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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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if not warned of the changed condition of affairs. Magruder reports his entire loss in this fight at 26 killed, 117 wounded, and the steamer Neptune--her crew and guns being saved. He says he captured (beside the Harriet Lane, with all her armament, the schooner and barques), 350 prisoners, beside officers ; while our losses include the Westfield also, with her splendid battery of eight heavy rifled guns. He came very near entrapping the steamship Cambria, which arrived off the bar on the 3d, containing (he says) E. J. Davis and many other apostate Texans, beside several hundred troops, and 2,500 saddles for the use of native sympathizers. Her captain, however, was seasonably warned to escape. One Galveston Unionist, named Thomas Smith, who was landed from her yawl, he caught, tried, and shot as a deserter from the Rebel service. And that was the sum of his spoils --Com. Farragut, soon after, sending vessels to reestablish the blockade, before the Harriet Lane could be got read
Washburne reports a loss of 26 killed, 124 wounded, and 566 missing (prisoners); total: 716. The Rebels lost 60 killed, 65 prisoners, and 300 wounded. Gen. Banks's new expedition, 6,000 strong, led by Banks himself, but more immediately commanded by Gen. Dana, made Oct. 26. directly for the Rio Grande, debarking Nov. 2. at Brazos Santiago, driving off the small cavalry force there stationed, and following it to Brownsville, 30 miles above, which was entered by our advance on the 16th; as was Point Isabel two days later. The Rebel works commanding Aransas Pass were next taken by assault, which gave us their guns and 100 prisoners. Moving thence on Pass Cavallo, commanding the western entrance to Matagorda Bay, our army invested Fort Esperanza, which was thereupon abandoned; most of its garrison escaping to the main land. Banks had expected to follow up this success — which gave us control of the coast from the Rio Grande to the Brazos — by a movement on Indianola or on
January 5th (search for this): chapter 15
els raised a white flag on the Harriet Lane, and sent a truce-boat to the Clifton, demanding the surrender There are all manner of conflicting statements concerning this truce: each party charging the other with violating it by acting while it lasted as if it had no existence. One Union writer says that the Rebels only demanded that our vessels should quit the harbor within three hours. This would render Renshaw's conduct with regard to his ship less mysterious. The Houston Telegraph of Jan. 5 had an account of the whole affair by an eye-witness, who makes the truce a Rebel trick from its inception. He says: The propeller Owasco lay in the channel, about three-fourths of a mile from the Bayou City and Harriet Lane. As the Lane was boarded, the Owasco steamed up to within 200 or 300 yards of them, firing into both. The force of the collision drove tie Bayou City's stem so far into and under the wheel and gunwale of the Lane that she could not be got out. The Lane was also
January 11th (search for this): chapter 15
and the schooner Velocity, 3 guns; which were attacked Jan. 21, 1863. by two Rebel gunboats — Josiah Bell and Uncle Ben--fitted out in the Sabine for the purpose, under command of Major O. M. Watkins, who chased our vessels out to sea and captured them after a very feeble resistance. Watkins reports his captures at 13 guns, 129 prisoners, and $1,000,000 worth of stores. The blockade of Galveston having barely been reestablished under Com. Bell, of the Brooklyn, a sail was descried Jan. 11, 3 1/2 P. M. in the south-east; when the gunboat Hatteras, Lt.-Com'g R. G. Blake, was signaled by Bell to overhaul her. The stranger affected to fly; but Blake soon observed that lie did not seem in any great hurry. Clearing his decks for action, he stood on; and, when four miles distant, he saw that the chase had ceased to steam and was waiting. Blake, whose guns were short as well as few, ran down to within 75 yards and hailed; when the stranger answered his hail by proclaiming his craf
January 14th (search for this): chapter 15
ns in the Teche region. Starting Jan. 11, 1863. from Thibodeaux, Gen. Weitzel embarked his infantry next day at Brashear, on the gunboats Calhoun, Diana, Kinsman, and Estrella, Com. McKean Buchanan, who moved slowly up the bayou to Pattersonville; the artillery and cavalry going by land. Encountering formidable obstructions at a place known as Carney's Bridge, a few miles above, Com. Buchanan, after reconnoitering, dropped down a short distance for the night; returning next morning Jan. 14. to attack; while the 8th Vermont was sent around to flank the defenses on the north. The obstructions were found vexatious rather than formidable: consisting of a steamboat filled with brick and sunk across the channel, with the great iron-clad gunboat Cotton behind it; a battery on either flank, and some torpedoes in the bayou below. One of these was exploded under the Kinsman; lifting her stern into the air, but not crippling her; when she fell back to avoid another just ahead, where
