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James Brewerton Ricketts (search for this): chapter 7
ome of them had come all the way from Wisconsin. I arrived in camp somewhat after dark and was tenderly welcomed by all, from the General down. Barstow and Humphreys were highly pleased with their gifts. To-day a curious thing occurred. While I was away, looking for a place for the new camp, General Meade rode out with the Staff. There came a conical shell, which shaved a patch of hair off the tail of General Humphrey's horse, scraped the leg of General Meade's boot, passed between General Ricketts and Griffin who were standing within a foot of each other, and buried itself in the ground, covering several officers with sand and dirt. Four Generals just escaping by a turn of the head, so to speak! I got this shell and shall send it home as a great curiosity. October 3, 1864, to-wit Monday The night of my arrival, curiously enough, was the eve of a grand movement. The move now proposed consitsted of an advance both on the right and the left flanks. On the right, towards Ri
James Chatham Duane (search for this): chapter 7
wounded of not less than 1200. In fact, we cannot stir without losing more men than would make a big battle in the West, and the Rebels, if we have any chance at them, lose as many. Last Sunday, which I was just speaking of, was marked by the arrival of one Alden, a rather dull Captain of the Adjutant-General's Department, who was however a welcome bird to the army, as he brought a large number of brevets for many deserving officers. . . . To my surprise there did appear, or reappear, Major Duane, who has taken to visiting me as usual. He is better, but not well. To celebrate his arrival, and to retaliate for our rush into the Mine, the Rebs made a dash on our picket line, gobbled up some fifty stupids, who (being recruits) thought it was the relief coming round, and were then driven back; upon which, of course, every man fired off his musket a few times, to show how alert he was, the artillery threw all the shells whose fuses happened to be ready cut, and then all went to sleep
William Tecumseh Sherman (search for this): chapter 7
proved longer than he expected. For, shortly after his arrival in Beverly, where Mrs. Lyman was passing the summer, he had an attack of malaria which kept him in bed for some time. According to the doctors, The northern air, with the late cool change, had brought to the surface the malaria in the system. Consequently, he was not able to rejoin the army until the end of September. Meanwhile, the gloom was lifting, that had settled on the North after the failure to take Petersburg. For Sherman's capture of Atlanta, and Sheridan's victories over Early in the Shenandoah, had somewhat changed the situation, although the Army of the Potomac still lay before Petersburg, where it hovered for many weary months.] Headquarters, Army of Potomac September 28, 1864 It is late; I am somewhat tired and sleepy; I must be up early to-morrow, and many friends keep coming in to say How are you? So you will let me off from a long letter till to-morrow. It is as nat'ral as the hogs here. I h
John Augustus Roebling (search for this): chapter 7
ong the whole front of the new line and carefully examined it, accompanied by his Staff and by the taciturn Roebling. R. is a character, a major and aide-de-camp and engineer, and factotum to General Warren. He is a son of the German engineer, Roebling, who built the celebrated suspension bridge over the Niagara River. He is a light-haired, blue-eyed man, with a countenance as if all the world were an empty show. He stoops a good deal, when riding has the stirrups so long that the tips of hi over his aide's conduct, and kept asking unwary persons: Do you know how Mr. Woolsey escaped from guerillas? and, being answered No, would say: Why, thus! at the same time giving the unwary one a punch in the stomach, with his elbow. Then Major Roebling rode into a Rebel line of battle and had his orderly killed in his escape; Major Bingham was captured, but scared his guard so by telling him he was within our lines, that the man took to the bushes and left him. Lieutenant Dresser rode into
Phil Sheridan (search for this): chapter 7
or, shortly after his arrival in Beverly, where Mrs. Lyman was passing the summer, he had an attack of malaria which kept him in bed for some time. According to the doctors, The northern air, with the late cool change, had brought to the surface the malaria in the system. Consequently, he was not able to rejoin the army until the end of September. Meanwhile, the gloom was lifting, that had settled on the North after the failure to take Petersburg. For Sherman's capture of Atlanta, and Sheridan's victories over Early in the Shenandoah, had somewhat changed the situation, although the Army of the Potomac still lay before Petersburg, where it hovered for many weary months.] Headquarters, Army of Potomac September 28, 1864 It is late; I am somewhat tired and sleepy; I must be up early to-morrow, and many friends keep coming in to say How are you? So you will let me off from a long letter till to-morrow. It is as nat'ral as the hogs here. I have just taken my supper in a tent
