hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Gordon Meade 380 2 Browse Search
Ulysses Simpson Grant 296 0 Browse Search
Theodore Lyman 171 1 Browse Search
Winfield Scott Hancock 160 0 Browse Search
Gouverneur Kemble Warren 158 0 Browse Search
Robert Lee 135 1 Browse Search
Horatio Gouverneur Wright 122 0 Browse Search
Andrew Atkinson Humphreys 112 0 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 107 1 Browse Search
Phil Sheridan 80 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). Search the whole document.

Found 852 total hits in 208 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...
after the fair. Nevertheless, we didn't allow such things to stand in the way, and the races proceeded under the august auspices of General Humphreys, who didn't look exactly like a turfman, and had a mild look of amusement, as he read out: Captain Brady's grey mare. --Captain Brady bows. Captain--, Hey? What is that name? I can't read the writing. Murphy, suggests General Miles. Oh, dear me, of course, yes; Captain Murphy's bay gelding. No! red, suggests Miles. Ah, yes, to be sure — reCaptain Brady bows. Captain--, Hey? What is that name? I can't read the writing. Murphy, suggests General Miles. Oh, dear me, of course, yes; Captain Murphy's bay gelding. No! red, suggests Miles. Ah, yes, to be sure — red. Here, says the long-expectant Murphy. Then a bugler blows at a great rate and the horses are brought to the line; the bugler blows at a great rate some more, and away they go. There were a good many different races, some of which were rather tiresome, by reason of the long waiting and the fact that none of the horses were really racers, but only swift officers' steeds, which were not enough trained to go round regularly, but often would balk at the hurdles and refuse to go round at all. Wh
and small arms. To eke out this short letter I enclose the report of the Court of Enquiry on the Mine. You see it gives fits to Burnside, Ledlie, Ferrero, and Willcox, while the last paragraph, though very obscure, is intended, I fancy, as a small snub on General Meade. March 5, 1865 . . . Well, the rain held up and some blue sky began to show, and I mounted on what I shall have to call my Anne of Cleves — for, in the choice words of that first of gentlemen, Henry VIII, she is a great Flanders mare --and rode forth for a little exercise. Verily I conceived we should rester en route, sich was the mud in one or two places! She would keep going deeper and deeper, and I would strive to pick out a harder path and would by no means succeed. Nevertheless, I made out to find some terra firma, at last, and, by holding to the ridges got a very fair ride after all. I found not much new out there, towards the Jerusalem plank: some cavalry camped about, as usual, and a new railroad branch
Carl Bergmann (search for this): chapter 9
ced by your loving hub. March 10, 1865 What think you we did yesterday? We had a Matinee musicale, at the Chapel of the 50th New York Engineers. Nothing but high-toned amusements, now-a-day, you will perceive. In truth I was very glad to go to it, as good music always gives me pleasure. The band was the noted one of the New Jersey brigade, and consisted of over thirty pieces. But the great feature was Captain Halsted, aide-de-camp to General Wright, in capacity of Max Maretzek, Carl Bergmann, Muzio, or any other musical director you please. It appears that the Captain is a fine musician, and that his ears are straight, though his eyes are not. There was a large assemblage of the fashion and nobility of the environs of Petersburg, though most of the first families of Virginia were unavoidably detained in the city. We had a batch of ladies, who, by the way, seem suddenly to have gone mad on visiting this army. No petticoat is allowed to stay within our lines, but they run u
Horatio Gouverneur Wright (search for this): chapter 9
5th Corps to turn out some troops, and to General Wright, to say we were coming that way, and orderature was Captain Halsted, aide-de-camp to General Wright, in capacity of Max Maretzek, Carl Bergmanctors, I can tell you. Generals Meade, Warren, Wright, Parke, Humphreys, Ord, Gibbon, Ayres, Griffinreat loss; our men never behaved better. Both Wright and Humphreys took several hundred prisoners, ode about with the General, who confabbed with Wright, Warren, and the gay Humphreys. The latter is come. At a quarter past four in the morning, Wright, having massed his three divisions in columns ; etc. P. H. Sheridan. Oh, said Meade, so General Wright wasn't there. Oh, yes! cried the Staff oan who had commanded a battalion, Oh, yes, General Wright was there. Meade turned on his heel withoh heavy loss. A despatch was sent in haste to Wright, to push on to Farmville, cross the river and ittle ahead of this we halted to talk with General Wright. At 10.30 came, one after the other, two [5 more...]
