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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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M. D. Manson (search for this): chapter 10
the Tennessee and Cumberland Kirby Smith routs M. D. Manson and Nelson at Richmond, Ky. Bragg captures 4,00ual in numbers to his own, under command of Brig.-Gen. M. D. Manson, who immediately pushed forward to engage h line gave way. Using two of these as a rear-guard, Manson attempted to halt and reform just beyond Rogersvill; and again — having been driven back to his camp — Manson was trying to reform and make head, when, Gen. Nels prepare for and intercept the expected fugitives. Manson, who had resumed command when Nelson fell, had formeeing rabble were halted by a body of Rebel horse. Manson, hurrying up, attempted to form a vanguard; but onlvery one attempting to save himself as he could. Gen. Manson, with other officers, attempting escape by flightmany if not most of his compatriots in disaster. Manson's report says that his entire force this day did nostory, though exaggerated, is nearer the truth than Manson's. Smith set forward directly Sept. 1. for Le
Arthur B. Fuller (search for this): chapter 10
illiams commanding Fort Robinett, which is in front. Had the Rebels taken the latter, the guns of the former would have destroyed them. They were separated by a space riot exceeding one hundred and fifty yards. The Ohio brigade, commanded by Col. Fuller, was formed behind the ridge, on the right of the redoubts. The left of the 63d Ohio rested on Fort Robinett, its right joining the left of the 27th Ohio; the 39th was behind the 27th, supporting it; the right of the 43d joined the left of thuri, Col. Mower (U. S. A.), was formed behind the 63d Ohio, its left in the angle, and the regiment faced obliquely to the right of the 63d. The positions of these gallant regiments should be described, because their actions are memorable. Col. Fuller, perfectly collected, required his brigade to lie flat on their faces when not engaged. While the enemy was steadily approaching, he warned them to wait till they could see the whites of their eyes, then fire coolly. It was at the moment the
ad orders to hold it pretty firmly, so as to compel the enemy to develop his strength. Rosecrans, still distrusting that this attack was more than a feint, designed Corinth. to cover a movement on Bolivar and Jackson, at 9 o'clock sent Gen. McArthur to the front, who reported widespread but slack skirmishing, and said the hill was of great value to test the strength of our assailants. McArthur, finding himself hotly assailed, called up four more regiments from McKean's division, and conMcArthur, finding himself hotly assailed, called up four more regiments from McKean's division, and continued what by this time had become a serious engagement, until a determined Rebel charge, interposing be.tween his right and the left of Gen. Davies, forced him rapidly back from the hill, with the loss of 2 heavy guns; thus compelling a slight recoil of Davies also. By 1 P. M., it had become evident that the attack was no feint, but meant the capture of Corinth, with its immense stores; and that success was to be struggled for right here. Accordingly, McKean's division, on our left, was dr
W. H. Lytle (search for this): chapter 10
tired to replenish their cartridge-boxes; then resuming their position in line. Rousseau's center and right were held respectively by the brigades of Harris and Lytle, who fought bravely, but lost ground, in consequence of the disaster on our farther left. Finally, a desperate charge was made upon Lytle's front and right, favorLytle's front and right, favored by irregularities of ground, which covered and concealed it, and his brigade was hurled back; Lytle himself falling at this moment, and, believing his wound mortal, refusing to be carried off the field. The charging Rebels now struck the left flank of Gilbert's corps, held by R. B. Mitchell and Sheridan, which had been for soLytle himself falling at this moment, and, believing his wound mortal, refusing to be carried off the field. The charging Rebels now struck the left flank of Gilbert's corps, held by R. B. Mitchell and Sheridan, which had been for some little time engaged along its front. The key of its position was held — and of course well held — by Brig.-Gen. Philip H. Sheridan, who had been engaged in the morning, but had driven the enemy back out of sight, after a short but sharp contest, and had just repelled another assault on his front, advancing his line as his assai
Edward D. Baker (search for this): chapter 10
son; numbering, according to their own authority, 38,000 men. which he makes less than 20,000 in all. He says, in his testimony before the Committee on the Conduct of the War: Our own force in the fight was about 15,700 infantry and artillery, and about 2,500 effective cavalry. Among his trophies were 14 flags, 2 guns, 3,300 small arms, &c.; while the Rebels, in their retreat, blew up many ammunition and other wagons, and left the ground strewn with tents, accouterments, &c. Among our killed were Gen. Pleasant A. Hackleman, Repeatedly a Whig candidate for Congress in the Franklin district, Indiana. Col. Thomas Kilby Smith, 43d Ohio, and Cols. Thrush, Baker, and Miles; while Gen. Richard J. Oglesby, Since elected Governor of Illinois. Adjt.-Gen. Clark, of Rosecrans's staff, and Col. Mower, 11th Missouri, were among the severely wounded. On the Rebel side, Acting Brigadiers Rogers, Johnston, and Martin were killed, and Cols. Pritchard, Daily, and McClain were wounded.
