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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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John Quincy Adams (search for this): chapter 11
War — Emancipation. Patrick Henry on Federal power over Slavery Edmund Randolph John Quincy Adams Joshua R. Giddings Mr. Lincoln Gov. Seward Gen. Butler Gen. Frement Gen. T. W. Shermountrymen. If it were totally abolished, it would do much good. In 1836, May 25. Mr. John Quincy Adams, having been required to vote Yea or Nay, in the House, on a proposition reported by Mr.would be equivalent to saying that Congress has no constitutional authority to make peace. Mr. Adams proceeded to show that Texas was then [prior to her annexation] the arena of a war concerning pective annexation of Texas, and a consequent war with Mexico, first loomed above the horizon, Mr. Adams returned to the subject; and, with reference to certain anti-Slavery resolves recently offeredTo brigade and regimental commanders of this division: Messrs. Nally, Gray, Dunnington, Dent, Adams, Speake, Price, Posey, and Cobey, citizens of Maryland, have negroes supposed to be with some of
rn statesmen habitually repudiated, or under the still more sweeping War power. In the course of his argument, he said: Sir, in the authority given to Congress by the Constitution of the United States to declare war, all the powers incidental to war are, by necessary implication, conferred upon the Government of the United States. Now, the powers incidental to war are derived, not from their internal municipal source, but from the laws and usages of nations. * * * There are, then, Mr. Chairman, in the authority of Congress and of the Executive, two classes of powers. altogether different in their nature, and often incompatible with each other — the War power and the Peace power. The Peace power is limited by regulations, and restricted by provisions, prescribed within the Constitution itself. The War power is limited only by the laws and usages of nations. This power is tremendous; it is strictly constitutional; but it breaks down every barrier so anxiously erected for the
George B. McClellan (search for this): chapter 11
meron his report revised by President Lincoln Seward to McClellan Gen. Burnside Gen. Buell Gen. Hooker Gen. Sickles GeCol. Anthony Gen. Hanter overruled by the President Gen. McClellan on the negro Horace Greeley to Lincoln the response slaves as if the latter had no modem existence; while Gen. McClellan, on making a like advance into Western Virginia, issueepartment of State, Washington, Dec. 4, 1861. To Maj.-Gen. Geo. B. Mcclellan: General: I am directed by the President to c of State. Contrary to a very general impression, Gen. McClellan was among the first not only to perceive, but to asserrtinent suggestions, it is impossible not to feel that Gen. McClellan's naturally fair though not brilliant mind was subjectry. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, George B. McClellan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. His Excellency A. Lincoln, Pement of the War and of the Finances, the treatment of Gen. McClellan, and the general inefficiency and incapacity of the Ad
of Brig.-Gen. Sickles's Excelsior Brigade, having just fired two pistol-shots, with evident intent to kill, at a negro running off; and thus created no little excitement among the soldiers; who, though generally enlisted with strong anti-negro prejudices, quite commonly experienced a gradual change, under the discipline of service at the front, where they found every Black their ready, active, zealous friend, and nearly every slave-holder or overseer their quiet but deadly, implacable foe. Maj. Tolen, commanding the 2d regiment, finding the order to direct the admission of but nine persons, ordered the residue to remain without the lines; and — the repugnance of the soldiers to slave-hunting threatening to break out into open violence--Gen. Sickles, who arrived soon afterward, ordered the nine out of camp likewise; so that the fugitives, if such were there, were not there captured. In the West, especially within the commands of Gens. Halleck and Buell, slave-hunters fared much bett
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 11
uincy Adams Joshua R. Giddings Mr. Lincoln Gov. Seward Gen. Butler Gen. Frement Gen. T. W. Sherman Gen. Wool Gen. Dix Gen. Halleck Gen. Cameron his report revised by President Lincoln Seward to McClellan Gen. Burnside Gen. Buell Gen. Hooker Gen. Sickles Gen. McCook Gen. Doubleday Gen. Williams Col. Anthony Gen. Hanter overruled by the President Gen. McClellan on the negro Horace Greeley to Lincoln the response do, to the Chicago Clergymen Lincoln's first Proclamation or its policy to violate law or the rights of individuals in any particular. With great respect, your obedient servant, D. C. Buell, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Department. Hon. J. R. Underwood, Chairman Military Committee, Frankfort, Ky. Gen. Joseph Hooker, commanding on the Upper Potomac, issued March 26, 1862. the following order: To brigade and regimental commanders of this division: Messrs. Nally, Gray, Dunnington, Dent, Adams, Speake, Price, Posey, and Cobey, citizens of Ma
