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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

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l cavalry as had fled west-ward from their discomfiture at Five Forks. At Deep creek, a considerable force of infantry was encountered, April 3. and ultimately driven by the 5th corps. Concentrating at Jetersville, Sheridan had here planted him-self across the railroad, intrenched his infantry, and, supported by his cavalry, prepared to stop Lee's entire force, until Grant and Meade, pursuing, should be able to overtake and crush him. Meade, with the 2d and 6th corps, came up late on the 5th, while Lee was still at Amelia C. H. Thus the provisions which the Confederates at Lynchburg and Danville had collected and prepared to send to Lee were intercepted, and all hope of succor to his sore beset army cut off. Lee left Amelia C. H. at nightfall of the 5th; moving around the left of Meade and Sheridan's position at Jetersville, striking for Farmville, in order to recross there the Appomattox, and, if possible, thus escape his pursuers. But this was not to be. Already, Gen. Dav
way, his rear was barely across the river before dawn; April 7. and the bridges were only fired, not consumed, when the van of our 2d corps (Humphreys's)--which had now taken the lead — rushed up and saved that on the wagon-road. The rail-road bridge was destroyed. Barlow's division was soon over the river, expecting a fight, as the enemy threatened it; but there was only a rearguard left, and they soon retired; blowing up a bridge-head, and abandoning 18 guns. During the night of the 6th, many of the chief officers of the fleeing army met around a bivouac-fire to discuss their desperate situation. Upon a full survey, they unanimously concluded that a capitulation was inevitable. Even if they were yet strong enough to beat off and cut through the host of pursuers so sharp upon their trail, they could only do so by the sacrifice of their remaining guns and munitions, and in a state of utter inefficiency from famine. Already, weakness and fatigue had compelled half of their f
cavalry, had started again on the morning of the 7th; Merritt, with two divisions, moving by the left to Prince Edward C. H., to head off Lee from retreating on Danville. This was a miscalculation; and exposed Crook, who, with the remaining division, with difficulty forded the Appomattox near Farmville, to repulse from a body of Rebel infantry defending a train which they charged; our Gen. Gregg being here captured. So our brilliant successes of the 6th were followed by none whatever on the 7th. Pursuit was resumed by all hands on the morning of the 8th; the 2d and 6th corps, under Meade, moving north of the Appomattox, or directly on the trail of the enemy; while Sheridan, undeceived as to Lee's making for Danville, led his cavalry to head him off from Lynchburg, his only remaining refuge. Ord's and Griffin's corps followed the cavalry; but of course did not keep pace with them. Sheridan — Crook having already, by order, recrossed the Appomattox — concentrated his troopers o
er side were appointed; but the day's work was done by the chiefs, and its result summed up in these concluding letters: Appomattox Court House, Va., April 9, 1865. General — In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th instant, I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit: Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate; one copy to be given to an officer to be designated by me, the other to be retainedrthern Va., April 9, 1865. General — I received your letter of this date, containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia as proposed by you. As they are substantially the same as those expressed in your letter of the 8th instant, they are accepted. I will proceed to designate the proper officers to carry the stipulations into effect. R. E. Lee, General. Lt-General U. S. Grant. The parting of Lee with his devoted followers was a sad one. Of the proud army which,
such spirit that the thinned line of the enemy recoiled before it, and their strongly intrenched picket-line was wrested from them and permanently held by their antagonists. Thus, instead of shaking himself free from Grant's gripe, Lee had only tightened it by this bold stroke; rendering his withdrawal to North Carolina even more difficult and hazardous than before. Grant had already Dated March 24. prepared, if not issued, his order for a general, determined advance by his left on the 29th. To the obvious reasons which had formerly impelled a movement to flank the enemy's right was now added the necessity of intercepting and precluding Lee's withdrawal to North Carolina. Hence, the strategy of a nearly simultaneous attack on both flanks of the Rebel position was now abandoned: three divisions of the Army of the James, now commanded by Ord, being withdrawn March 27. from the banks of the James, where it had so long menaced Richmond, and brought over to the left of our lines
January 11th (search for this): chapter 34
he 2d corps was held, and our left thus permanently extended to Hatcher's run. The Rebels in Northern Virginia evinced the greater activity during the Winter. Aside from sundry inconsiderable but annoying dashes through our lines at several points, by the alert, ubiquitous guerrilla, Moseby, Gen. Rosser, with a mounted force, slipped across the main range of the Alleghanies into West Virginia; surprising Beverly, Randolph county; which was held by a garrison of 700, who were caught Jan. 11. sound asleep, with pickets only 300 yards from their camp; 400 of them made prisoners, the residue dispersed, and much spoil secured in the shape of horses, commissary's and quarter-master's stores. All that could be carried off in their haste was taken; the residue destroyed. Lt. McNiel, with a squad of Rebel cavalry, dashed into Cumberland, Md., about 3 A. M.; Feb. 21. seizing Maj.-Gens. Kelley and Crook in their beds, mounting them on horses, and hurrying them off to Richmond. T
February 5th (search for this): chapter 34
rom one of our batteries; while the Virginia received a 300-pound bolt from a monitor which killed 5 of her crew. Firing was continued on both sides throughout the day; and at night the Rebel fleet — all but the Drewry — drew back to Richmond. The next effort on our side was made — probably with intent mainly to develop the strength with which the Rebel lines confronting ours were still held — on the old beaten and bloody track ; the 5th and 2d corps, with Gregg's cavalry, pushing out Feb. 5. from our left to Reams's station, and thence to Dinwiddie C. H.: the 5th corps being directed to turn the Rebel right, while the 2d assailed it in front. The two corps having taken position on the Rebel flank — Smythe's division and McAllister's brigade of Mott's having gallantly repulsed the enemy's attempt to turn the right of the former — Gregg's cavalry were drawn back from Dinwiddie C. H. to Warren's left, which, under Crawford, was now Feb. 6. thrown forward to Dabney's mill,
February 6th (search for this): chapter 34
, with Gregg's cavalry, pushing out Feb. 5. from our left to Reams's station, and thence to Dinwiddie C. H.: the 5th corps being directed to turn the Rebel right, while the 2d assailed it in front. The two corps having taken position on the Rebel flank — Smythe's division and McAllister's brigade of Mott's having gallantly repulsed the enemy's attempt to turn the right of the former — Gregg's cavalry were drawn back from Dinwiddie C. H. to Warren's left, which, under Crawford, was now Feb. 6. thrown forward to Dabney's mill, whence he drove a Rebel force under Gen. Pegram, who was killed. By this time, the enemy had sent a strong force around our left, to strike it in flank and rear, after the Stonewall Jackson fashion. Gregg's cavalry was first assailed by this force, and pushed back to Hatcher's run; Ayres's division, which was hurrying up to the support of Crawford, was next stricken in flank while marching, and pushed back; when the blow fell on Crawford, who was likewise
February 21st (search for this): chapter 34
s into West Virginia; surprising Beverly, Randolph county; which was held by a garrison of 700, who were caught Jan. 11. sound asleep, with pickets only 300 yards from their camp; 400 of them made prisoners, the residue dispersed, and much spoil secured in the shape of horses, commissary's and quarter-master's stores. All that could be carried off in their haste was taken; the residue destroyed. Lt. McNiel, with a squad of Rebel cavalry, dashed into Cumberland, Md., about 3 A. M.; Feb. 21. seizing Maj.-Gens. Kelley and Crook in their beds, mounting them on horses, and hurrying them off to Richmond. The loss was small; but the impunity with which it was inflicted argued extreme looseness and inefficiency in the picketing and guarding of our lines. Of course, such an enterprise was not attempted without preconcert with traitors on our side. Gen. Sheridan, still in command in the Valley, was instructed by Gen. Grant to open the campaign of 1865 in Virginia by a magnificent
February 27th (search for this): chapter 34
d guarding of our lines. Of course, such an enterprise was not attempted without preconcert with traitors on our side. Gen. Sheridan, still in command in the Valley, was instructed by Gen. Grant to open the campaign of 1865 in Virginia by a magnificent and daring cavalry raid aimed at Lynch-burg and the Rebel communications generally, but with liberty to Sheridan to move southward until he reenforced Sherman — still deficient in cavalry — if that should seem advisable. Sheridan left Feb. 27. Winchester with 10,000 men — all mounted — and moved so rapidly as to save the bridge at Mount Crawford across the middle fork of the Shenandoah; passing through Staunton, March 2. and hurling himself on Early, who had made a stand in his intrenchments at Waynesboroa, at the head of some 2,500 men; who were almost instantly routed, with a loss of 1,600 prisoners, 11 guns, 17 flags, and 200 loaded wagons. In fact, there was little left of Early's force but Early himself. The prisoners
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