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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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Trenton (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
otorious. Horse-stealing — in fact, stealing in general — in the name and behalf of Liberty and Patriotism, is apt to increase in popularity so long as it is practiced with impunity; and the horses of Kentucky are eminently calculated to inflame the love of country glowing in the breast of every cavalier. Burning bridges, and clutching whatever property could be made useful in war, had been for some time current; when at length a bolder blow was struck in the capture July 5, 1862. of Lebanon, Ky. [not Tenn.], and almost simultaneously of Murfreesboroa, Tenn., which Forrest surprised; making prisoners of Brig.-Gens. Duffield and Crittenden, of Ind., with the 9th Michigan, 3d Minnesota, 4 companies of the 4th Ky. cavalry, and 3 companies of the 7th Pa. cavalry, after a spirited but brief resistance. Henderson, Ky., on the Ohio, was likewise seized by a guerrilla band, who clutched a large amount of hospital stores; and, being piloted across by some Indiana traitors, captured a hosp
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
in erecting defenses covering the Kentucky approaches to that city, at some distance back from the Ohio. Gen. Bragg had now completely flanked Buell's left, and passed behind him, without a struggle and without loss, keeping well eastward of Nashville, and advancing by Carthage, Tenn., and Glasgow, Ky.; first striking the Louisville and Nashville Railroad--which was our main line of supply and reenforcement — after he entered Kentucky. Sept. 5. His advance, under Gen. J. R. Chalmers, firsof Kentucky. This ceremony, says Pollard, was scarcely more than a pretentious farce: hardly was it completed when the Yankees threatened Frankfort; and the newly installed Governor had to flee from their approach. Gen. Buell, after leaving Nashville Sept. 15. strongly garrisoned, had marched directly for Louisville, 170 miles; where his army arrived between the 25th and 29th. It had by this time been swelled by reenforcements, mainly raw, to nearly 100,000 men; but it was not, in his j
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Confederate cause, afforded the remoter incitement to this step. Louisville, with its immense resources, was the immediate object of this gigantic raid, though Cincinnati was thought to be also within its purview. Crossing Aug. 24. the Tennessee at Harrison, a few miles above Chattanooga, with 36 regiments of infantry, 5 of ccclamations of the numerous Rebel sympathizers of that intensely pro-Slavery region. He moved on through Paris to Cynthiana, within striking distance of either Cincinnati or Louisville, which seemed for a few days to lie at his mercy; though considerable numbers, mainly of militia and very green volunteers, had been hastily gatheistance; but he was directed to desist and return to Corinth. Nine days after his return, he was relieved from his command at Corinth, and ordered to report at Cincinnati; where he found a dispatch directing him to supersede Gen. Buell in command of the Army of the Ohio and Department of the Cumberland, including all of Tennessee
Mount Vernon (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
t have been still better, since they inflicted the greater loss, gained the more ground, and captured some cannon; yet it is plain that Bragg obtained here all the fighting he was anxious for; since he abandoned some 1,200 of his sick and wounded at Harrods-burg, and 25,000 barrels of pork, with other stores, at various points; making no stand even at Camp Dick Robinson — a very strong position, behind the perpendicular bluffs of Dick's river — but retreated precipitately by Crab Orchard, Mount Vernon, London, and Barboursville, to Cumberland Gap, and thus into East Tennessee; burning even large quantities of cloths and other precious goods, for which transportation over the rough mountain roads necessarily traversed was not to be had. The retreat was conducted by Bishop Polk, and covered by Wheeler's cavalry. And, though Kentucky was minus many thousands of animals, with other spoils of all kinds, by reason of this gigantic raid, it is not probable, in view of the inevitable suffe
Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ragg captures 4,000 men at Munfordsville advances to Frankfort, and inaugurates Richard Hawes as Governor of Kentucky Buell follows him from the Tennessee to Bardstown and Springfield battle of Perryville Bragg retreats out of Kentucky by Cumberland Gap Rosecrans fights Price at Iuka Price retreats to Ripley, Miss. Van Dorn assails Rosecrans at Corinth is beaten off with great slaughter Van Dorn pursued to Ripley losses. The comatose condition into which the war on the Tennessee hadh other stores, at various points; making no stand even at Camp Dick Robinson — a very strong position, behind the perpendicular bluffs of Dick's river — but retreated precipitately by Crab Orchard, Mount Vernon, London, and Barboursville, to Cumberland Gap, and thus into East Tennessee; burning even large quantities of cloths and other precious goods, for which transportation over the rough mountain roads necessarily traversed was not to be had. The retreat was conducted by Bishop Polk, and
