hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William T. Sherman 512 6 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 452 0 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 431 1 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 404 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 400 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 332 2 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 331 7 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 326 8 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 325 1 Browse Search
Ambrose E. Burnside 297 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

Found 916 total hits in 196 results.

... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...
T. F. Wilson (search for this): chapter 11
them earnestly besought me to proclaim general Emancipation; upon which the other two at once attacked then. You know also that the last session of Congress had a decided majority of anti-Slavery men, yet they could not unite on this policy. And the same is true of the religious people. Why, the Rebel soldiers are praying with a great deal more earnestness, I fear, than our own troops. and expecting God to flavor their side: for one of our soldiers, who had been taken prisoner, told Senator Wilson a few days since that he met nothing so discouraging as the evident sincerity of those he was along in their payers. But we will talk over the merits of the case. What good would a proclamation of Emancipation from me do, especially as we are now situated? I do not want to issue a document that the whole world will see must necessarily be inoperative, like tho Pope's bull against the comet. Would my word free the slaves, when I can not even enforce the Constitution in the Rebel St
Edward Everett (search for this): chapter 11
hony Gen. Hanter overruled by the President Gen. McClellan on the negro Horace Greeley to Lincoln the response do, to the Chicago Clergymen Lincoln's first Proclamation of Freedom the Elections of 1862 second Proclamation of Freedom Edward Everett on its Validity. the Federal Constitution was framed in General Convention, and carried in the several State Conventions, by the aid of adroit and politic evasions and reserves on the part of its framers and champions. The existing necessur Lord 1863, and of the independence of the United States the 87th. By the President: Abraham Lincoln. William H. Seward, Secretary of State. On the abstract question of the right of the Government to proclaim and enforce Emancipation, Edward Everett, in a speech in Faneuil Hall, Boston, October, 1864, forcibly said: It is very doubtful whether any act of the Government of the United States was necessary to liberate tie slaves in a State which is in rebellion. There is much reason fo
Dunnington (search for this): chapter 11
f this army is lawabiding, and that it is neither its disposition nor its policy to violate law or the rights of individuals in any particular. With great respect, your obedient servant, D. C. Buell, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Department. Hon. J. R. Underwood, Chairman Military Committee, Frankfort, Ky. Gen. Joseph Hooker, commanding on the Upper Potomac, issued March 26, 1862. the following order: To brigade and regimental commanders of this division: Messrs. Nally, Gray, Dunnington, Dent, Adams, Speake, Price, Posey, and Cobey, citizens of Maryland, have negroes supposed to be with some of the regiments of this division: the Brigadier-General commanding directs that they be permitted to visit all the camps of his command, in search of their property; and, if found, that they be allowed to take possession of the same, without any interference whatever. Should any obstacle be thrown in their way by any office or soldier in the division, he will be at once reported by
ing the slaves of Rebels as contraband of war, this Southern Confederacy will be substantially suppressed with the pacification of Virginia.--N. Y. Herald, May 31, 1861. set them at work. He was, very soon afterward, invited to a conference by Maj. Carey, commanding opposite; and accordingly met the Major (in whom he recognized an old political compatriot) a mile from the fort. Maj. Carey, as agent of his absent friend Mallory, demanded a return of those negroes; which Gen. Butler courteously Maj. Carey, as agent of his absent friend Mallory, demanded a return of those negroes; which Gen. Butler courteously but firmly declined; and, after due debate, the conference terminated fruitlessly. Very naturally, the transit of negroes from Slavery to Fortress Monroe was thenceforth almost continuous. Gen. Butler wrote May 27, 1861. forthwith to Lt.-Gen. Scott, soliciting advice and direction. In this letter, he said: Since I wrote my last, the question in regard to slave property is becoming one of very serious magnitude. The inhabitants of Virginia are using their negroes in the batteries
R. G. Blake (search for this): chapter 11
y within the commands of Gens. Halleck and Buell, slave-hunters fared much better; as one of their number about this time admiringly reported to a Nashville journal, as follows: He visited the camp of Gen. McCook, in Maury county, in quest of a fugitive; and that officer, instead of throwing obstacles in the way, afforded him every facility for the successful prosecution of his search. That General treated him in the most courteous and gentlemanly manner; as also did Gen. Johnson and Capt. Blake, the brigade Provost-Marshal. Their conduct toward him was in all respects that of high-toned gentlemen, desirous of discharging their duties promptly and honorably. It is impossible for the army to prevent slaves from following them; but, whenever the fugitives come into the lines of Gen. McCook, they are secured, and a record made of their names and the names of their owners. All the owner has to do is to apply, either in person or through an agent, examine the record, or look at the