February 10th (search for this): chapter 15
here beaten consisted of the 28th Louisiana, with Simms's and the Pelican battery, under Col. Gray--in all, but 1,100 men, beside the crew of the Cotton. Our loss was 7 killed and 27 wounded. Gen. Banks being still intent on opening the Atchafalaya by the meditated advance through the Bayou Plaquemine to the capture of Butte á la Rose, the next month was wasted on this enterprise; and the success at Carney's Bridge was not otherwise improved. Meantime, some 200 Western boys defeated Feb. 10. a like number of the 3d Louisiana cavalry at Old River; losing 12 men, killing 4, wounding 7, and taking 26 prisoners. Admiral Farragut, having heard of our loss of the Queen of the West and De Soto See page 298. below Vicksburg, decided that it was his duty to run the Rebel batteries at Port Hudson, in order to recover the command of the river above; so he called on Gen. Banks for cooperation. Hereupon, our forces were hastily recalled from the Atchafalaya and concentrated at Baton
March 13th (search for this): chapter 15
at Old River; losing 12 men, killing 4, wounding 7, and taking 26 prisoners. Admiral Farragut, having heard of our loss of the Queen of the West and De Soto See page 298. below Vicksburg, decided that it was his duty to run the Rebel batteries at Port Hudson, in order to recover the command of the river above; so he called on Gen. Banks for cooperation. Hereupon, our forces were hastily recalled from the Atchafalaya and concentrated at Baton Rouge; where they crossed and advanced, March 13-14. about 12,000 strong, driving in the Rebel pickets, to the rear of the Port; Farragut having intended, under cover of a land attack on that side, to run the batteries early next morning. He judged best, however, to anticipate Gen. Banks's attack, the night being intensely dark; so, in his stout flag-ship Hartford, lashed side to side with the Albatross, he led the perilous adventure; arriving abreast of the Rebel batteries a little before midnight. If he had counted on passing unobse
March 14th (search for this): chapter 15
t Hudson, in order to recover the command of the river above; so he called on Gen. Banks for cooperation. Hereupon, our forces were hastily recalled from the Atchafalaya and concentrated at Baton Rouge; where they crossed and advanced, March 13-14. about 12,000 strong, driving in the Rebel pickets, to the rear of the Port; Farragut having intended, under cover of a land attack on that side, to run the batteries early next morning. He judged best, however, to anticipate Gen. Banks's attack, ing Brig.-Gen. W. W. R. Beall, of the garrison, as his authority: The strength of the enemy at Port Hudson was then believed to be from 18,000 to 20,000. It is now known, with absolute certainty, that the garrison. on the night of the 14th of March. 1863, was not less than 16,000 effective troops. to be besieged by his little army — a point whereon Gen. Halleck deems him in error. Our columns were again impelled westward to Brashear City and thence across Berwick's Bay; April 9-10.
ort, citing Brig.-Gen. W. W. R. Beall, of the garrison, as his authority: The strength of the enemy at Port Hudson was then believed to be from 18,000 to 20,000. It is now known, with absolute certainty, that the garrison. on the night of the 14th of March. 1863, was not less than 16,000 effective troops. to be besieged by his little army — a point whereon Gen. Halleck deems him in error. Our columns were again impelled westward to Brashear City and thence across Berwick's Bay; April 9-10. the main body moving thence on Franklin, while Gen. Grover's division was sent by transports up the Atchafalaya and Grand Lake to Irish Bend, above Fort Bisland, where lie effected a landing with great difficulty — the water being, shallow for over a mile from shore, precluding his expected cooperation in Gen. Banks's movement. Here he was soon attacked with vigor, but held his ground and beat off the enemy. Still, the attack sufficed to keep open the road for Gen. Dick Taylor, who, e
April 10th (search for this): chapter 15
citing Brig.-Gen. W. W. R. Beall, of the garrison, as his authority: The strength of the enemy at Port Hudson was then believed to be from 18,000 to 20,000. It is now known, with absolute certainty, that the garrison. on the night of the 14th of March. 1863, was not less than 16,000 effective troops. to be besieged by his little army — a point whereon Gen. Halleck deems him in error. Our columns were again impelled westward to Brashear City and thence across Berwick's Bay; April 9-10. the main body moving thence on Franklin, while Gen. Grover's division was sent by transports up the Atchafalaya and Grand Lake to Irish Bend, above Fort Bisland, where lie effected a landing with great difficulty — the water being, shallow for over a mile from shore, precluding his expected cooperation in Gen. Banks's movement. Here he was soon attacked with vigor, but held his ground and beat off the enemy. Still, the attack sufficed to keep open the road for Gen. Dick Taylor, who, evacuat
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