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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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September 19th (search for this): chapter 10
ration was duly effected; Sept. 18. and Gen. Grant, who had now reached Burnsville, was advised that Rosecrans would attack Iuka, 19 1/2 miles from Jacinto, between 2 1/2 and 4 1/2 P. M. next day. Rosecrans moved accordingly, at 3 A. M, Sept. 19. in light marching order, duly advising Gen. Grant; and was within 7 1/2 miles of Iuka at noon, having been driving in the enemy's skirmishers for the last two miles. Disappointed in clearing no guns from Ord's column, lie did not choose to pushcrans's guns; and these a high wind from the north-west prevented his hearing at all. Ord had been watching a Rebel demonstration from the south and west upon Corinth — which proved a mere feint — but had returned to Burnsville at 4 P. M., Sept. 19. when he was directed by Grant to move his entire force — which had been swelled by the arrival of Ross's division — to within four miles of Iuka, and there await the sound of Rosecrans's guns. Ross, in his advance, reported to him a dense smo
September 20th (search for this): chapter 10
wounded. Price retreated to Ripley, Miss., where lie united with a still stronger Rebel force, under Van Dorn, who had been menacing Corinth during the conflict at Iuka, but had retreated after its close, and who now assumed command, and, marching northward, struck the Memphis Railroad at Pocahontas, considerably westward of Corinth, thence pushing Oct. 2. rapidly down the road to Chewalla, with intent to surprise, or at least storm, Corinth next day. Rosecrans — who had received Sept. 20. his promotion to a Major-Generalship directly after the affair at Iuka — had been left in chief command at Corinth by Grant, who had returned to his own headquarters at Jackson, withdrawing Ord's division to Bolivar. Rosecrans had in and about Corinth not far from 20,000 men — too few to man the extensive works constructed around it by Beauregard, when lie held that position against Halleck's besieging army. Realizing this, Rosecrans had hastily constructed an inner line of fortification<
September 15th (search for this): chapter 10
sted march northward, through Bardstown, to Frankfort, Oct. 1. the State capital, where Smith had preceded him, and where Richard Hawes, Formerly a member of Congress. a weak old man, was inaugurated Oct. 4. Provisional Governor of Kentucky. This ceremony, says Pollard, was scarcely more than a pretentious farce: hardly was it completed when the Yankees threatened Frankfort; and the newly installed Governor had to flee from their approach. Gen. Buell, after leaving Nashville Sept. 15. strongly garrisoned, had marched directly for Louisville, 170 miles; where his army arrived between the 25th and 29th. It had by this time been swelled by reenforcements, mainly raw, to nearly 100,000 men; but it was not, in his judgment, yet in condition to fight Bragg's far inferior numbers. Hence, time was taken to reorganize and supply it; while the Rebel cavalry galloped at will over the plenteous central districts of the State, collecting large quantities of cattle and hogs not onl
September 16th (search for this): chapter 10
six companies of the 50th Indiana, Col. C. L. Dunham, who, being his senior, after hesitating, assumed command; but was superseded soon afterward by an order from Boyle, and Wilder restored. The Rebels, after their first repulse, kept mainly out of sight, knowing that their ultimate success was inevitable, and allowed two more regiments and six guns to make their way into the town; assured that all who were there would soon fall into their hands. At length, at 9 1/2 A. M. on Tuesday, Sept. 16. Bragg, having brought up his main body and surrounded the place with not less than 25,000 men, renewed the attack. Advancing cautiously, keeping his men well covered, but crowding up on the weak and exposed points of our defenses in such numbers as absolutely to compel the gradual contraction of our lines, he, about sunset, sent in a flag of truce, demanding a surrender. As Buell was not at hand, nor likely to be, and as there was no hope of relief from any quarter, and no adequate reaso
July 5th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 10
to be decidedly notorious. Horse-stealing — in fact, stealing in general — in the name and behalf of Liberty and Patriotism, is apt to increase in popularity so long as it is practiced with impunity; and the horses of Kentucky are eminently calculated to inflame the love of country glowing in the breast of every cavalier. Burning bridges, and clutching whatever property could be made useful in war, had been for some time current; when at length a bolder blow was struck in the capture July 5, 1862. of Lebanon, Ky. [not Tenn.], and almost simultaneously of Murfreesboroa, Tenn., which Forrest surprised; making prisoners of Brig.-Gens. Duffield and Crittenden, of Ind., with the 9th Michigan, 3d Minnesota, 4 companies of the 4th Ky. cavalry, and 3 companies of the 7th Pa. cavalry, after a spirited but brief resistance. Henderson, Ky., on the Ohio, was likewise seized by a guerrilla band, who clutched a large amount of hospital stores; and, being piloted across by some Indiana traitors
