hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Gordon Meade 380 2 Browse Search
Ulysses Simpson Grant 296 0 Browse Search
Theodore Lyman 171 1 Browse Search
Winfield Scott Hancock 160 0 Browse Search
Gouverneur Kemble Warren 158 0 Browse Search
Robert Lee 135 1 Browse Search
Horatio Gouverneur Wright 122 0 Browse Search
Andrew Atkinson Humphreys 112 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 107 1 Browse Search
Phil Sheridan 80 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). Search the whole document.

Found 852 total hits in 208 results.

... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...
John Aaron Rawlins (search for this): chapter 9
w, but I am going to learn, so as to be able to explain it to people! Then the distinguished militaries crowded round to gaze. Major-General Ord, who can't get over his Irish blood, said: I believe, sir, you are the first man who medalled with his battalion. To which Grant, not taking the point in the faintest degree, replied gravely: I don't know but I was. There was a heavy crowd of Hectors, I can tell you. Generals Meade, Warren, Wright, Parke, Humphreys, Ord, Gibbon, Ayres, Griffin, Rawlins, Ingalls, etc., etc. Very few ladies. After this a moderate collation, and so home to bed. March 13, 1865 We have a long telegram from Sheridan, dated Columbia (a small place on the James, between Lynchburg and Richmond). His raid has been a complete surprise. After defeating Early utterly at Waynesboroa, he met with no further opposition, but entered Charlottesville and destroyed the rail and bridges; then struck south and got to the James, where he destroyed all destructible parts o
Alexander Stewart Webb (search for this): chapter 9
h 3, 1865 Our evanescent Chief-of-Staff, General Webb, has gone to Washington for a day or two, tsent, on any account. Ah! said General Meade, Webb is an anti-evacuationist, because he wants to gere isn't going to be any move at present. General Webb is a good piece of luck, as successor to Geut any adviser at all. My only objection to General Webb is that he continually has a way of suddenl else. As the artist was modelling away at General Webb, he asked: Isn't General Crawford rather annt and return in the afternoon. Poor little Mrs. Webb accompanied the General to our monkish encam any such propositions. And so, poor little Mrs. Webb, aforesaid, had to bid her Andrew adieu. Thstem that holds him up through everything. General Webb was worn out with want of sleep, so I was u to call the attention of the troops, while General Webb followed, crying, Give way to the right! Grthern Virginia has surrendered! Headed by General Webb, we gave three cheers, and three more for G[2 more...]
at his brain did not work at all, or worked all wrong. A quartermaster came up to him and asked by what route he should move his train: to which Marshall replied, in a lucid manner: Tell the Captain that I should have sent that cane as a present to his baby; but I could not, because the baby turned out to be a girl instead of a boy! We were talking there together, when there appeared a great oddity — an old man, with an angular, much-wrinkled face, and long, thick white hair, brushed à la Calhoun; a pair of silver spectacles and a high felt hat further set off the countenance, while the legs kept up their claim of eccentricity by encasing themselves in grey blankets, tied somewhat in a bandit fashion. The whole made up no less a person than Henry A. Wise, once Governor of the loyal state of Virginia, now Brigadier-General and prisoner of war. By his first wife he is Meade's brother-in-law, and had been sent for to see him. I think he is punished already enough: old, sick, impoveris
Robert E. Lee (search for this): chapter 9
ive for, not even his son, who was killed at Roanoke Island, he stood there in his old, wet, grey blanket, glad to accept at our hands a pittance of biscuit and coffee, to save him and his Staff from starvation! While they too talked, I asked General Lee after his son Roonie, He was at Harvard with Lyman. who was about there somewhere. It was the Last ditch indeed! He too is punished enough: living at this moment at Richmond, on the food doled out to him by our government, he gets his ration just like the poorest negro in the place! We left Lee, and kept on through the sad remnants of an army that has its place in history. It would have looked a mighty host, if the ghosts of all its soldiers that now sleep between Gettysburg and Lynchburg could have stood there in the lines, beside the living. Burkeville, Va. Headquarters Army of Potomac April 19, 1865 Lt.-Col. Theo. Lyman, A. D. C. Colonel:--In parting with you after an association of over twenty months, during which t
rest, my mind roused itself to the brilliant hypothesis that this young lady might be the daughter of the Stanton who was Secretary of War. Once on this track, it did not take me over thirty minutes to satisfy myself that I actually had been rendering civilities to the offspring of him who holds the leash of the dogs of war! She is not a roarer, like her paternal, but very subdued and modest, and reminded me of the ci-devant Newport belle, Miss L — C--. . . . Likewise, may we here mention Bradlee pere, a dried — up lawyer of New Jersey, after the fashion of the countenance of Professor Rogers. He was valiant and stuffed his trousers in his boots and clomb an exceeding tall horse, which so pleased another old party, Judge Woodruff, that he did likewise, and subsequently confessed to me that his last equestrian excursion was in 1884; from which I infer, that, at this present writing, Judge Woodruff's legs are more or less totally useless to him as instruments of progression. He had
