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Henry Eugene Davies (search for this): chapter 7
leg, I lay on the field and the Emperor himself pinned the cross on my breast! I could not help thinking what a pity it was that the wounds had not been higher up, whereby the Emperor would have been saved the expense of a cross, and I the trouble of listening to his stories. These two brave bucks were travelling on their good looks, having got down, the Lord knows how, with no letters to anybody; yet they dined with General Meade, and passed the night in camp; passed another night at General Davies', and, the last I heard of them, were pledging General Hancock in the national whiskey! . . . I omitted to mention a third ornament to military life, a gent with eagles on his shoulders, who, on enquiry, turned out to be a brother militia man, and a great credit to the service, as he perilled his life daily. in the state of New York, as General Sanford's aide (commanding state militia), and now was visiting the army to see that justice was done to deserving non-commissioned officers in
I respect these Christian Commissioners, though they are somewhat silly often. Some of them had come all the way from Wisconsin. I arrived in camp somewhat after dark and was tenderly welcomed by all, from the General down. Barstow and Humphreys were highly pleased with their gifts. To-day a curious thing occurred. While I was away, looking for a place for the new camp, General Meade rode out with the Staff. There came a conical shell, which shaved a patch of hair off the tail of General Humphrey's horse, scraped the leg of General Meade's boot, passed between General Ricketts and Griffin who were standing within a foot of each other, and buried itself in the ground, covering several officers with sand and dirt. Four Generals just escaping by a turn of the head, so to speak! I got this shell and shall send it home as a great curiosity. October 3, 1864, to-wit Monday The night of my arrival, curiously enough, was the eve of a grand movement. The move now proposed consits
e would say to the T. G's: What do you think, hey? How would you like to attack that, hey? Upon which the T. G's, whose pantaloons were somewhat up their legs, would look dubious. As he beheld the wonders of the land, he would exclaim: Oh, bless my soul! why, you know, we have no idea of this at home. Oh, bless my soul! On the road we met a Rebel deserter, who chanced to be an Irishman, whereat the Doyle was highly delighted and asked him if he got much whiskey the other side. To which Pat replied with regret, that that strengthening beverage cost $30 a quart in Secessia. After trotting him all over creation and giving him a lunch, we put him on top of the Avery house, and let him look at Rebs through a telescope; but I am sure he saw nothing, though he exclaimed, Bless my soul! a great deal. October 14, 1864 How shall I vote? I don't know that I shall be given the chance; but, if I am, I shall vote for the blue-blooded Abraham. It was with a feeling of depression that
nsible. He had on a pair of red, military trousers, a red fez with a blue tassel, and a black dress-coat! In order to mark this simple costume, he had, with admirable taste, suspended a small stiletto from the lower buttonhole of his waistcoat. The kepi was presented as Chef-de-bataillon de Boissac; the fez as Vicomte de Mont-barthe. Upon which, to myself within myself said I: strike out the de and Boissac is correct; strike out Vicomte and substitute Corporal and we shall be pretty near Mr. Fez. He was one of the vulgarest of vulgar Frenchmen, and a fool into the bargain. De Boissac was a type, and I fancy the real thing; a regular, chatty, boastful, conceited, bright little Gaul, who had been in China, the Crimea, Italy, Japan, and Africa, and had worn the hair off his little bullet head with serving in various climes. I was promoted to be Chef-de-bataillon, said kepi (just as if I had asked anything about it), for having planted the flag, alone, on the rampart! My comrades c
Edward Otho Cresap Ord (search for this): chapter 7
e's indignation by its exposure. Now they have partly sunk it and partly built a bank, on the enemy's side, so that it is covered from fire. Here we got news that Ord and Birney had crossed the James, the first near Dutch Gap, the other near Deep Bottom, and advanced towards Richmond. Birney went up the New-market road, took a line of works, and joined Ord, who took a strong line, with a fort, on Chapin's farm, which is before Chapin's bluff, which again is opposite Fort Darling. We got sixteen guns, including three of heavy calibre, also some prisoners. General Ord was shot in the thick of the leg, above the knee. There was another line, on the crest General Ord was shot in the thick of the leg, above the knee. There was another line, on the crest beyond, which I do not think we attacked at all. We went down then to the Jones house, where were Parke's Headquarters, and talked with him. I saw there Charlie Mills, now on his Staff. Finally, at 1.30 we got to Globe Tavern where was the astute Warren. Everything was set, as he would say, for an advance by Griffin's and Ayres's