Bryantsville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ield at nightfall, when a single brigade (Wagner's) went into action on the right of Mitchell's division, just before the battle was terminated by darkness. At 6 A. M. next day, Oct. 9. Gilbert's corps advanced by order to assail the Rebel front, while Crittenden struck hard on his left flank; but they found no enemy to dispute their progress. Bragg had decamped during the night, marching on Harrodsburg; where he was joined by Kirby Smith and Withers; retreating thence southward by Bryantsville to Camp Dick Robinson, near Danville. Bragg admits a total loss in this battle of not less than 2,500; including Brig.-Gens. Wood, Cleburne, and Brown, wounded; and claims to have driven us two miles, captured 15 guns, 400 prisoners, and inflicted a total loss of 4,000. Buell's report admits a loss on our part of 4,348--916 killed, 2,943 wounded, and 489 missing; but as to guns, lie concedes a loss of but ten, whereof all but two were left on the ground, with more than 1,000 of their
Jacksboro (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
The enemy still pressed onward undismayed. At last, they reached the crest of the hill in front and to the right of Fort Richardson, and Gen. Davies's division gave way. It began to fall back in disorder. Gen. Rosecrans, who had been watching the in restoring it, and the men, brave when bravely led, fought again. But it had yielded much space; and the loss of Fort Richardson was certain. Price's right moved swiftly to the headquarters of Gen. Rosecrans, took possession of it, and posted teve now-bullets have punctured it so well. But the desperadoes got no farther into town. Battle was raging about Fort Richardson. Gallant Richardson, for whom it was named, fought his battery well. Had his supports fought as his artillerymen drranged to carry Corinth by one grand assault. In their reconnoissance Friday evening, they had found no fort where Fort Richardson was, and they overlooked Fort Robinett. Ugly obstacles. When they drove their wedge toward Corinth, one flange on
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
, and tumbled headlong into the ditch. A patriot's bullet had killed him in the moment of triumph. Five Texans who followed pitched forward through the embrasures like logs, and fell into the fort. But we anticipate. Remember that the two redoubts are on the same ridge: Fort Williams commanding Fort Robinett, which is in front. Had the Rebels taken the latter, the guns of the former would have destroyed them. They were separated by a space riot exceeding one hundred and fifty yards. The Ohio brigade, commanded by Col. Fuller, was formed behind the ridge, on the right of the redoubts. The left of the 63d Ohio rested on Fort Robinett, its right joining the left of the 27th Ohio; the 39th was behind the 27th, supporting it; the right of the 43d joined the left of the 63d, forming a right angle with it, and extending to Fort Williams, behind the crest of the ridge. The 11th Missouri, Col. Mower (U. S. A.), was formed behind the 63d Ohio, its left in the angle, and the regiment fa
Paris, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
but 5,000; and states his total loss at 400, and ours at 1,000 killed and wounded, 5,000 prisoners, 9 guns, 10,000 small arms, and large spoil of munitions and provisions. It is quite probable that his story, though exaggerated, is nearer the truth than Manson's. Smith set forward directly Sept. 1. for Lexington, which he entered in triumph three days afterward, amid the frantic acclamations of the numerous Rebel sympathizers of that intensely pro-Slavery region. He moved on through Paris to Cynthiana, within striking distance of either Cincinnati or Louisville, which seemed for a few days to lie at his mercy; though considerable numbers, mainly of militia and very green volunteers, had been hastily gathered for the defense of the former, and were busily employed in erecting defenses covering the Kentucky approaches to that city, at some distance back from the Ohio. Gen. Bragg had now completely flanked Buell's left, and passed behind him, without a struggle and without lo
Somerset, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
rough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to London, where it surprised Aug. 17. and routed a battalion of Union cavalry, inflicting a loss of 30 killed and wounded and 111 prisoners; thence pushing on, making additional captures by the way, to Richmond, Ky.; thence falling back to rejoin Smith, who had not yet come up. The Cumberland Mountains are a broad range of table-land, some 2,000 feet in average height, descending sharply to the upper waters of the Tennessee and Cumberland on either hand, and pierced by a single c
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