hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William T. Sherman 512 6 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 452 0 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 431 1 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 404 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 400 0 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 332 2 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 331 7 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant 326 8 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 325 1 Browse Search
Ambrose E. Burnside 297 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. Search the whole document.

Found 7,007 total hits in 1,194 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
the Union and its flag which were the more admirable because passive, and thus unnoted and unknown. Among these may be reckoned the preservation to the Union of Fort McHenry, at Baltimore, by Capt. [since, Maj.-Gen.] John C. Robinson, 5th infantry, who, with a handful of men, held that important position during the four weeks which separated the bloody triumph of the Rebel mob in the slaughter of the Massachusetts men (April 19, 1861) from the bloodless recovery of Baltimore by Gen. Butler, May 13. Had the fort, with its arms and munitions, been given up by its defenders, its repossession, with that of Baltimore, could only have been secured by a lavish outlay of effort and of blood on the part of the Union. VIII. it is the author's well known conviction that Disunion was not purposed by the great body of those who originally favored Secession. They went into the movement, not to divide the country, but to obtain new guaranties and advantages for Slavery throughout the whole
September 1st (search for this): chapter 36
gn incompatible with thorough loyalty to his commander, is scarcely denied; but good soldiers, who were with him throughout, testified on his trial that his acts were unexceptionable. The court, however, decided otherwise. The following dispatch from Gen. Pope, written the second morning after his defeat at Gainesvilie, refers unquestionably to Porter as one commander of a corps, and is here given only as proving Gen. Pope's convictions as to the causes of his disaster: Centerville, Sept. 1--8:50 A. M. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief: All was quiet yesterday, and so far this morning. My men all resting. They need it much. Forage for our horses is being brought up. Our cavalry is completely broken down, so that there are not five horses to a company that can raise a trot. The consequence is, that I am forced to keep considerable infantry along the roads in my rear to make them secure; and even then it is difficult to keep the enemy's cavalry off the roads. I sha
uka, 223-4; attacks Morgan, 271; charges into Franklin, 272; wounded at Franklin, Tenn., 683. Stannard, Brig.-Gen., of Vermont, wounded at Gettysburg, 388. Stanton, Edwin M., appointed Secretary of War, 81; 82; 108; 186; to McClellan, after battle of Fair Oaks, 149-150; to McClellan, about Jackson's movements, 151-2. Stark, Gen., killed at Antietam, 206. Starkweather, Gen., at Perryville, 219. State authority over militia, 488. State Elections, 486; account of, 508-10; the October, of 1864, 671-3. St. Charles, Ark., Carr fights Shelby at, 554. Steedman, Capt., naval expedition, 459. Steedman, Gen. J. B., at Chickamauga, 422; at Nashville, 686. Steele, Gen. F., at Yazoo Bluffs, 289; at Fort Hindman, 293; at Vicksburg, 311; captures Little Rock, 451-2; in Arkansas in 1864, 536; advances to Camden. 552; attacked at Jenkins's ferry, 553-4; storms Blakely, 723. Stein, Col., Ohio, killed at Stone River, 281. Stein, Gen., 27; killed at Prairie Grove, 40.
, N. C., Jo. Johnston attacks at, 707. Bidwell, Gen., killed at Cedar Creek, 615. Big Black, Gen. Grant crosses the, 309. Birkenhead (Eng.), Southern war cruisers built by English merchants at, 648. Birney, Gen., charges the enemy near Chantilly, 188; at Fredericksburg, 347; at Chancellorsville. 357; his report, 889; services in Florida, 532; at the Wilderness, 568. Black, Col., 5th Ga., killed at Stone River, 282. Black soldiers in the Revolutionary War, 511; in the War of 1812, 514; in the Rebellion, 515. Black, Col. Samuel W., 62d Pa., killed at Gaines's Mill, 157. Blair, Gen. F. P., at Vicksburg, 310; with Sherman in his Great March, 689 to 695; he menaces Charleston, 696; crosses the Edisto. 699. Blakely, Ala., attacked by Steele, 723. Blenker, Gen. Louis, sent to West Virginia, 130. blockade runner, escape of a, 472; a British runner forced to hoist the white flag, 473. blockade-running ended at Charleston, 482. Blunt, Gen. Jas. G., 36; joi
lle, 212; moves on Chattanooga, 213; advances against Bragg, 217; part of his army assailed at Perryville, 220-1; his official report, 221; relieved by Gen. Rosecrans, 222. Buford, Gen., relieves Gen. Hatch, 175; guards the fords of the Upper Rapidan, 175; reports the enemy crossing Raccoon Ford, 175; services of his cavalry at Great Run 179; commands at Manassas Gap, 393; skirmish, 394. Bullen, Major, relieves Donaldsonville, 338. Bull Run second, battle of, 185-6; map of the field, 1847; Jackson's report of, 188-9. Burbridge, Gen., at Fort Hindman, 293; at Vicksburg, 315. Burke, Col., 63d New York, relieves General Meagher at Antietam, 208. Burks, Col., Texas, killed at Stone River, 282. Burnside, Gen. Ambrose E., his expedition sails from Fortress Monroe, 73; operations of, on the North Carolina coast, 73-81; captures Roanoke Island, 75-6: Newbern, 77; Fort Macon, 78; at South Mills, 79-80; returned to Fortress Monroe, 80; allusion to, 127; commands a division a
