hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Gordon Meade 380 2 Browse Search
Ulysses Simpson Grant 296 0 Browse Search
Theodore Lyman 171 1 Browse Search
Winfield Scott Hancock 160 0 Browse Search
Gouverneur Kemble Warren 158 0 Browse Search
Robert Lee 135 1 Browse Search
Horatio Gouverneur Wright 122 0 Browse Search
Andrew Atkinson Humphreys 112 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 107 1 Browse Search
Phil Sheridan 80 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). Search the whole document.

Found 314 total hits in 129 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
R. G. Shaw (search for this): chapter 7
. Now B. has few equals in the power of turning things end for end; and so he at once and clearly understood that he [was] made a sort of almoner of tobacco, and proceeded to distribute the cigars in the most liberal manner, to everybody who would either smoke or pocket them! The Staff and bystanders asked no questions, but puffed away at Grant's prime Havanas. Arrived at Hancock's and supper done, the General said to Porter: I think now is the moment to enjoy those good cigars! Out comes Shaw, the faithful servitor. Oh, if you please, Major, the Gen'ral sends his compliments, sir: and would like that bunch of cigars, sir. Biddle immediately assumed the attitude indicated in the accompanying drawing! and the curtain dropped. . . . October 27, 1864 I won't write at length till I get a decent chance. I caught the greatest pelting with all sorts of artillery projectiles to-day, you ever saw, but no hurt therefrom. I could not help being amused, despite the uncomfortable situa
Arthur Divett Hayter (search for this): chapter 7
ed to fire in many parts, being near the enemy; so that you have to stoop a good deal of the way. What did Biddle do but ride out by a road to the works, on horseback! In consequence of which the whole skirmish line opened on him, and he returned, after his inspection, quite gasping with excitement. As he was not hit, it was very funny. If there is a wrong road, he's sure to take it. Lord Mahon (son of the Earl of Stanhope, who presided at that literary dinner I went to at London) and Captain Hayter, both of the Guards, were down here — Spoons rather, especially the nobil Lord. October 7, 1864 There is a certain General Benham, who commands the engineers at City Point, and was up about laying out some works. Channing Clapp is on his Staff. You ought to see this Ginral. He has the face and figure of Mr. Briggs and wears continually the expression of Mr. B. when his horse sat down at the band of music. When he had got through all the explanations, which were sufficient to have
Orlando Bolivar Willcox (search for this): chapter 7
hree of heavy calibre, also some prisoners. General Ord was shot in the thick of the leg, above the knee. There was another line, on the crest beyond, which I do not think we attacked at all. We went down then to the Jones house, where were Parke's Headquarters, and talked with him. I saw there Charlie Mills, now on his Staff. Finally, at 1.30 we got to Globe Tavern where was the astute Warren. Everything was set, as he would say, for an advance by Griffin's and Ayres's divisions, while Willcox's and Potter's divisions of the 9th Corps were massed at the Gurley house, ready to support. General Gregg made an advance west of Reams' station, and was heavily attacked about 5 P. M., but repulsed them. Their artillery blew up one of his caissons and we could see the cloud of smoke suddenly rise above the trees. This was all for that day in the way of fighting. [Colonel Lyman wrote on October 4 the following paragraph:] October 4, 1864 To-day I have ridden along the new lines w
Charles Hale Morgan (search for this): chapter 7
ee. Rosey drew me aside with an air of mystery and told me that the whole army was ordered to be packed and ready at four the next morning, all prepared to march at a moment's notice. Thursday, September 29. Headquarters contented itself by getting up about half-past 5, which was plenty early enough, as turned out. We rode down to General Hancock's about 9.30. He was camped not far from us, or had been, for now his tents were struck and packed, and there lay the familiar forms of Lieutenant-Colonel Morgan and Major Mitchell, on some boards, trying to make up for their loss of sleep. The cheery Hancock was awake and lively. We here were near the point of the railroad, which excited General Meade's indignation by its exposure. Now they have partly sunk it and partly built a bank, on the enemy's side, so that it is covered from fire. Here we got news that Ord and Birney had crossed the James, the first near Dutch Gap, the other near Deep Bottom, and advanced towards Richmond. Birn
Romeyn Beck Ayres (search for this): chapter 7
ills, now on his Staff. Finally, at 1.30 we got to Globe Tavern where was the astute Warren. Everything was set, as he would say, for an advance by Griffin's and Ayres's divisions, while Willcox's and Potter's divisions of the 9th Corps were massed at the Gurley house, ready to support. General Gregg made an advance west of Reamf our men and a corporal was marking their names on a headboard, copying from letters found in their pockets. Parke was now ordered to form on the left of Warren (Ayres being on the right of Griffin), and it was understood that the whole line would then advance from its present position, near the Pegram house, and see if it were p perils of the keg cannon. General Warren has a short leave, and General Crawford commands the Corps, to the indignation, I presume, of old cocks like Griffin and Ayres; for C. was doctor in Fort Sumter, and thus got a star, and thus is an old brigadier, and thus ranks the regulars G. and A. General Grant was on a flying visit to