Signor Fra Diavolo (search for this): chapter 9
acles on nose, rushed violently at the entrenched skirmish line of the enemy and captured the same, with the double view of making a reconnaissance and a diversion, and furthermore of showing the Johns that we were not going to be pitched into without hitting back. Then there was a lull, filled by the arrival of a long grey procession of some 1500 prisoners from the 9th Corps. Really these men possess a capacity for looking rough beyond any people I ever saw, except the townsmen of Signor Fra Diavolo. They grew rougher and rougher. These looked brown and athletic, but had the most matted hair, tangled beards, and slouched hats, and the most astounding carpets, horse-sheets and transmogrified shelter-tents for blankets, that you ever imagined. One grim gentleman, of forbidding aspect, had tempered his ferocity by a black, broad-brimmed straw hat, such as country ministers sometimes wear — a head-dress which, as Whittier remarked, rather forced the season! Singularly enough, the
Duncan Archibald Pell (search for this): chapter 9
epeated itself on Grant's face, as he put down the bonbonniere beside the scroll. Then he looked very fixedly at Mr. Washburn and slowly drew a sheet of paper from his pocket. Everyone was hushed, and there then burst forth the following florid eloquence: Sir! I accept the medal. I shall take an early opportunity of writing a proper reply to the President. I shall publish an order, containing these resolutions, to the troops that were under my command before Vicksburg. As he stopped, Major Pell drew a long breath and said: I thought we were sure of a speech this time, but now we never shall get one out of him. The medal was of gold, three pounds in weight; on one side a bad likeness of Grant; on the reverse a goddess, in an impossible position, who, as General Meade remarked, seemed to keep a general furnishing shop of guns and sabres. What is the meaning of the allegory? he enquired of the Lieutenant-General. I don't know, replied Grant, with entire simplicity, I don't know,
Edward Otho Cresap Ord (search for this): chapter 9
the distinguished militaries crowded round to gaze. Major-General Ord, who can't get over his Irish blood, said: I believe, tell you. Generals Meade, Warren, Wright, Parke, Humphreys, Ord, Gibbon, Ayres, Griffin, Rawlins, Ingalls, etc., etc. Very from the river to west of the Jerusalem road; then Wright and Ord, stretching to Hatcher's Run; then Humphreys, forming the le Humphreys' left rested somewhat west of the Boydton plank. Ord and Humphreys were now crowding in their skirmishers, trying for openings in the slashings to put in a column. Ord tried to carry the line, but could not get through; but the 2d divisiquick towards their own right, having abandoned the whole of Ord's front and some of Humphreys'. We were not quite sure whethlooking young man? He was sent the day before yesterday, by Ord, from Burkeville Junction, with a small infantry and cavalry officer speedily, with a note. General Lee stated that General Ord had agreed to a suspension of hostilities, and he should
Mike Walsh (search for this): chapter 9
Mt. Pleasant Church. The bands were playing and the troops were cheering for the fall of Richmond, which, as the jocose Barnard (Captain on Wheaton's Staff) said, Would knock gold, so that it wouldn't be worth more than seventy-five cents on the dollar! Suddenly we heard renewed cheers, while the band played Hail to the Chief. We looked up the road, and, seeing a body of cavalry, supposed the Lieutenant-General was coming. But lo! as they drew nearer, we recognized the features of Colonel Mike Walsh (erst a sergeant of cavalry), who, with an admirable Irish impudence, was acknowledging the shouts of the crowd that mistook him for Grant! Appomattox Court house We continued our ride. This country, from Gravelly Run up, is no longer the flat sand of Petersburg, but like Culpeper, undulating, with quartz and sandstone, and a red soil. About five we halted at Mrs. Jones's, a little east of Deep Creek, and prepared to go supperless to bed on the floor or on the grass, for our wa
John Gibbon (search for this): chapter 9
ntest degree, replied gravely: I don't know but I was. There was a heavy crowd of Hectors, I can tell you. Generals Meade, Warren, Wright, Parke, Humphreys, Ord, Gibbon, Ayres, Griffin, Rawlins, Ingalls, etc., etc. Very few ladies. After this a moderate collation, and so home to bed. March 13, 1865 We have a long telegram frt 7.30 A. M. we all got on the chargers and wended toward the left. The fancy huts of the 2d Corps were all roofless, and their Headquarters were occupied by General Gibbon, of the other side of the river. The 1st division was crossing the Hatcher's Run bridge, as we got to it, the two others being already over. Near Gravelly R the Rebel line, with its huts and its defenders sorely beleagured over there in the inner lines, against which our batteries were even now playing; and presently Gibbon assaults these two outlying redoubts, and takes them after a fierce fight, losing heavily. In one was a Rebel captain, who told his men to surrender to nobody.
Robert Lee (search for this): chapter 9
the South were rapidly vanishing. On March 25, Lee made an energetic but unsuccessful sortie. On t established himself between the two parts. Lee's position was untenable; Richmond and Petersbuan's advance from the south. As a last resort, Lee planned to retreat to the mountains of Virginiagot across the railroad in front of the enemy. Lee was unable to break through. Hemmed in, with hhe Rapid Ann, last May, to behold Grant swallow Lee at a mouthful, and — didn't see it! Two divisick came the officer speedily, with a note. General Lee stated that General Ord had agreed to a susk, and then, if I get no communication from General Lee, I shall attack! So back went Forsyth, witrant to halt the troops. Major Wingate, of General Lee's Staff, was a military-looking man, dressek off his cap and said: Good-morning, General. Lee, however, did not recognize him, and, when he fly replied: You have to answer for most of it! Lee is, as all agree, a stately-looking man; tall, [21 more...]
... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ...