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Headquarters (Washington, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
Doc. 104.-the fight at Blackburn's Ford, Va. July 18, 1861. Report of Gen. Tyler. Headquarters, 1ST Division, Department N. E. Virginia, Washington, July 27, 1861. Gen. McDowell, Commanding Department:-- sir: On the 18th inst. you ordered me to take my division, with two 20-pound rifled guns, and move against Centreville, to carry that position. My division moved from its encampment at 7 A. M. At 9 A. M. Richardson's brigade reached Centreville, and found that the enemy had retreanfantry, Col. McConnell commanding.--1 private wounded. total.--19 killed, 38 wounded, and 26 missing; 4 horses killed and 11 wounded. J. B. Richardson, Col. Commanding Fourth Brigade, First Division. Beauregard's official report. Headquarters, 1ST corps army of the Potomac, Manassas, August, 1861. General: With the general results of the engagement between several brigades of my command and a considerable force of the enemy, in the vicinity of Mitchell's and Blackburn's Fords of
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
special target of the enemy's rifle guns, notwithstanding it was surmounted by the usual yellow hospital flag, but which, however, I hope, for the sake of past associations, was ignorantly mistaken for a Confederate flag. The name of each individual medical officer I cannot mention. On the day of the engagement, I was attended by my personal staff, Lieutenant S. W. Ferguson, A. D.C., and my volunteer aides-de-camp, Colonels Preston, Manning, Chestnut, Miles, Chisholm, and Heyward, of South Carolina, to all of whom I am greatly indebted for manifold essential services in the transmission of orders on the field, and in the preliminary arrangements for occupation and maintenance of the line of Bull Run. Col. Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. C. N. Smith, Assistant Adjutant-General; Col. S. Jones, Chief of Artillery and Ordnance; Major Cabell, Chief Quarter-master; Capt. W. H. Fowle, Chief of Subsistence Department; Surgeon Thos. H. Williams, Medical Director, and Ass
Fairfax, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
disrespectful word even had been uttered in Centreville, by a single Federal soldier, nor had any one there been robbed to the value of a penny by them. The effect of their capital behavior there has been most happy, indeed, making up for it at Fairfax and Germantown. I proceeded as soon as possible on towards the direction of the firing, and 2 1/2 miles out of Centreville saw on the crest of a ridge scattered soldiers and civilians evidently watching the battle in progress at or near its wmovement was, as it had been the previous day, one of magnitude and force. Under this impression, we passed through Centreville, (where, by the way, we learned that five or six thousand rebel troops, with artillery and cavalry, had marched from Fairfax toward Manassas the night before, and there we might have intercepted them had we advanced instead of halting for the night between Germantown and Centreville, and thus prevented their joining the rebel force at Bull Run, or elsewhere,) and made
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
er. The rest made good time in leaving a position which it could not be expected for a moment that they could hold, The Michigan regiments, on the right, kept their position for a time, but soon drew off with the rest. It was clear that the rebelg-house, it also opened fire, and blazed vigorously until the arrival of the infantry brigade, under Col. Richardson, of Michigan. But after the first four guns no sound of response came from the enemy. Their intention probably was, since they founs, ran swiftly in among them, crying, Now, then, who are you? It turned out that he guessed rightly, and that they were Michigan men, who were misled by the gray Massachusetts uniforms. Following on, and mounting a higher eminence than they had befgiving a command to bayonet the wounded. It must have been at this time that the order to retire was issued. The two Michigan regiments were fresh, and had had no share in the fight; the Massachusetts regiment at the right, under a heavy fire, wa
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
he ran forward, shouting, Who are you? The answer came, Who are you? to which he answered, Massachusetts men. The enemy then cheered violently, and sent a volley, by which the lieutenant was killeed out that he guessed rightly, and that they were Michigan men, who were misled by the gray Massachusetts uniforms. Following on, and mounting a higher eminence than they had before encountered, oumoreover, if the details of the attack were all as regularly ordained as they should be. The Massachusetts 1st was sent to the right, and remained there. The New York 12th was sent to the left, and at any attempt was made to supply their place by better men. And from first to last, the two Massachusetts companies, which entered the woods early, were left for half an hour without reinforcement, ously up the hill, at the brow of which they formed once more. A few minutes later, the two Massachusetts companies, under Lieut.-Col. Wells, withdrew from the wood, and moved to rejoin their regime
