directed to desist and return to Corinth. Nine days after his return, he was relieved from his command at Corinth, and ordered to report at Cincinnati; where he found a
Crab Orchard, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
nd wounded at Harrods-burg, and 25,000 barrels of pork, with other stores, at various points; making no stand even at Camp Dick Robinson — a very strong position, behind the perpendicular bluffs of Dick's river — but retreated precipitately by Crab Orchard, Mount Vernon, London, and Barboursville, to Cumberland Gap, and thus into East Tennessee; burning even large quantities of cloths and other precious goods, for which transportation over the rough mountain roads necessarily traversed was not tttle purpose; the enemy retiring when assailed in force, felling trees across the road behind him, and consuming all the forage of the region he traversed, rendering extended pursuit impossible. McCook's and Gilbert's divisions were halted at Crab Orchard; while Crittenden kept on to London, whence lie was recalled by Buell; farther pursuit being evidently useless. The Government, deeply dissatisfied with this impotent conclusion of the campaign, now relieved Oct. 30. Buell from command, ap
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
berland Kirby Smith routs M. D. Manson and Nelson at Richmond, Ky. Bragg captures 4,000 men at Munfordsville advances to Frankfort, and inaugurates Richard Hawes as Governor of Kentucky Buell follows him from the Tennessee to Bardstown and Springfield battle of Perryville Bragg retreats out of Kentucky by Cumberland Gap Rosecrans fights Price at Iuka Price retreats to Ripley, Miss. Van Dorn assails Rosecrans at Corinth is beaten off with great slaughter Van Dorn pursued to Ripley loo concentrate on Bardstown, where Bragg, with his main body, was supposed to be; skirmishing by the way with small parties of Rebel cavalry and artillery. Thus advancing steadily, though not rapidly, he passed through Bardstown, and thence to Springfield, Oct. 6. 62 miles from Louisville; Bragg slowly retreating before him, harassing rather than resisting his advance, so as to gain time for the escape of his now immense trains, consisting mainly of captured Federal army wagons, heavily lade
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
l had left Corinth in June, moving eastward, as if intent on Chattanooga; but Gen. Bragg--who had succeeded to the chief command of the Rebels confronting him — had thereupon moved more rapidly, on parallel roads, from Tupelo, Miss., through northern Alabama and Georgia, to Chattanooga, which he reached ahead of Buell's vanguard. Bragg's army had been swelled by conscription to some 45,000 men, organized in three corps, under Hardee, Bishop Polk, and Kirby Smith respectively, whereof the last w calculation. The transfer of Gen. Halleck to Washington had left Gen. Grant in command of the district of West Tennessee, with his headquarters at Jackson or at Bolivar, while Gen. Rosecrans was left in command in northern Mississippi and Alabama, when Gen. Buell, taking Aug. 20. two of his divisions, moved northward in pursuit of Bragg. Rosecrans was at Tuscumbia when advised, About Sept. 1. by telegram from Gen. Grant, that a considerable Rebel force was moving northward between
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ee, where they captured Clarksville Aug. 19. and possessed themselves of ample military stores; and a sharp cavalry fight at Gallatin resulted in a Union defeat, with a loss of 30 killed, 50 wounded, and 75 prisoners. Gen. Buell had left Corinth in June, moving eastward, as if intent on Chattanooga; but Gen. Bragg--who had succeeded to the chief command of the Rebels confronting him — had thereupon moved more rapidly, on parallel roads, from Tupelo, Miss., through northern Alabama and Georgia, to Chattanooga, which he reached ahead of Buell's vanguard. Bragg's army had been swelled by conscription to some 45,000 men, organized in three corps, under Hardee, Bishop Polk, and Kirby Smith respectively, whereof the last was sent to Knoxville, while the two former sufficed to hold Chattanooga against any effort which Buell was likely to make. McClellan's Richmond campaign having proved abortive, while conscription had largely replenished the Rebel ranks, Bragg was impelled to try
Fulton, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ept. 19. when he was directed by Grant to move his entire force — which had been swelled by the arrival of Ross's division — to within four miles of Iuka, and there await the sound of Rosecrans's guns. Ross, in his advance, reported to him a dense smoke arising from the direction of Iuka; whence he inferred that Price was burning his stores and preparing to retreat. Next morning, hearing guns in his front, Ord moved rapidly into Iuka, but found no enemy there; Price having retreated on the Fulton road during the night. Ord, leaving Crock er's brigade to garrison Iuka, returned directly, by order, to Corinth; while Rosecrans — having first sent Stanley's division into Iuka and found it abandoned — turned on the trail of the Rebels, and followed until night; but found they had too much start to be overtaken. Hamilton reports that, in this affair of Iuka, not more than 2,800 men on our side were actually engaged, against a Rebel force of 11,000, holding a chosen and very strong pos
Newburgh, Warrick County, Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
and almost simultaneously of Murfreesboroa, Tenn., which Forrest surprised; making prisoners of Brig.-Gens. Duffield and Crittenden, of Ind., with the 9th Michigan, 3d Minnesota, 4 companies of the 4th Ky. cavalry, and 3 companies of the 7th Pa. cavalry, after a spirited but brief resistance. Henderson, Ky., on the Ohio, was likewise seized by a guerrilla band, who clutched a large amount of hospital stores; and, being piloted across by some Indiana traitors, captured a hospital also at Newburg, Ind., and paroled its helpless inmates. Col. John Morgan likewise captured July 2. Cynthiana, in north-eastern Kentucky; but was run off directly by a superior cavalry force under Gen. Green Clay Smith. Morgan claims in his report to have captured and paroled 1,200 Union soldiers during this raid, with a total loss of but 90 of his men. Large quantities of plunder were thus obtained, while property of much greater value was destroyed; and enough recruits were doubtless gathered to offset
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