Philip H. Sheridan (search for this): chapter 10
ek, whence a little bad water was obtained. This attempt was defeated by sending up the divisions of Gens. Mitchell and Sheridan, to hold the ground until our two flank corps should arrive; which the left, Gen. A. D. McCook, did between 10 and 11 A.e carried off the field. The charging Rebels now struck the left flank of Gilbert's corps, held by R. B. Mitchell and Sheridan, which had been for some little time engaged along its front. The key of its position was held — and of course well held — by Brig.-Gen. Philip H. Sheridan, who had been engaged in the morning, but had driven the enemy back out of sight, after a short but sharp contest, and had just repelled another assault on his front, advancing his line as his assailants retired,he force which had just driven Rousseau's right. And now Gen. Mitchell pushed forward the 31st brigade, Col. Carlin, on Sheridan's right, and charged at double-quick, breaking and driving the enemy into and through Perryville, to the protection of t
. Murphy precipitately abandoned his post on the approach of the Rebel cavalry, allowing a large amount of stores, with 680 barrels of flour, to fall into the hands of the enemy. A reconnoissance in Iuka. force, under Col. Mower, having satisfied Rosecrans that the Rebel army under Gen. Price now occupied luka, he so advised Gen. Grant; who there-upon resolved on a combined attack, sending down Gen. Ord, with some 5,000 men, to Burnsville, seven miles west of Iuka, and following from Bolivar with such troops as could be spared to reenforce him. Ord was to move on Iuka from the north; while Rosecrans, with Stanley's, was to rejoin his remaining division, under Hamilton, at Jacinto, nine miles south of Burnsville, thence advancing on Price from the south. This concentration was duly effected; Sept. 18. and Gen. Grant, who had now reached Burnsville, was advised that Rosecrans would attack Iuka, 19 1/2 miles from Jacinto, between 2 1/2 and 4 1/2 P. M. next day. Rosecrans m
Don Carlos Buell (search for this): chapter 10
gurates Richard Hawes as Governor of Kentucky Buell follows him from the Tennessee to Bardstown an 30 killed, 50 wounded, and 75 prisoners. Gen. Buell had left Corinth in June, moving eastward, ad to hold Chattanooga against any effort which Buell was likely to make. McClellan's Richmond caOhio. Gen. Bragg had now completely flanked Buell's left, and passed behind him, without a strugin a flag of truce, demanding a surrender. As Buell was not at hand, nor likely to be, and as therGovernor had to flee from their approach. Gen. Buell, after leaving Nashville Sept. 15. strongeable fabrics and other manufactures as well. Buell's delays, synchronizing with McClellan's lost,avily laden with the spoils of Kentucky. Here Buell learned that Kirby Smith had crossed the Kentul. D. McCook, which had been pushed forward by Buell on his immediate front to cover some hollows ille at nightfall on the 11th; up to which time Buell had made no decided advance. Pushing forward [11 more...]
September 13th (search for this): chapter 10
covering the Kentucky approaches to that city, at some distance back from the Ohio. Gen. Bragg had now completely flanked Buell's left, and passed behind him, without a struggle and without loss, keeping well eastward of Nashville, and advancing by Carthage, Tenn., and Glasgow, Ky.; first striking the Louisville and Nashville Railroad--which was our main line of supply and reenforcement — after he entered Kentucky. Sept. 5. His advance, under Gen. J. R. Chalmers, first encountered Sept. 13. a considerable force at Munfordsville, where the railroad crosses Green river, and where Col. J. T. Wilder, with about 2,100 men, had assumed command five days before, by order of Gen. J. T. Boyle, commanding, in Kentucky, and had hastily thrown up fortifications, with intent to dispute the passage of the river. Chalmers had already sent a mounted force to the north of Munfordsville, by which a first demand for surrender was made at 8 P. M. The demand being repelled, an assault was made a
September 18th (search for this): chapter 10
he so advised Gen. Grant; who there-upon resolved on a combined attack, sending down Gen. Ord, with some 5,000 men, to Burnsville, seven miles west of Iuka, and following from Bolivar with such troops as could be spared to reenforce him. Ord was to move on Iuka from the north; while Rosecrans, with Stanley's, was to rejoin his remaining division, under Hamilton, at Jacinto, nine miles south of Burnsville, thence advancing on Price from the south. This concentration was duly effected; Sept. 18. and Gen. Grant, who had now reached Burnsville, was advised that Rosecrans would attack Iuka, 19 1/2 miles from Jacinto, between 2 1/2 and 4 1/2 P. M. next day. Rosecrans moved accordingly, at 3 A. M, Sept. 19. in light marching order, duly advising Gen. Grant; and was within 7 1/2 miles of Iuka at noon, having been driving in the enemy's skirmishers for the last two miles. Disappointed in clearing no guns from Ord's column, lie did not choose to push his four brigades against the mo
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