December 19th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 36
have been secured by a lavish outlay of effort and of blood on the part of the Union. VIII. it is the author's well known conviction that Disunion was not purposed by the great body of those who originally favored Secession. They went into the movement, not to divide the country, but to obtain new guaranties and advantages for Slavery throughout the whole of it. The following dispatch to the New York Herald of Dec. 20, 1860, tends to strengthen this conviction: Baltimore, Dec. 19, 1860. Judge Hand, Commissioner from Mississippi to Maryland, addressed an audience of about 5,000 citizens to-night in the Maryland Institute. He advocated the right of separate secession, which was received with considerable applause. He strongly recommended that the Southern States secede before Lincoln's inauguration, and asserted that all the cotton States were determined to do so. He wanted the entire South to join them, and then to form a compact until they could be guaranteed all
December 20th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 36
y its defenders, its repossession, with that of Baltimore, could only have been secured by a lavish outlay of effort and of blood on the part of the Union. VIII. it is the author's well known conviction that Disunion was not purposed by the great body of those who originally favored Secession. They went into the movement, not to divide the country, but to obtain new guaranties and advantages for Slavery throughout the whole of it. The following dispatch to the New York Herald of Dec. 20, 1860, tends to strengthen this conviction: Baltimore, Dec. 19, 1860. Judge Hand, Commissioner from Mississippi to Maryland, addressed an audience of about 5,000 citizens to-night in the Maryland Institute. He advocated the right of separate secession, which was received with considerable applause. He strongly recommended that the Southern States secede before Lincoln's inauguration, and asserted that all the cotton States were determined to do so. He wanted the entire South to join
. Army Deficiency bill before the Senate, 526. army of the Cumberland, reorganized by Rosecrans, 270. army of the Ohio, composition of, under Buell; reorganized by Rosecrans, 270. army of the Potomac, inactivity of during the Winter of 1861-2, 107; organized into four corps by the President, 108; transported to Fortress Monroe, 110; advance to Manassas, 112; Peninsular campaign, 120 to 127; strength of, in Winter of 1861-2, 128-9; strength of, in April, 1862, 131; in McClellan's camp1861-2, 128-9; strength of, in April, 1862, 131; in McClellan's campaign before Richmond, 141 to 172; strength of, in June, 1862, 151159; at Harrison's Landing, 168; losses sustained by, during the Seven Days battles, 168-9; strength of, in July, 1862, 169; withdrawn from Harrison's Landing to Acquia Creek, 171; under command of Gens. Burnside and Hooker, 342 to 375; reorganized under Meade, 564; end of Grant's campaign of 1864 and losses of the, 597 Arnold, Gen., occupies Pensacola, 459. arson, during N. York and Brooklyn riots, 505. Asboth, Gen. Alex.
April, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 36
ants and other citizens — no less than $1,351,27 5, whereof $1,181,506 was clear income. Philadelphia, Boston, Baltimore, Chicago, Pittsburg, Albany, and most other cities, held similar fairs with corresponding results: the aggregate of contributions received and disbursed through this channel amounting to about $5,000,000 in cash and $9,000,000 in supplies. Those of the Christian Commission amounted to $4,500,000. And these are but samples of a work which, beginning with a subscription in April and May, 1861, of $179,500 in New York to form a Union defense fund for the equipment and subsistence of Volunteers, was maintained with unflagging spirit to the close of the struggle-Com. Vanderbilt's magnificent present of the noble steamship Vanderbilt, valued at $1,000,000, being the largest individual offering; but many a poor widow or girl doing as much, in proportion to her scanty resources. The Union Refreshment Saloons, wherein Philadelphia was honorably conspicuous, for the supply
April 19th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 36
Army or Navy, these were relieved by instances of heroic devotion to the Union and its flag which were the more admirable because passive, and thus unnoted and unknown. Among these may be reckoned the preservation to the Union of Fort McHenry, at Baltimore, by Capt. [since, Maj.-Gen.] John C. Robinson, 5th infantry, who, with a handful of men, held that important position during the four weeks which separated the bloody triumph of the Rebel mob in the slaughter of the Massachusetts men (April 19, 1861) from the bloodless recovery of Baltimore by Gen. Butler, May 13. Had the fort, with its arms and munitions, been given up by its defenders, its repossession, with that of Baltimore, could only have been secured by a lavish outlay of effort and of blood on the part of the Union. VIII. it is the author's well known conviction that Disunion was not purposed by the great body of those who originally favored Secession. They went into the movement, not to divide the country, but to
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...