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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
diwork by the still slave-hungry States of South Carolina and Georgia, if not of North Carolina alsoosition reported by Mr. H. L. Pinckney, of South Carolina, in these words-- Resolved, That Congreition against the Sea Islands and coast of South Carolina, General Instructions were issued Oct. ds, issued a proclamation to the people of South Carolina, wherein he said: In obedience to the Whlites — within their knowledge. And no South Carolina journal intimated that Gen. Sherman's virtherwise have been. If any White native of South Carolina came over to us, or evinced a desire to doquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General Order, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, comprising the Military Department of the South,ons in these States--Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore ), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida. Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the [1 more...]
Chicago (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
— hesitated, and demurred, and resisted — possibly after he had silently resolved that the step must finally be taken. Mr. Lincoln was soon visited, Sept. 13. among others, by a deputation from the various Protestant denominations of Chicago, Illinois, charged with the duty of urging on him the adoption of a more decided and vigorous policy of Emancipation. He listened to the reading of their memorial, and responded in substance as follows: The subject is difficult, and good men do by night, more than any other. Whatever shall appear to be God's will, I will do. I trust that, in the freedom with which I have canvassed your views, I have not in any respect injured your feelings. The deputation had scarcely returned to Chicago and reported to their constituents, when the great body of the President's supporters were electrified, while his opponents in general were only still farther alienated, by the unheralded appearance of the following proclamation: I, Abra
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
rs in the State Elections which soon followed, is still fairly disputable. By those elections, Horatio Seymour was made Governor of New York and Joel Parker of New Jersey: supplanting Governors Morgan and Olden; while Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, also gave Opposition majorities; and Michigan, Wisconsin, and most oth in the following table: 1860--President. 1862--Gov. Or Congress. States. Lincoln. All others. Admin. Opp. New York 362,646 312,510 295,897 306,649 New Jersey 58,324 62,801 46,710 61,307 Pennsylvania 268,030 208,412 215,616 219,140 Ohio 231,610 210,831 178,755 184,332 Indiana 13<*>,033 133,110 118,517 128,160entatives in Congress chosen from these States were politically classified as follows:   1860. 1862.   Repub. Dem. Admin. Opp. New York 23 10 14 17 New Jersey 2 3 1 4 Pennsylvania 18 7 12 12 Ohio 13 8 5 14 Indiana 7 4 4 7 Illinois 4 5 5 9 Michigan 4 0 5 1 Wisconsin 3 0 3 3 Iowa 2 0 6 0 Minnesot
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
insure the rejection of their handiwork by the still slave-hungry States of South Carolina and Georgia, if not of North Carolina also; though Virginia was among the most earnest advocates of the pro afterward, on a proposition that rations be distributed from the public stores to citizens: of Georgia and Alabama who have been driven from their homes by Indian depredations, proceeded to show thant of the South, Hilton head, S. C., May 9, 1862. General Order, No. 11. The three States of Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, comprising the Military Department of the South, having deliberatry and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The persons in these States--Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina--heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. ry, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida. Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as We
Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
reference to certain anti-Slavery resolves recently offered by Mr. Giddings, of Ohio, and the action of the House thereupon, said: What I am now to say, I say wihat, so far as I could understand the resolutions proposed by the gentleman from Ohio [Mr. Giddings], there were some of them for which I was ready to vote, and some vote, as I have said, against one of the resolutions of my excellent friend from Ohio [Mr. Giddings], or should at least have required that it be amended in conformitarker of New Jersey: supplanting Governors Morgan and Olden; while Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, also gave Opposition majorities; and Michigan, Wisconsiny 58,324 62,801 46,710 61,307 Pennsylvania 268,030 208,412 215,616 219,140 Ohio 231,610 210,831 178,755 184,332 Indiana 13<*>,033 133,110 118,517 128,160 Opp. New York 23 10 14 17 New Jersey 2 3 1 4 Pennsylvania 18 7 12 12 Ohio 13 8 5 14 Indiana 7 4 4 7 Illinois 4 5 5 9 Michigan 4 0 5 1 Wisconsi