September 17th (search for this): chapter 10
ot less than 25,000 men, renewed the attack. Advancing cautiously, keeping his men well covered, but crowding up on the weak and exposed points of our defenses in such numbers as absolutely to compel the gradual contraction of our lines, he, about sunset, sent in a flag of truce, demanding a surrender. As Buell was not at hand, nor likely to be, and as there was no hope of relief from any quarter, and no adequate reason for sacrificing the lives of his men, Wilder, at 2 A. M. next day, Sept. 17. after the fullest consultation with his officers, surrendered; being allowed to march out with drums beating and colors flying, take four days rations, and set forth immediately, under parole, for Louisville, He says in his report that his entire loss was 37 killed and wounded, while the enemy admit a loss of 714 on Sunday alone. Bragg, on the contrary, says, Our [Rebel] loss was about 50 killed and wounded; and claims 4,000 prisoners and as many muskets, beside guns and munitions. Bra
September 18th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 10
orth immediately, under parole, for Louisville, He says in his report that his entire loss was 37 killed and wounded, while the enemy admit a loss of 714 on Sunday alone. Bragg, on the contrary, says, Our [Rebel] loss was about 50 killed and wounded; and claims 4,000 prisoners and as many muskets, beside guns and munitions. Bragg now issued the following address to the people of Kentucky, which, read backward, will indicate the objects and motives of his invasion: Glasgow, Ky., Sept. 18, 1862. Kentuckians: I have entered your State with the Confederate Army of the West, and offer you an opportunity to free yourselves from the tyranny of a despotic ruler. We come, not as conquerors or despoilers, but to restore to you the liberties of which you have been deprived by a cruel and relentless foe. We come to guarantee to all the sanctity of their homes and altars; to punish with a rod of iron the despoilers of your peace, and to avenge the cowardly insults to your women. With
October 5th (search for this): chapter 10
s back five miles. Our soldiers, having now been marching and fighting some 48 hours, with very little rest, Gen. Rosecrans ordered all but those on the skirmish line to lie down, while five days rations should be issued to them, and that they should start in pursuit of the enemy early next morning ; but, just before sunset, Gen. McPherson arrived, with five fresh regiments from Gen. Grant, and was given the advance on the trail of the flying enemy, whom he followed 15 miles next day; Oct. 5. having a skirmish with his rear-guard that night. Meantime, another division, which Gen. Grant had pushed forward from Bolivar, at 3 A. M. of the eventful 4th, under Gen. Hurlbut, to the relief of Corinth, had struck the head of the enemy's retreating forces and skirmished with it considerably during the afternoon. Hurlbut was joined and ranked, next morning, by Ord. The Rebel advance, having crossed the Hatchie river at Davis's bridge, were encountered by Ord and driven back so precipi
September 1st (search for this): chapter 10
40 guns, Bragg traversed the rugged mountain ridges which hem in the Sequatchie Valley, passing through Dunlap, Aug. 27. Pikeville, Aug. 30. Crossville, Sept. 1. masking his movement by a feint with cavalry on McMinnville, but rapidly withdrawing this when its purpose was accomplished, and pressing hurriedly northward, toe spoil of munitions and provisions. It is quite probable that his story, though exaggerated, is nearer the truth than Manson's. Smith set forward directly Sept. 1. for Lexington, which he entered in triumph three days afterward, amid the frantic acclamations of the numerous Rebel sympathizers of that intensely pro-Slavery rppi and Alabama, when Gen. Buell, taking Aug. 20. two of his divisions, moved northward in pursuit of Bragg. Rosecrans was at Tuscumbia when advised, About Sept. 1. by telegram from Gen. Grant, that a considerable Rebel force was moving northward between them, and that its cavalry had already attacked Bolivar, and cut the li
October 6th (search for this): chapter 10
on Bardstown, where Bragg, with his main body, was supposed to be; skirmishing by the way with small parties of Rebel cavalry and artillery. Thus advancing steadily, though not rapidly, he passed through Bardstown, and thence to Springfield, Oct. 6. 62 miles from Louisville; Bragg slowly retreating before him, harassing rather than resisting his advance, so as to gain time for the escape of his now immense trains, consisting mainly of captured Federal army wagons, heavily laden with the sposs open fields and up hills against them. Gen. Veatch was among our wounded. Van Dorn crossed the Hatchie that night at Crumm's Mill, 12 miles farther south, burning the bridge behind him. McPherson rebuilt the bridge and crossed next day; Oct. 6. continuing the pursuit to Ripley, followed by Rosecrans with most of his army, gathering up deserters and stragglers by the way. Rosecrans was anxiously eager to continue the pursuit, and telegraphed to Grant for permission to do so, He gives
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