Gouverneur Kemble Warren (search for this): chapter 9
h Corps Headquarters, on the left of the line. General Warren issued forth and welcomed the ladies to orangesy crowd of Hectors, I can tell you. Generals Meade, Warren, Wright, Parke, Humphreys, Ord, Gibbon, Ayres, Grif about with the General, who confabbed with Wright, Warren, and the gay Humphreys. The latter is confirmed asurch on the left. Whereupon we rode off to see General Warren, who had arrived at the Junction of the Vaughance, and to get time to man their works. As soon as Warren got up the rest of his Corps, he pushed on the attamusketry towards the White Oak road. As we came to Warren's old Headquarters, high up on the Quaker road, I cstwork in their front. As they lay there, resting, Warren struck them in the flank and swung round, even intotersburg and of Richmond! It was midnight when General Warren suddenly came into our camp, followed by only ol had nothing to do with it. I am sorry, for I like Warren. April 2, 1865 Last night was a busy one and a
Edward Ferrero (search for this): chapter 9
ly, which is a hard task for them. As we rode along the corduroy we met sixteen deserters from the enemy, coming in under guard, of whom about a dozen had their muskets, a sight I never saw before! They bring them in, all loaded, and we pay them so much for each weapon. The new line is a very handsome one, with a tremendous sweep of artillery and small arms. To eke out this short letter I enclose the report of the Court of Enquiry on the Mine. You see it gives fits to Burnside, Ledlie, Ferrero, and Willcox, while the last paragraph, though very obscure, is intended, I fancy, as a small snub on General Meade. March 5, 1865 . . . Well, the rain held up and some blue sky began to show, and I mounted on what I shall have to call my Anne of Cleves — for, in the choice words of that first of gentlemen, Henry VIII, she is a great Flanders mare --and rode forth for a little exercise. Verily I conceived we should rester en route, sich was the mud in one or two places! She would keep
James Chatham Duane (search for this): chapter 9
nterior lines. Meantime all is very quiet with us. Last night I certainly heard not over half-a-dozen musket-shots, whereas in the autumn we had a real skirmish fire all the night through, not to speak of intermittent shelling. As I told you, Duane was on hand to welcome me. He looks very well and is better as to his eyes. Then Rosie — had he not, in my honor, caused constructed a new and very high hedge, or shelter, of pine branches, topped off with a tuft of cedar, and a triumphal arch owrote home that night was:] Headquarters Army of the Potomac Sunday, April 2, 1865 11 P. M. my dear Mimi:-- the Rebellion has gone up! Theodore Lyman Lt.-Col. & Vol. A. D.C. April 3, 1865 We began our day early, for, about light, I heard Duane say, outside my tent: They have evacuated Petersburg. Sure enough, they were gone, across the river, and, at that very moment, their troops at Richmond, and all along the river, with their artillery and trains, were marching in all haste, hoping
Maria Jane (search for this): chapter 9
ter of Simon Cameron, a great speck in money, to whom Crawford was very devoted. Then there was Miss Something of Kentucky, who was a perfect flying battery, and melted the hearts of the swains in thim parts; particularly the heart of Lieutenant Wm. Worth, our companion-in-arms, to whom she gave a ring, before either was quite sure of the other's name! In fact, I think her parents must have given her a three-week vacation and a porte-monnaie and said: Go! Get a husband; or give place to Maria Jane, your next younger sister. The gallant Humphreys gave us a review of Miles's division, on top of the concert; whereat General Meade, followed by a bespattered crowd of generals, Staff officers and orderlies, galloped wildly down the line, to my great amusement, as the black mare could take care of herself, but some of the more heavy-legged went perilously floundering in mud-holes and soft sands. March 11, 1865 From Grant we got a despatch that he would come up, with some ladies and ge
Friend George G. Meade (search for this): chapter 9
We left Lee, and kept on through the sad remnants of an army that has its place in history. It would have looked a mighty host, if the ghosts of all its soldiers that now sleep between Gettysburg and Lynchburg could have stood there in the lines, beside the living. Burkeville, Va. Headquarters Army of Potomac April 19, 1865 Lt.-Col. Theo. Lyman, A. D. C. Colonel:--In parting with you after an association of over twenty months, during which time you have served on my Staff, I feel it due to you to express my high sense of the assistance I have received from you, and to bear testimony to the zeal, energy, and gallantry you have displayed in the discharge of your duties. Be assured I shall ever preserve the liveliest reminiscences of our intercourse, and wherever our separate fortunes may take us, I shall ever have a deep interest in your welfare and happiness, which, by the blessing of God, I trust may be long continued. Most Truly Your Friend Geo. G. Meade Maj.-Genl. U. S. A.
... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ...