hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Braxton Bragg 454 2 Browse Search
J. C. Pemberton 439 1 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 411 1 Browse Search
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) 348 0 Browse Search
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) 335 5 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 299 3 Browse Search
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) 292 0 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 283 1 Browse Search
J. E. Johnston 226 0 Browse Search
Grant 206 72 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. Search the whole document.

Found 603 total hits in 114 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
rectly on Strasburg, General Jackson took the road by Front Royal, to turn the Federal army. His movement was so prompt as to surprise the enemy completely. Ewell, who was leading, captured most of the troops at Front Royal, and pressed on to Winchester, by the direct road, with his troops, while Jackson, turning across to that from Strasburg, struck the main Federal column in flank, and drove a large part of it back toward Strasburg. The pursuit was pressed to Winchester, but the Federal troWinchester, but the Federal troops continued their flight into Maryland. Two thousand prisoners were taken in this pursuit. After reaching the Chickahominy, General McClellan's troops advanced very slowly. Sumner's, Franklin's, and Porter's corps, were on and above the railroad, and Heintzelman's and Keyes's below it, and on the Williamsburg road. The last two, after crossing the stream, at Bottom's Bridge, on the 22d, were stationary, apparently, for several days, constructing a line of intrenchments two miles in advan
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
command of the Army of Virginia by wounds in battle, my suggestion was adopted. In that way, the largest Confederate army that ever fought, was formed in the month of June, by strengthening the forces near Richmond with troops from North and South Carolina and Georgia. But, while the Confederate Government was forming this great army, the Federal general was, with equal industry, employed in making defensive arrangements; so that in the seven days fighting his intrenchments so covered the operth Carolina, under Major-General Holmes, General Ripley gave me this number. He brought the first brigade--five thousand men. General Lawton told me that his was six thousand, General Drayton that his was seven thousand; there was another brigade, of which I do not know the strength. twenty-two thousand from South Carolina and Georgia, and above sixteen thousand from the Valley in the divisions of Jackson and Ewell, which the victories of Cross Keys and Port Republic had rendered disposable.
Hampton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
, that a large body of United States troops had landed at Eltham's, and nearly opposite to West Point, on the southern shore of York River. Early next morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time General Smith had ascertained that the enemy was occupying a thick wood between the New Kent road and Etham's Landing. The security of our march required that he should be dislodged, and General Smith was intrusted with this service. He performed it very handsomely with Hampton's and Hood's brigades, under Whiting, driving the enemy, in about two hours, a mile and a half through the wood, to the protection of their vessels-of-war. General Smith's two brigades sustained a trifling loss in killed and wounded. If statements published in Northern newspapers are accurate, their loss was ten times as great as ours. The way being thus cleared, the march was resumed. Smith's and Magruder's divisions followed the road by New Kent Court-House, and Longstreet's and H
Seven Pines (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ssee brigade, of Smith's division, within three miles of Seven Pines, and were driven back by it, after a sharp skirmish. Itncountered Federal outposts more than two miles west of Seven Pines, in such strength as indicated the presence of a corps ack, fighting, upon their second line-Couch's division at Seven Pines. R. II. Anderson's brigade, transferred by Longstreet g was then (near five o'clock) decidedly to the right of Seven Pines. It was probably at Casey's intrenched position. Thock, and the firing on the right seemed then to be about Seven Pines. It was evident, therefore, that the battle would not b induced me to postpone the attack. After this battle of Seven Pines-or Fair Oaks, as the Northern people prefer to call it-Gtion of the war has been so little understood as that of Seven Pines; the Southern people have felt no interest in it, becauselman, before the same committee, claimed the victory at Seven Pines, upon no other ground that I can perceive,than the withd
Yorktown (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
nsive preparations. inform War Department of intention to abandon Yorktown. battle of Williamsburg. affair near Eltham. no further interru, and Smith's the reserve. The fieldworks at Gloucester Point and Yorktown, on the left flank, and Mulberry Point, on the right, were occupiesition we had nothing to do but to finish the works begun, between Yorktown and the head of the inundations, and observe the enemy's operationght, and the construction of a long line of batteries in front of Yorktown, and beyond the range of our old-fashioned ship-guns. These battears. A battery on the shore, three miles (pilot's distance) below Yorktown, received the first guns mounted. Shots of the first volley, firemed the War Department of the fact, and of my intention to abandon Yorktown and the Warwick, before the fire of that artillery should be openehe river. About four o'clock P. M., the cavalry rear-guard, on the Yorktown road, was driven in, and rapidly followed by the enemy. Brigadier