Theodore Lyman (search for this): chapter 7
VI. the siege of Petersburg [the next day Lyman was surprised to have Meade say to him. I think I must order you home to get me some ca fifteen-day leave, and the aides tendered their congratulations. Lyman was bound for Richmond on secret service! So the Staff persuaded tecovered, however, when tendered a cocktail as a peace offering. Lyman's visit to the North proved longer than he expected. For, shortly after his arrival in Beverly, where Mrs. Lyman was passing the summer, he had an attack of malaria which kept him in bed for some time. Accorby the way; and, secondly, to prevent Lee from reinforcing Early. --Lyman's Journal. I never miss, you see. Rosey drew me aside with an air oe trees. This was all for that day in the way of fighting. [Colonel Lyman wrote on October 4 the following paragraph:] October 4, 1864 at it was quite pleasant all round. [In writing some days later, Lyman thus describes the country over which this engagement was fought:]
Andrew Atkinson Humphreys (search for this): chapter 7
Wisconsin. I arrived in camp somewhat after dark and was tenderly welcomed by all, from the General down. Barstow and Humphreys were highly pleased with their gifts. To-day a curious thing occurred. While I was away, looking for a place for the n back in confusion. Griffin had advanced and restored the retired line. And who rides hither so placidly? It is General Humphreys: he has stolen off and, bless his old soul, has been having a real nice time, right in the line of battle! A prettsh him, and communicated the same with much eloquence, by the instrumentality of the magnetic telegraph; whereat Major-General Humphreys, Chief-of-Staff, had the brutality to laugh! We made our usual peregrination to Globe Tavern, where we got aboue can order — just order what groceries he pleases, and no questions asked behind the counter! October 10, 1864 General Humphreys deserted us to-night, for a brief leave — no, of course I mean he went early this morning, having taken his breakfa
Baldy Smith (search for this): chapter 7
l. I have arranged it all with the steward; we shall sit together, said this foxy one. Long before the hour, they all went down and stood against the door, like the queue at a French theatre. One of them came up, a little after, wiping his mouth; and asked me with surprising suddenness, if I was on the side of the Lord. They were mostly Methodists, and of course very pious. One of the soldiers on the lower deck, suddenly cried out: Oh, H----! upon which a Christian Commissioner said: Mr. Smith, did you think to bring a bundle of the tracts on swearing? I told him I hoped he had brought a good many, and of several kinds, as there was a wide field in the army. All of which reminds me of an anecdote. A group of these gentlemen, going on foot and with their carpet-bags towards the front, were addressed by a veteran with Hullo! Got any lemons to sell? No, my friend, we belong to the army of the Lord. Veteran, with deep scorn: Oh, ye — es; stragglers! Stragglers! I respect the
Abou Ben Butler (search for this): chapter 7
Potter! it wasn't his fault. Our extreme advance was driven back, but the day was a great success, with important strategic bearing. October 2, 1864 Taking up the narrative of the events of this day. The letter was written on the 6th. Abou Ben Butler had quite a stampede last night. Having got so far away from home, he conceived that the whole southern host was massed to crush him, and communicated the same with much eloquence, by the instrumentality of the magnetic telegraph; whereat MThey flank us on the Weldon railroad and brush off 2000 prisoners: no use! we hold the road. They flank us again at the Pegram house, and capture 1000 more: no use; we hold the Pegram position and add it to former acquisitions. Then they flank Butler and get eight of his guns; but they have to go back, and Benjamin remains in what General Halleck terms a threatening attitude. . . . Yesterday, Loring, whom I saw over at General Parke's Headquarters, was speaking of the quaint ways of talking a
Channing Clapp (search for this): chapter 7
nd he returned, after his inspection, quite gasping with excitement. As he was not hit, it was very funny. If there is a wrong road, he's sure to take it. Lord Mahon (son of the Earl of Stanhope, who presided at that literary dinner I went to at London) and Captain Hayter, both of the Guards, were down here — Spoons rather, especially the nobil Lord. October 7, 1864 There is a certain General Benham, who commands the engineers at City Point, and was up about laying out some works. Channing Clapp is on his Staff. You ought to see this Ginral. He has the face and figure of Mr. Briggs and wears continually the expression of Mr. B. when his horse sat down at the band of music. When he had got through all the explanations, which were sufficient to have laid out a permanent work of the first class, the Meade rose with weariness, and eased his spirit by riding out and looking at my new camp-ground, and inspecting those everlasting redoubts. Now that the camp is arranged, the Meade
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