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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

Found 916 total hits in 196 results.

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Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
268,030 208,412 215,616 219,140 Ohio 231,610 210,831 178,755 184,332 Indiana 13<*>,033 133,110 118,517 128,160 Illinois 172,161 169,215 120,116 136,662 Michigan 88,480 66,267 68,716 62,102 Wisconsin 86,11<*> 66,070 66,801 67,985 Iowa 70,409 57,922 Soldiers' vote: Admn., 14,874; Opp., 4,115. Wisconsin Soldiers' Vote: Admn., 8,373; Opp., 2,046. No other States had yet authorized their soldiers in the field to vote.66,014 50,898 Minnesota 22,069 12,668 15,754 11,442   lly classified as follows:   1860. 1862.   Repub. Dem. Admin. Opp. New York 23 10 14 17 New Jersey 2 3 1 4 Pennsylvania 18 7 12 12 Ohio 13 8 5 14 Indiana 7 4 4 7 Illinois 4 5 5 9 Michigan 4 0 5 1 Wisconsin 3 0 3 3 Iowa 2 0 6 0 Minnesota 2 0 2 0   Total, 10 States 78 37 57 67 1860--Lincoln maj.--41. 1862--Opposition maj., 10. note.--A new apportionment under the Census of 1860 changed materially, between 1860 and 1862, the number of Represen
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
he foundations and buttresses of Slavery. Mr. Lincoln's solicitude on this head, as evinced in his Inaugural Address, Vol I., pp. 422-6. was deepened by the dubious, vacillating attitude of the Border Slave States, especially of his native Kentucky, which lie was particularly anxious to attach firmly to the cause of the Union, while she seemed frantically wedded to Slavery. Gov. Seward, in his elaborate initial dispatch Dated April 22, 1861. to Mr. Dayton, our new Minister to the Cou, 10. note.--A new apportionment under the Census of 1860 changed materially, between 1860 and 1862, the number of Representatives from several of the States. There were some counterbalancing changes in the States of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, as also in that of California, where the larger share of the Douglas vote of 1860 was in 1862 cast for the Union tickets; but it was clear, at the close of the State Elections of that year, that the general ill success of the War
St. Charles, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed fir the full period of one hundred days from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof respectively are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following: to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemine, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida. Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisel
Northampton, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ers, and paid, if males, not less than $8 ; if females, not less than $4 per monthly; and that all ablebodied colored persons, not employed as aforesaid, will be immediately put to work in the Engineer's or the Quartermaster's Department. By a subsequent order, Nov. 1, 1861. he directed that the compensation of contrabands working for the Government should be $5 to $10 per month, with soldiers' rations. Maj.-Gen. Dix, being about to take possession of the counties of Accomac and Northampton, Va., on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay, issued Nov. 13, 1861. a Proclamation, which says: The military forces of the United States are about to enter your counties as a part of the Union. They will go among you as friends, and with the earnest hope that they may not, by your own acts, be forced to become your enemies. They will invade no rights of person or property. On the contrary, your laws, your institutions, your usages, will be scrupulously respected. There need be no
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
siana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemine, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida. Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. And, by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all person held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. And
Orleans, Ma. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
rdance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed fir the full period of one hundred days from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof respectively are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following: to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemine, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida. Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Anne, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth), and which excepted parts are, for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. And, by virtue of the power and for the purpose a
California (California, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Indiana 7 4 4 7 Illinois 4 5 5 9 Michigan 4 0 5 1 Wisconsin 3 0 3 3 Iowa 2 0 6 0 Minnesota 2 0 2 0   Total, 10 States 78 37 57 67 1860--Lincoln maj.--41. 1862--Opposition maj., 10. note.--A new apportionment under the Census of 1860 changed materially, between 1860 and 1862, the number of Representatives from several of the States. There were some counterbalancing changes in the States of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, as also in that of California, where the larger share of the Douglas vote of 1860 was in 1862 cast for the Union tickets; but it was clear, at the close of the State Elections of that year, that the general ill success of the War for the Union, the wide-spread and increasing repugnance to Conscription, Taxation, a depreciated Currency, and high-priced Fabrics, were arraying Public Sentiment against the further prosecution of the contest. Of course, the Opposition inveighed against the management of the War and of the
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ection of the United States; and their arrest as fugitives from service or labor should be immediately followed by the military arrest of the parties making the seizure. Copies of this communication will be sent to the Major of the City of Washington and to the Marshal of the District of Columbia, that any collision between the civil and military authorities may be avoided. I am, General, your very obedient, William H. Seward. Maj.-Gen. Burnside, having established himself on Roanoke Island, issued, Feb. 18, 1862. conjointly with Com. Golds-borough, a Proclamation, in which he said: The Government asks only that its authority may be recognized; and we repeat, in no manner or way does it desire to interfere with your laws, constitutionally established, your institutions of any kind whatever, your property of any sort, or your usages in any respect. Maj.-Gen. Buell, soon after establishing himself at Nashville, Tenn., thus demonstrated his undoubted devotion to the
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
South. Gov. Edmund Randolph--who became Washington's Attorney-General--answered Mr. Henry: denyvance of any that had yet been sanctioned at Washington; and, though it was very generally sustainedperior; hence the following order: Washington, D. C., Sept. 11, 1861. Maj.-Gen. John C. Fremod the following: Department of State, Washington, Dec. 4, 1861. To Maj.-Gen. Geo. B. Mcclellah persons, afterward coming into the city of Washington, are liable to be arrested by the city polic be hereunto affixed. Done at the city of Washington this 19th day of May, in the year of our Lorected, during his long sojourn thereafter in Washington, to sinister political influences and the whbliquely responded: Executive Mansion, Washington, Aug. 22, 1862. Hon. Horace Greeley: deard near Bull Run, an expedition went out from Washington, under a flag of truce. to bury the dead aiStates to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington, this [L. S.] 1st day of January. in the y
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ntitled under the Constitution of the country. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. The abuse of negroes who had escaped from Rebel masters in Virginia and taken shelter within the lines of the Army of the Potomac, elicited the following: Department of State, Washington, Dec. 4, 1861. To Maj.-Gen. Geo. B. Mcclellan: General: I am directed by the President to call your attention to the following subject: Persons claimed to be held to service or labor under the laws of the State of Virginia, and actually employed in hosthe service against the Government of the United States, frequently escape from the lines of the enemy's forces, and are received within the lines of the Army of the Potomac. This Department understands that such persons, afterward coming into the city of Washington, are liable to be arrested by the city police, upon the presumption, arising from color, that they are fugitives from service or labor. By the 4th section of the Act of Congress approved A
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