George Warren Dresser (search for this): chapter 7
elbow. Then Major Roebling rode into a Rebel line of battle and had his orderly killed in his escape; Major Bingham was captured, but scared his guard so by telling him he was within our lines, that the man took to the bushes and left him. Lieutenant Dresser rode into the midst of a Rebel brigade, thinking they were prisoners. Where is the Provost guard? asked D., who luckily had a gray rubber coat on. Hain't got none. What troops are these? Fourth Alabama. Oh, all right, says Dresser, withDresser, with presence of mind, and rides off, very slow at first, and very fast as soon as out of sight! The best feat was that of Major Mitchell (he always does perform feats). He rode into the woods, saw 200 Rebel infantry who had got lost, and were drawn up in line; came back, got a regiment, went out again and gobbled them all up. . . . [The letter finishes with a lively description of some curious visitors to Headquarters.] I had got safely to the Peeble house and was watching the columns as th
Vicomte Mont (search for this): chapter 7
, and a light blue kepi. To complete his costume, a row of medals stretched from his central buttonhole to the point of his shoulder! The second stranger was utterly incomprehensible. He had on a pair of red, military trousers, a red fez with a blue tassel, and a black dress-coat! In order to mark this simple costume, he had, with admirable taste, suspended a small stiletto from the lower buttonhole of his waistcoat. The kepi was presented as Chef-de-bataillon de Boissac; the fez as Vicomte de Mont-barthe. Upon which, to myself within myself said I: strike out the de and Boissac is correct; strike out Vicomte and substitute Corporal and we shall be pretty near Mr. Fez. He was one of the vulgarest of vulgar Frenchmen, and a fool into the bargain. De Boissac was a type, and I fancy the real thing; a regular, chatty, boastful, conceited, bright little Gaul, who had been in China, the Crimea, Italy, Japan, and Africa, and had worn the hair off his little bullet head with serving in
George Gordon Meade (search for this): chapter 7
ay have I been on the Weldon railroad with General Meade, and I must slap to bed, for I am most slehe division then got over and kept ahead. General Meade, meantime, staid at the Globe Tavern, waitths of a mile beyond. As I understand it, General Meade's orders were not properly carried out; fo. What's that redoubt doing there? cries General Meade. Don't know; didn't put it there, replies reased the suspicion that word was sent to General Meade, who ordered a regiment at once to proceedeserving the public morality. Yes, replies Father Meade, that seems all right; now you want to slas presently. It is an historical fact that General Meade expressed his gratification at this deep h pelican, just after a surfeit of sprats. General Meade received them with his usual high ceremonyfreight of military and diplomatic jewels, General Meade accompanied it, with Biddle, Mason and Rosshouts, how, at City Point Grant had given General Meade a bunch of cigars to beguile the way of hi[11 more...]
Arthur Philip Stanhope (search for this): chapter 7
t the pickets were properly arranged. This part of the works is much exposed to fire in many parts, being near the enemy; so that you have to stoop a good deal of the way. What did Biddle do but ride out by a road to the works, on horseback! In consequence of which the whole skirmish line opened on him, and he returned, after his inspection, quite gasping with excitement. As he was not hit, it was very funny. If there is a wrong road, he's sure to take it. Lord Mahon (son of the Earl of Stanhope, who presided at that literary dinner I went to at London) and Captain Hayter, both of the Guards, were down here — Spoons rather, especially the nobil Lord. October 7, 1864 There is a certain General Benham, who commands the engineers at City Point, and was up about laying out some works. Channing Clapp is on his Staff. You ought to see this Ginral. He has the face and figure of Mr. Briggs and wears continually the expression of Mr. B. when his horse sat down at the band of music.
S. Barstow (search for this): chapter 7
group of these gentlemen, going on foot and with their carpet-bags towards the front, were addressed by a veteran with Hullo! Got any lemons to sell? No, my friend, we belong to the army of the Lord. Veteran, with deep scorn: Oh, ye — es; stragglers! Stragglers! I respect these Christian Commissioners, though they are somewhat silly often. Some of them had come all the way from Wisconsin. I arrived in camp somewhat after dark and was tenderly welcomed by all, from the General down. Barstow and Humphreys were highly pleased with their gifts. To-day a curious thing occurred. While I was away, looking for a place for the new camp, General Meade rode out with the Staff. There came a conical shell, which shaved a patch of hair off the tail of General Humphrey's horse, scraped the leg of General Meade's boot, passed between General Ricketts and Griffin who were standing within a foot of each other, and buried itself in the ground, covering several officers with sand and dirt. F
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...