— McGregor (search for this): chapter 7
lowing paragraph:] October 4, 1864 To-day I have ridden along the new lines with the General, no fighting but a picket skirmish. I see by the papers funny accounts of the operations on the left; desperate fighting, when there was only some trifling skirmish; our troops going to take Petersburg next morning, which indeed didn't enter their minds. Mr. Stanton (who, I will confess, beats everybody for inaccuracy) puts our forces on the south-side railroad! Even the Associated Press man, McGregor, makes such a hopeless muddle, that I despair of seeing any common observation in any one of them. However, here is your accurate account. Friday, September 30. At 8.30 in the morning, the General, with the combative Humphreys and all the Staff, rode towards the left, stopping of course at the irresistible Hancock's. At noon we got to Globe Tavern, which is some six miles from our old Headquarters. Crawford's division still held the works on the Weldon road, while Warren, with two divi
Frederick Rosencrantz (search for this): chapter 7
pot, and the sergeant to be arrested for not seizing the persons. Who do you think they were? Why, Captain Craig and Rosencrantz, taking an evening stroll! Craig has no circulation and turns up his collar whenever the mercury falls below 70 degreair. The pelican came up and bobbed at the Meade, as did his friend. We carted them all to see Fort Wadsworth, where Rosencrantz swears that Mr. Stanton, on being informed that there was only a picket line between him and the enemy, pulled out hisrted with its precious freight of military and diplomatic jewels, General Meade accompanied it, with Biddle, Mason and Rosencrantz. It would appear that they encountered, at City Point, Admiral Porter with Mrs. P. and another lady, who came, on theon, when he gets talking and in company he likes. At nine o'clock came the galliant Generale, with his aides, whereof Rosencrantz and Mason were bursting to tell something good; whereas Biddle had a foolish and deprecatory air. It immediately was r
Christian Commissioner (search for this): chapter 7
ure tickets for the meal. I have arranged it all with the steward; we shall sit together, said this foxy one. Long before the hour, they all went down and stood against the door, like the queue at a French theatre. One of them came up, a little after, wiping his mouth; and asked me with surprising suddenness, if I was on the side of the Lord. They were mostly Methodists, and of course very pious. One of the soldiers on the lower deck, suddenly cried out: Oh, H----! upon which a Christian Commissioner said: Mr. Smith, did you think to bring a bundle of the tracts on swearing? I told him I hoped he had brought a good many, and of several kinds, as there was a wide field in the army. All of which reminds me of an anecdote. A group of these gentlemen, going on foot and with their carpet-bags towards the front, were addressed by a veteran with Hullo! Got any lemons to sell? No, my friend, we belong to the army of the Lord. Veteran, with deep scorn: Oh, ye — es; stragglers! Stra
Gouverneur Kemble Warren (search for this): chapter 7
's division still held the works on the Weldon road, while Warren, with two divisions, followed by Parke, with two divisions movement to develop. He sent out an aide or two, to tell Warren he was there and to bring news of the progress. Warren seWarren sent in word that, having got across the run, he would soon see what could be done. At 12.45 we could hear pretty brisk muskend then ceased. Some time after, an aide came in from General Warren, with news that Griffin had captured a strong line andeir pockets. Parke was now ordered to form on the left of Warren (Ayres being on the right of Griffin), and it was understoa major and aide-de-camp and engineer, and factotum to General Warren. He is a son of the German engineer, Roebling, who buwe rode back again past the perils of the keg cannon. General Warren has a short leave, and General Crawford commands the Cled to leave some of his wounded in a house on the field. Warren would fain fight it out there, for the name of the thing;
t line between him and the enemy, pulled out his watch and said they really must be going back! which indeed they did. When the train started with its precious freight of military and diplomatic jewels, General Meade accompanied it, with Biddle, Mason and Rosencrantz. It would appear that they encountered, at City Point, Admiral Porter with Mrs. P. and another lady, who came, on their return, as far as Hancock's Headquarters. The hospitable H. did thereat cause supper to be set forth, for it was now dark, and the General, with much talk and good humor, took root there; for he is death to hold on, when he gets talking and in company he likes. At nine o'clock came the galliant Generale, with his aides, whereof Rosencrantz and Mason were bursting to tell something good; whereas Biddle had a foolish and deprecatory air. It immediately was related, midst loud shouts, how, at City Point Grant had given General Meade a bunch of cigars to beguile the way of himself, Admiral Porter, and s
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