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
: Messrs. Nally, Gray, Dunnington, Dent, Adams, Speake, Price, Posey, and Cobey, citizens of Maryland, have negroes supposed to be with some of the regiments of this division: the Brigadier-Generalmission in such State ; and in Missouri, perhaps in Western Virginia also, and possibly even in Maryland, the expediency of such a measure is only a question of time. A system of policy thus constitue the right lies. The manumission, which Gen. M. fore-shadowed in Missouri, West Virginia, and Maryland, was not merely a question of time. It was a question of power as well; since he plainly conte the assumption that its appearance was somewhat delayed, awaiting the issue of the struggle in Maryland, which terminated with the battle of Antietam. Fought Sept. 17th--Proclamation of Freedom, dm several of the States. There were some counterbalancing changes in the States of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, as also in that of California, where the larger share of the Douglas v
Maury (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
nd — the repugnance of the soldiers to slave-hunting threatening to break out into open violence--Gen. Sickles, who arrived soon afterward, ordered the nine out of camp likewise; so that the fugitives, if such were there, were not there captured. In the West, especially within the commands of Gens. Halleck and Buell, slave-hunters fared much better; as one of their number about this time admiringly reported to a Nashville journal, as follows: He visited the camp of Gen. McCook, in Maury county, in quest of a fugitive; and that officer, instead of throwing obstacles in the way, afforded him every facility for the successful prosecution of his search. That General treated him in the most courteous and gentlemanly manner; as also did Gen. Johnson and Capt. Blake, the brigade Provost-Marshal. Their conduct toward him was in all respects that of high-toned gentlemen, desirous of discharging their duties promptly and honorably. It is impossible for the army to prevent slaves from
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
but for the proclaimed fact that this would insure the rejection of their handiwork by the still slave-hungry States of South Carolina and Georgia, if not of North Carolina also; though Virginia was among the most earnest advocates of the prohibition. Hence, when the State Conventions were assembled to ratify or reject it, with m the Rebel lines adjacent; stating that they were held as property by Col. Mallory, of the Confederate forces in his front, who was about to send them to the North Carolina seaboard, to work on the Rebel fortifications there in progress, intended to bar that coast against our arms. Gen. Butler heard their story, was satisfied ofmption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans), Mississippi, Alabama, Florida. Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Pri
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
on assuming civil as well as military control of the State of Missouri, issued the memorable General Order, See it in fulhe property, real and personal, of all persons in the State of Missouri who shall take up arms against the United States, or Halleck, soon after succeeding Gen. Fremont in command in Missouri, issued his famous Order no. 3, which sets forth that btaining valuable information and aid. That the Whites of Missouri were far more likely than the Blacks to be traitors at hear State, thus working manumission in such State ; and in Missouri, perhaps in Western Virginia also, and possibly even in Mht lies. The manumission, which Gen. M. fore-shadowed in Missouri, West Virginia, and Maryland, was not merely a question oncipation. The then Attorney-General Edward Bates, of Missouri. has been quoted as authority for this statement; but it hanges in the States of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri, as also in that of California, where the larger share of
Harrison's Landing (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
timid and dawdling military policy, his habitual doubling or trebling of the Rebel force confronting him, and of the signal incoherence and inconsequence, especially with regard to Slavery and negroes, of the lecture which, directly after his retreat from the Chickahominy to the James had been consummated, lie found time to indite-or at least to transcribe and dispatch — to his perplexed and sorely tried superior. It is as follows: headquarters army of the Potomac, camp near Harrison's Landing, Va., July 7, 1862. Mr. President: You have been fully informed that the Rebel army is in the front, with the purpose of overwhelming us by attacking our position or reducing us by blocking our river communications. I can not but regard our condition as critical; and I earnestly desire, in view of possible contingencies, to lay before your excellency, for your private consideration, my general views concerning the existing state of the Rebellion, although they do not strictly relate
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