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
ness throughout the whole affair. I met a son of Gen. Leavenworth coming off the field, a lad of seventeen, who had stayed in the wood to bathe his feet, after the Twelfth, to which he belonged, was driven out, and who says he was surprised to find he was not half as much scared as he had expected to be. While on the sidehill, being half famished with thirst, I asked a swallow from the canteen of a portly gentleman who was passing. He gave it to me, and I found it was Hon. Mr. Lovejoy, of Illinois. There were half-a-dozen private gentlemen present as spectators. The criticism which will be made on this mishap will be that men should not have been thus thrust upon a masked battery — that it is a repetition of the old Big Bethel and Vienna affairs. Gen. Tyler, however, says that it was only a reconnoissance in force — that the object he had in view was to determine what force and batteries the enemy had at that point — and that he now understands this perfectly. Undoubtedly, this<
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
an engagement was evidently in progress before the enemy's intrenchments at Bull Run, half way from that village to Manassas Junction. I learned that the enemy had evacuated his slight Centreville works as early as 1 A. M. this morning. They wer charge. It was then clear that in a short time he would probably be forced to fall back through the woods towards Manassas Junction. I may mention that, after every volley fired by the enemy while I was at Bull Run, his men uttered a shout that Just before his second battery opened fire, clouds of dust in his rear betokened that he was being reinforced from Manassas Junction. New York times narrative. Centreville, Va., Thursday evening, July 18, 1861. This has been an eventfulthe most of them as far back as Centreville, four miles from Bull Run, which is itself about the same distance from Manassas Junction. The attack will unquestionably be renewed in the morning, not only upon this masked battery, but upon the entire
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 114
vy odds. Accordingly, on the morning of the 17th ult., when the enemy appeared before that position, they were checked and held at bay, with some confessed loss, in a skirmish in advance of the works, in which Major Morgan and Capt. Shelly, Fifth regiment Alabama volunteers, acted with intelligent gallantry; and the post was only abandoned under general but specific imperative orders, in conformity with a long-conceived, established plan of action and battle. Capt. E. P. Alexander, Confederate States engineer, fortunately joined my Headquarters in time to introduce the system of new field-signals which, under his skilful management, rendered me the most important service preceding and during the engagement. The medical officers serving with the regiments engaged were at their proper posts and discharged their duties with satisfactory skill and zeal; and, on one occasion at least, under an annoying fire, when Surgeon Cullen, First regiment Virginia volunteers, was obliged to remo
Vienna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
Carolina, and one piece of Kemper's battery, were thrown across Mitchell's Ford to the ridge which Kemper had occupied that morning. Two solid shot, and three spherical case thrown among them — with a precision inaugurated by that artillerist at Vienna — effected their discomfiture and disappearance, and our troops in the quarters were again withdrawn within our lines, having discharged the duty assigned. At the close of the engagement before Blackburn Ford, I directed Gen. Longstreet to witnois. There were half-a-dozen private gentlemen present as spectators. The criticism which will be made on this mishap will be that men should not have been thus thrust upon a masked battery — that it is a repetition of the old Big Bethel and Vienna affairs. Gen. Tyler, however, says that it was only a reconnoissance in force — that the object he had in view was to determine what force and batteries the enemy had at that point — and that he now understands this perfectly. Undoubtedly, t
Winchester, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
distant between Centreville and Manassas, some six miles apart. On the morning of the 18th, finding that the enemy was assuming a threatening attitude, in addition to the regiments, whose positions have been already stated, I ordered up from Camp Pickens, as a reserve, in rear of Bonham's brigade, the effective men of 6 companies of Kelley's Eighth regiment Louisiana volunteers, and Kirkland's Eleventh regiment North Carolina volunteers, which, having arrived the night before en route for Winchester, I had halted in view of the existing necessities of the service. Subsequently the latter was placed in position to the left of Bonham's brigade. Appearing in heavy force in front of Bonham's position, the enemy, about meridian, opened fire, with several 20-pounder rifle guns from a hill, over one and a half miles from Bull Run. At the same time Kemper, supported by two companies of light infantry, occupied a ridge on the left of the Centreville road, about six hundred yards in advanc
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