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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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April 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
o a successful issue without seriously disturbing the foundations and buttresses of Slavery. Mr. Lincoln's solicitude on this head, as evinced in his Inaugural Address, Vol I., pp. 422-6. was deepened by the dubious, vacillating attitude of the Border Slave States, especially of his native Kentucky, which lie was particularly anxious to attach firmly to the cause of the Union, while she seemed frantically wedded to Slavery. Gov. Seward, in his elaborate initial dispatch Dated April 22, 1861. to Mr. Dayton, our new Minister to the Court of France, approaching the topic of Slavery with unfeigned reluctance, in a paper designed to modify the ideas and influence the action of a foreign Government — indeed, of, all foreign governments — argued that the Rebellion had no pretext that did not grow out of Slavery, and that it was causeless, objectless, irrational, even in view of Slavery, because of the incontestable fact set forth by him, as follows: Moral and physical causes h
May 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
g all that has been said by the traitors to induce you to believe that our advent among you will be signalized by interference with your slaves, understand one thing clearly — not only will we abstain from all such interference, but we will, on the contrary, with an iron hand, crush any attempt at insurrection on their part. Those volunteer officers, however, who had not been blessed with a West Point training, did not always view the matter in precisely this light. Directly after May 22, 1861. Gen. Butler's accession to command at Fortress Monroe, three negro slaves came within his lines from the Rebel lines adjacent; stating that they were held as property by Col. Mallory, of the Confederate forces in his front, who was about to send them to the North Carolina seaboard, to work on the Rebel fortifications there in progress, intended to bar that coast against our arms. Gen. Butler heard their story, was satisfied of its truth, and said: These men are contraband of war: In
May 27th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
vited to a conference by Maj. Carey, commanding opposite; and accordingly met the Major (in whom he recognized an old political compatriot) a mile from the fort. Maj. Carey, as agent of his absent friend Mallory, demanded a return of those negroes; which Gen. Butler courteously but firmly declined; and, after due debate, the conference terminated fruitlessly. Very naturally, the transit of negroes from Slavery to Fortress Monroe was thenceforth almost continuous. Gen. Butler wrote May 27, 1861. forthwith to Lt.-Gen. Scott, soliciting advice and direction. In this letter, he said: Since I wrote my last, the question in regard to slave property is becoming one of very serious magnitude. The inhabitants of Virginia are using their negroes in the batteries, and are preparing to send their women and children south. The escapes from them are very numerous; and a squad has come in this morning, These fugitive slaves, at this rate, will soon prove more powerful in suffoca
May 31st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
in progress, intended to bar that coast against our arms. Gen. Butler heard their story, was satisfied of its truth, and said: These men are contraband of war: In this matter, he [Gen. Butler] has struck this Southern Insurrection in a place which is as vulnerable as the heel of Achilles; and we dare say that, in receiving and seizing the slaves of Rebels as contraband of war, this Southern Confederacy will be substantially suppressed with the pacification of Virginia.--N. Y. Herald, May 31, 1861. set them at work. He was, very soon afterward, invited to a conference by Maj. Carey, commanding opposite; and accordingly met the Major (in whom he recognized an old political compatriot) a mile from the fort. Maj. Carey, as agent of his absent friend Mallory, demanded a return of those negroes; which Gen. Butler courteously but firmly declined; and, after due debate, the conference terminated fruitlessly. Very naturally, the transit of negroes from Slavery to Fortress Monroe was the
June 28th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
itude. The inhabitants of Virginia are using their negroes in the batteries, and are preparing to send their women and children south. The escapes from them are very numerous; and a squad has come in this morning, These fugitive slaves, at this rate, will soon prove more powerful in suffocating this Southern White insurrection than all the armies of Gen. Scott. This man Butler, in this thing, has proved himself the greatest lawyer we have between a prior of epaulets.--N. Y. Herald, June 28, 1861. and my pickets are bringing in their women and children. Of course, these can not be dealt with upon the theory on which I designed to treat the services of able-bodied men and women who might come within my lines, and of which I gave you a detailed account in my last dispatch. I am in the utmost doubt what to do with this species of property. Up to this time, I have had come within my lines men and women, with their children — entire families — each family belonging to the same ow
