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April 25th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
t Hilton Head, issued the following: headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General Order, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, comprising the Military Department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the 25th day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The persons in these States--Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. This order was rescinded or annulled by President Lincoln, in a Proclamation May 19. which recites it and proceeds: And, whereas, the same is producing some excitement and misunderstanding, therefore I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, proclaim and de
May 9th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
excluded from our lines. Should any such person be found within our lines, he will be arrested and sent to headquarters. Any officer or soldier of this command, who shall arrest and deliver to his master a fugitive slave, shall be summarily and severely punished, according to the laws relative to such crimes. Maj.-Gen. David Hunter, having succeeded June 18, 1862. to command at Hilton Head, issued the following: headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General Order, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, comprising the Military Department of the South, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the 25th day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The persons in these
June 18th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
is order, as a violation of law for the purpose of returning fugitives to Rebels, was arrested and deprived of his command. Lt.-Col. D. R. Anthony, 7th Kansas, was likewise arrested and deprived of his command in Tennessee, for issuing June 18, 1862. an order, which said: The impudence and impertinence of the open and earned Rebels, traitors, Secessionists, and Southern-rights men of this section of the State of Tennessee, in arrogantly demanding the right to search our camp for fugi. Any officer or soldier of this command, who shall arrest and deliver to his master a fugitive slave, shall be summarily and severely punished, according to the laws relative to such crimes. Maj.-Gen. David Hunter, having succeeded June 18, 1862. to command at Hilton Head, issued the following: headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General Order, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, comprising the Military Departm
July 4th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
he perversion of the War for the Union into a War for the Negro. Ignoring the soldiers battling for the Union--of whom at least three-fourths voted Republican at least three-fourths voted Republican at each election wherein they were allowed to vote at all; but who had not yet been enabled to vote in the field, while their absence created a chasm in the Administration vote at home — it is quite probable that, had a popular election been held at any time during the year following the Fourth of July, 1862, on the question of continuing the War or arresting it on the best attainable terms, a majority would have voted for Peace; while it is highly probable that a still larger majority would have voted against Emancipation. From an early hour of the struggle, the public mind slowly and steadily gravitated toward the conclusion that the Rebellion was vulnerable only or mainly through Slavery ; but that conclusion was scarcely reached by a majority before the occurrence of the New York Rio
July 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
military policy, his habitual doubling or trebling of the Rebel force confronting him, and of the signal incoherence and inconsequence, especially with regard to Slavery and negroes, of the lecture which, directly after his retreat from the Chickahominy to the James had been consummated, lie found time to indite-or at least to transcribe and dispatch — to his perplexed and sorely tried superior. It is as follows: headquarters army of the Potomac, camp near Harrison's Landing, Va., July 7, 1862. Mr. President: You have been fully informed that the Rebel army is in the front, with the purpose of overwhelming us by attacking our position or reducing us by blocking our river communications. I can not but regard our condition as critical; and I earnestly desire, in view of possible contingencies, to lay before your excellency, for your private consideration, my general views concerning the existing state of the Rebellion, although they do not strictly relate to the situation of
July 16th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
om any persons to whom such service or labor is claimed to be due; and any officer who shall be found guilty by a court-martial of violating this article shall be dismissed from the service. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That this act shall take effect from and after its passage. Also, to the ninth and tenth sections of an act entitled An Act to Suppress Insurrection, to Punish Treason and Rebellion, to Seize and Confiscate Property of Rebels, and for other Purposes, approved July 16, 1862; and which sections are in the words and figures following: Sec. 9. And be it further enacted, That all slaves of persons who shall hereafter be engaged in rebellion against the Government of the United States, or who shall in any way give aid or comfort thereto, escaping from such persons and taking refuge within the lines of the army; and all slaves captured from such persons, or deserted by them and coming under the control of the Government of the United States; and all slaves of
August 19th, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
olitical rights can receive protection only when it has been determined where the right lies. The manumission, which Gen. M. fore-shadowed in Missouri, West Virginia, and Maryland, was not merely a question of time. It was a question of power as well; since he plainly contemplated its achievement, not by popular action, but by military force. Paying the owner might, indeed, modify his wrath; but could not affect the fundamental question of authority and right. A letter addressed Aug. 19 1862. to the President some weeks after this, entitled The prayer of twenty Millions, and exhorting Mr. Lincoln--not to proclaim all the slaves in our country free, but to execute the laws of the land which operated to free large classes of the slaves of Rebels--concludes as follows: On the face of this wide earth, Mr. President, there is not one disinterested, determined, intelligent champion of the Union cause who does not feel that all attempts to put down the Rebellion, and at the
August 22nd, 1862 AD (search for this): chapter 11
ly to the existence of our country, but to the well-being of mankind, I entreat you to render a hearty and unequivocal obedience to the law of the land. Yours, Horace Greeley. The President — very unexpectedly — replied to this appeal by telegraph: in order, doubtless, to place before the public matter deemed by him important, and which had probably been prepared for issue before the receipt of the letter to which lie thus obliquely responded: Executive Mansion, Washington, Aug. 22, 1862. Hon. Horace Greeley: dear Sir: I have just read yours of the 19th instant, addressed to myself through The New York Tribune. If there be in it any statements or assumptions of fact which I may know to be erroneous, I do not now and here controvert them. If there be any inferences which I may believe to be falsely drawn, I do not now and here argue against them. If there be perceptible in it an impatient and dictatorial tone, I waive it in deference to an old friend whose hea
of the governments existing there, will be continued. That, on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State, or designated part of a State, the people whef the United States, containing, among other things, the following to wit: That on the 1st day of January, in the year of our Lord 1863. all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a , State, the people whereof shad then hend necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on tills first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed fir the full period of oneseal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this [L. S.] 1st day of January. in the year of our Lord 1863, and of the independence of the United States the 87th. By the President: Abraham Lincoln. William H. Sewa
July, 1863 AD (search for this): chapter 11
on the question of continuing the War or arresting it on the best attainable terms, a majority would have voted for Peace; while it is highly probable that a still larger majority would have voted against Emancipation. From an early hour of the struggle, the public mind slowly and steadily gravitated toward the conclusion that the Rebellion was vulnerable only or mainly through Slavery ; but that conclusion was scarcely reached by a majority before the occurrence of the New York Riots, in July, 1863. The President, though widely reproached with tardiness and reluctance in taking up the gage plainly thrown down by the Slave Power, was probably ahead of a majority of the people of the loyal States in definitively accepting the issue of Emancipation or Disunion. Having taken a long step in the right direction, lie never retracted nor seemed to regret it; though lie sometimes observed that the beneficial results of the Emancipation policy were neither so signal nor so promptly realize
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