Warwick (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
the valuable property it contained as he could. On Saturday, the 3d of May, the army was ordered to fall back, on information that the Federal batteries would be ready for service in a day or two; Longstreet's and Magruder's divisions by the Warwick road, through Williamsburg, and G. W. Smith's and D. H. Hill's by that from Yorktown-the movement to begin at midnight, and the rear-guard, of cavalry, to follow at daybreak. Information of this was sent to Commodore Tatnall, commanding the iroilcox's right, and ordered all to advance. This was done with such regularity and vigor that the Federal troops were driven back, after a spirited contest of several hours, into the open fields in rear, west and southwest of the point where the Warwick road enters this open ground — the southeastern part of that in which Williamsburg stands. The contest was just leaving the wood and entering the open ground when I first saw it. Here Colston's brigade joined the Confederate, and Kearney's divi
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
vision, upon which the weight of the fighting on the right fell. The officers of those troops, who followed the enemy over all the ground on which they fought, and saw the dead and wounded of both parties on the field, were confident that the Federal loss was more than three times as great as ours. It was published in Northern papers as from ten to twelve thousand. General Smith reported a loss of twelve hundred and thirty-three in his division, including Brigadier-General Hatton, of Tennessee, killed; and General Sumner's was twelve hundred and twenty-three, according to General McClellan's report. Three hundred and fifty prisoners, See General D. H. Hill's report. ten pieces of artillery, six thousand seven hundred muskets and rifles in excellent condition, a garrison-flag and four regimental colors, medical, commissary, quartermaster's and ordnance stores, tents, and sutlers' property, were captured and secured. Tie troops in position to renew the battle on Sunday w
Eltham (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Chapter 5 Take command on the Peninsula. General Magruder's defensive preparations. inform War Department of intention to abandon Yorktown. battle of Williamsburg. affair near Eltham. no further interruption to the march. army withdrawn across the Chickahominy. disposition of the Confederate forces in Virginia at this time. advance of General McClellan. reported movement of McDowell. battle of seven Pines. I assumed my new command on the 17th. The arrival of Smith's andiment of cavalry, reported a Federal fleet of vessels-of-war and transports, passing up toward West Point. In the evening Major-General Smith sent me intelligence, to the Burnt Ordinary, that a large body of United States troops had landed at Eltham's, and nearly opposite to West Point, on the southern shore of York River. Early next morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time General Smith had ascertained that the enemy was occupying a thick wood between the New
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
e Federal army, near Strasburg, and asked instructions. These were given at once, and were to advance and attack, unless he found the enemy too strongly intrenched. Instead of moving directly on Strasburg, General Jackson took the road by Front Royal, to turn the Federal army. His movement was so prompt as to surprise the enemy completely. Ewell, who was leading, captured most of the troops at Front Royal, and pressed on to Winchester, by the direct road, with his troops, while Jackson, Front Royal, and pressed on to Winchester, by the direct road, with his troops, while Jackson, turning across to that from Strasburg, struck the main Federal column in flank, and drove a large part of it back toward Strasburg. The pursuit was pressed to Winchester, but the Federal troops continued their flight into Maryland. Two thousand prisoners were taken in this pursuit. After reaching the Chickahominy, General McClellan's troops advanced very slowly. Sumner's, Franklin's, and Porter's corps, were on and above the railroad, and Heintzelman's and Keyes's below it, and on the Wil
Barhamsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
rigadier-General D. R. Jones in consequence of the illness of the major-general, passed the night of the 5th at Diascund Bridge; that of Major-General Smith at Barhamsville, twelve miles from New Kent Court-House; those of Longstreet and D. H. Hill, with the cavalry, at Williamsburg, as has been said. In Federal dispatches of tates troops had landed at Eltham's, and nearly opposite to West Point, on the southern shore of York River. Early next morning the army was concentrated near Barhamsville. In the mean time General Smith had ascertained that the enemy was occupying a thick wood between the New Kent road and Etham's Landing. The security of our t Court-House, and Longstreet's and Hill's that by the Long Bridges. In these marches the right column reached the Baltimore Cross-roads, nineteen miles from Barhamsville, and the left the Long Bridges. The army remained five days in this position, in line facing to the east, Longstreet's right covering the Long Bridges, and Ma
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...