August 4th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
9th day of May, in the year of our Lord 1862, and of the independence of the United States the eighty-sixth. (Signed) Abraham Lincoln. By the President: W. H. Seward, Secretary of State. Contrary to a very general impression, Gen. McClellan was among the first not only to perceive, but to assert, that the Rebellion was essentially a slaveholders' enterprise, and that it might be effectively assailed through Slavery. Thus, in his Memorandum privately addressed to the President, Aug. 4th, 1861, when lie had but just taken command of the Army of the Potomac, he says: In this contest, it has become necessary to crush a population sufficiently numerous, intelligent, and warlike, to constitute a nation. We have not only to defeat their armed and organized forces in the field, but to display such an overwhelming strength as will convince all our antagonists, especially those of the governing aristocratic class, of the utter impossibility of resistance. Our late reverses make
August 6th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
proclamation be so modified, held, and construed, as to conform with, and not to transcend, the provisions on the same subject contained in the Act of Congress entitled An act to confiscate property used for insurrectionary purposes, approved August 6, 1861; and that the said act be published at length with this order. Your obedient servant, A. Lincoln. In view of the sailing from Fortress Monroe of the Port Royal expedition against the Sea Islands and coast of South Carolina, General Instersons, afterward coming into the city of Washington, are liable to be arrested by the city police, upon the presumption, arising from color, that they are fugitives from service or labor. By the 4th section of the Act of Congress approved August 6, 1861, entitled An act to confiscate proeprty used for insurrectionary purposes, such hostile employment is made a full and sufficient answer to any further claim to service or labor. Persons thus employed and escaping are received into the milita
September 11th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
, is declared to be confiscated to the public uso; and their slaves, if any they have, are hereby declared free men. This position was in advance of any that had yet been sanctioned at Washington; and, though it was very generally sustained or acquiesced in by that journals supporting the War, President Lincoln wrote Gen. Fremont that he must withdraw or modify it. This, Gen. F. declined to do, unless openly directed by his superior; hence the following order: Washington, D. C., Sept. 11, 1861. Maj.-Gen. John C. Fremont:: Sir:--Yours of the 8th, in answer to nine of the 2d inst., is just received. Assured that you, upon the ground, could better judge of the necessities of your position than I could at this distance, on seeing your proclamation of August 30, I perceived no general objection to it; the particular clause, however, in relation to the confiscation of property and the liberation of slaves, appeared to me to be objectionable in its non-conformity to the Act of Co
October 14th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
ld, and construed, as to conform with, and not to transcend, the provisions on the same subject contained in the Act of Congress entitled An act to confiscate property used for insurrectionary purposes, approved August 6, 1861; and that the said act be published at length with this order. Your obedient servant, A. Lincoln. In view of the sailing from Fortress Monroe of the Port Royal expedition against the Sea Islands and coast of South Carolina, General Instructions were issued Oct. 14, 1861. to its military chief, whereof the gist is as follows: You will, in general, avail yourself of the services of any persons, whether fugitives from labor or not, who may offer them to the National Government; you will employ such persons in such service as they may be fitted for, either as ordinary employes, or, if special circumstances seem to require it, in any other capacity, with such organization, in squads, companies, or otherwise, as you deem most beneficial to the service
November 1st, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 11
Butler in command at Fortress Monroe, issued oct. 14, 1861. an order directing that all colored persons called contrabands employed by officers or others within his command, must be furnished with subsistence by their employers, and paid, if males, not less than $8 ; if females, not less than $4 per monthly; and that all ablebodied colored persons, not employed as aforesaid, will be immediately put to work in the Engineer's or the Quartermaster's Department. By a subsequent order, Nov. 1, 1861. he directed that the compensation of contrabands working for the Government should be $5 to $10 per month, with soldiers' rations. Maj.-Gen. Dix, being about to take possession of the counties of Accomac and Northampton, Va., on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay, issued Nov. 13, 1861. a Proclamation, which says: The military forces of the United States are about to enter your counties as a part of the Union. They will go among you as friends, and with the earnest hope that
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