David Hunter (search for this): chapter 11
who shall arrest and deliver to his master a fugitive slave, shall be summarily and severely punished, according to the laws relative to such crimes. Maj.-Gen. David Hunter, having succeeded June 18, 1862. to command at Hilton Head, issued the following: headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9Lincoln, President of the United States, proclaim and declare that the Government of the United States had no knowledge or belief of an intention on the part of Gen. Hunter to issue such proclamation, nor has it yet any authentio information that the document is genuine: and, further, that neither Gen. Hunter nor any other commandeGen. Hunter nor any other commander or person has been authorized by the Government of the United States to make proclamation declaring the slaves of any State free; and that the supposed proclamation now in question, whether genuine or false, is altogether void, so far as respects such declaration. I further make known that, whether it be competent for me, as Com
Zachariah Johnson (search for this): chapter 11
y: denying most strenuously that there is any power of abolition given to Congress by the Constitution; but not alluding to what Henry had urged with regard to the War power and the right of Congress to summon every slave to the military defense of the country. Nor does this view of the subject appear to have attracted much attention elsewhere — at least, it does not appear to have been anywhere controverted. In closing the argument in favor of ratifying the Federal Constitution, Mr. Zachariah Johnson said: They tell us that they see a progressive danger of bringing about emancipation. The principle has begun since the Revolution. Let us do what we will, it will come around. Slavery has been the foundation of that impiety and dissipation, which have been so much disseminated among our countrymen. If it were totally abolished, it would do much good. In 1836, May 25. Mr. John Quincy Adams, having been required to vote Yea or Nay, in the House, on a proposition reporte
Benjamin F. Butler (search for this): chapter 11
shua R. Giddings Mr. Lincoln Gov. Seward Gen. Butler Gen. Frement Gen. T. W. Sherman Gen. Woohis light. Directly after May 22, 1861. Gen. Butler's accession to command at Fortress Monroe, e contraband of war: In this matter, he [Gen. Butler] has struck this Southern Insurrection in a, demanded a return of those negroes; which Gen. Butler courteously but firmly declined; and, afteronroe was thenceforth almost continuous. Gen. Butler wrote May 27, 1861. forthwith to Lt.-Gencretary of War. Your obedient servant, Benj. F. Butler. Lt.-General Scott. He was answered bion. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. To Maj.-Gen. Butler. Time passed. Bull Run had been fouge public. Maj.-Gen. Wool, who succeeded Gen. Butler in command at Fortress Monroe, issued ocan we feed arid care for such a multitude? Gen. Butler wrote me a few days since that he was issuihey eat, and that is all; though it is true Gen. Butler is feeding the Whites also by the thousand;[2 more...]
ued by a Brigadier in the Department of the Gulf: In consequence of the demoralizing and disorganizing tendencies to the troops of harboring runaway negroes, it is hereby ordered that the respective commanders of the camps and garrisons of the several regiments, 2d brigade, turn all such fugitives in their camps or garrisons out beyond the limits of their respective guards and sentinels. By order of Brig.-Gen. T. Williams. Col. Halbert E. Paine, Elected to the XXXIXth Congress (House) as a Unionist, from the Milwaukee District. 4th Wisconsin, declining to obey this order, as a violation of law for the purpose of returning fugitives to Rebels, was arrested and deprived of his command. Lt.-Col. D. R. Anthony, 7th Kansas, was likewise arrested and deprived of his command in Tennessee, for issuing June 18, 1862. an order, which said: The impudence and impertinence of the open and earned Rebels, traitors, Secessionists, and Southern-rights men of this section of th
XI. Slavery in the War — Emancipation. Patrick Henry on Federal power over Slavery Edmund Randolph John Quincy Adams Joshua R. Giddings Mr. Lincoln Gov. Seward Gen. Butler Gen. Frement Gen. T. W. Sherman Gen. Wool Gen. Dix Gen. Halleck Gen. Cameron his report revised by President Lincoln Seward to McClellan Gen. Burnside Gen. Buell Gen. Hooker Gen. Sickles Gen. McCook Gen. Doubleday Gen. Williams Col. Anthony Gen. Hanter overruled by the President Gen. McClellan on the negro Horace Greeley to Lincoln the response do, to the Chicago Clergymen Lincoln's first Proclamation of Freedom the Elections of 1862 second Proclamation of Freedom Edward Everett on its Validity. the Federal Constitution was framed in General Convention, and carried in the several State Conventions, by the aid of adroit and politic evasions and reserves on the part of its framers and champions. The existing necessity for a stronger central authority, which had been deve
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