Joel Parker (search for this): chapter 11
ption that its appearance was somewhat delayed, awaiting the issue of the struggle in Maryland, which terminated with the battle of Antietam. Fought Sept. 17th--Proclamation of Freedom, dated 22d. Whether the open adhesion of the President at last to the policy of Emancipation did or did not contribute to the general defeat of his supporters in the State Elections which soon followed, is still fairly disputable. By those elections, Horatio Seymour was made Governor of New York and Joel Parker of New Jersey: supplanting Governors Morgan and Olden; while Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, also gave Opposition majorities; and Michigan, Wisconsin, and most other Western States, showed a decided falling off in Administration strength. The general result of those elections is summed up in the following table: 1860--President. 1862--Gov. Or Congress. States. Lincoln. All others. Admin. Opp. New York 362,646 312,510 295,897 306,649 New Jersey 58,324 62,801 46,710
Edward Johnson (search for this): chapter 11
e West, especially within the commands of Gens. Halleck and Buell, slave-hunters fared much better; as one of their number about this time admiringly reported to a Nashville journal, as follows: He visited the camp of Gen. McCook, in Maury county, in quest of a fugitive; and that officer, instead of throwing obstacles in the way, afforded him every facility for the successful prosecution of his search. That General treated him in the most courteous and gentlemanly manner; as also did Gen. Johnson and Capt. Blake, the brigade Provost-Marshal. Their conduct toward him was in all respects that of high-toned gentlemen, desirous of discharging their duties promptly and honorably. It is impossible for the army to prevent slaves from following them; but, whenever the fugitives come into the lines of Gen. McCook, they are secured, and a record made of their names and the names of their owners. All the owner has to do is to apply, either in person or through an agent, examine the record
J. S. Scott (search for this): chapter 11
Very naturally, the transit of negroes from Slavery to Fortress Monroe was thenceforth almost continuous. Gen. Butler wrote May 27, 1861. forthwith to Lt.-Gen. Scott, soliciting advice and direction. In this letter, he said: Since I wrote my last, the question in regard to slave property is becoming one of very seme in this morning, These fugitive slaves, at this rate, will soon prove more powerful in suffocating this Southern White insurrection than all the armies of Gen. Scott. This man Butler, in this thing, has proved himself the greatest lawyer we have between a prior of epaulets.--N. Y. Herald, June 28, 1861. and my pickets are bdoing — to duplicate the parts of my dispatch relating to this subject, and forward them to the Secretary of War. Your obedient servant, Benj. F. Butler. Lt.-General Scott. He was answered by the head of the War Department as follows: Sir:--Your action in respect to the negroes who came within your lines, from the s
Simon Cameron (search for this): chapter 11
ov. Seward Gen. Butler Gen. Frement Gen. T. W. Sherman Gen. Wool Gen. Dix Gen. Halleck Gen. Cameron his report revised by President Lincoln Seward to McClellan Gen. Burnside Gen. Buell Gentenance. The question of their final disposition will be reserved for future determination. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. To Maj.-Gen. Butler. Time passed. Bull Run had been fought and lost;oration of peaceful relations to the Union, under the Constitution, will immediately remove. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. Gen. T. W. Sherman, Not William T., who became so famous, but an older the Constitution of the country. Mr. Lincoln struck out and suppressed this portion of Gen. Cameron's Report, inserting in its stead the following: It is already a grave question what sl slaveholders every right to which they are entitled under the Constitution of the country. Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. The abuse of negroes who had escaped from Rebel masters in Virginia
Luther Martin (search for this): chapter 11
e utterly and instantly prohibited the Foreign Slave-Trade, but for the proclaimed fact that this would insure the rejection of their handiwork by the still slave-hungry States of South Carolina and Georgia, if not of North Carolina also; though Virginia was among the most earnest advocates of the prohibition. Hence, when the State Conventions were assembled to ratify or reject it, with such eminent Revolutionary patriots as Patrick Henry, John Hancock, Samuel Adams, George Clinton, and Luther Martin, leading in the opposition, the clauses affecting Slavery were vigilantly, and not unsuccessfully, scrutinized for grounds of attack — the provision concerning the African Slave-Trade being assailed in some States from the side of Slavery, in others from that of anti-Slavery, with vigor and effect. In the North, these assaults were parried by pointing to the power conferred on Congress to abolish the traffic after twenty years, as so much clear gain: to reject the Constitution would not
... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...