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Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 165
annot, while this oath remains. When we look away to that scene of carnage, all strewed with the bodies of patriotic men who courted death for themselves that their country might live, and then look upon the homes which their fall has rendered desolate forever, we realize — what I think the popular heart in its forbearance has never completely comprehended — the unspeakable and hellish atrocity of this rebellion. It is a perfect saturnalia of demoniac passion. From the reddened waters of Bull Run, and from the gory field of Manassas, there is now going up an appeal to God and to millions of exasperated men against those fiends in human shape, who, drunken with the orgies of an infernal ambition, are filling to its brim the cup of a nation's sorrows. Woe, woe, I say, to these traitors when this appeal shall be answered! I must offer you my sincere congratulations on the leadership of that true patriot and soldier, around whose standard you have gathered. When others hesitated, h
Kentucky (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 165
e complete assurance that you will ere long have not only the moral but the material support of Kentucky. Not many weeks can elapse before this powerful Commonwealth will make an exultant avowal of hhe grandest inspirations of patriotism, ever uttered nobler sentiments than these. Indiana and Kentucky, it is true, are separated by a broad river, but in their history it has proved only a thread o, will not be divided. For myself, I must be pardoned for saying, that next to our own beloved Kentucky, my bosom most overflows toward the noble State under whose hospitable shelter we have met to-d world, were carefully packing themselves away to keep in the ices of neutrality. I honor him, Kentucky will honor him, the nation will honor him. When you move, as soon you may, to the seat of war, Kentucky, despite the whispered caution of politicians, will cheer you on, and will hang with prayerful solicitude over you, alike upon your march and amid the heady currents of battle. Loyal men
Napoleon (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 165
t a battle, but it has not lost its honor, nor its courage, nor its hopes, nor its resolution to conquer. One of those chances to which the fortunes of war are ever subject, and against which the most consummate generalship cannot at all times provide, has given a momentary advantage to the forces of the rebellion. Grouchy did not pursue the column of Bulow, and thus Waterloo was won for Wellington at the very moment that victory,with her laurelled wreath, seemed stooping over the head of Napoleon. So Patterson did not pursue Johnston, and the overwhelming concentration of rebel troops that in consequence ensued was probably the true cause why the army of the United States was driven back, excellent as was its discipline, and self-sacrificing as had been its feats of valor. Panics, from slight and seemingly insignificant causes, have occurred in the best drilled and bravest of armies, and they prove neither the want of discipline nor of courage on the part of the soldiers. This ch
Waterloo, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 165
nothing shaken by the recent sad reverse of arms whose shadow is still resting upon our spirits. The country has indeed lost a battle, but it has not lost its honor, nor its courage, nor its hopes, nor its resolution to conquer. One of those chances to which the fortunes of war are ever subject, and against which the most consummate generalship cannot at all times provide, has given a momentary advantage to the forces of the rebellion. Grouchy did not pursue the column of Bulow, and thus Waterloo was won for Wellington at the very moment that victory,with her laurelled wreath, seemed stooping over the head of Napoleon. So Patterson did not pursue Johnston, and the overwhelming concentration of rebel troops that in consequence ensued was probably the true cause why the army of the United States was driven back, excellent as was its discipline, and self-sacrificing as had been its feats of valor. Panics, from slight and seemingly insignificant causes, have occurred in the best drill
Bunker Hill (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 165
d beneficent Republic whose children you are. Any irregularity on your part would sadden the land that loves you; any faltering in the presence of the foe would cover it with immeasurable humiliation. You will soon mingle in the ranks with the gallant volunteers from the North and the West, and with me you will admire their moderation, their admirable discipline, and that deep determination, whose earnestness with them has no language of menace, or bluster, or passion. When the men from Bunker Hill and the men from the dark and bloody ground, unestranged from each other by the low arts of politicians, shall stand side by side on the same national battle-field, the heart of freedom will be glad. Carry with you the complete assurance that you will ere long have not only the moral but the material support of Kentucky. Not many weeks can elapse before this powerful Commonwealth will make an exultant avowal of her loyalty, and will stand erect before the country, stainless and true a
Lucknow (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): chapter 165
ht of. You are not about to invade the territory of a foreign enemy, nor is your purpose that of conquest or spoliation. Should you occupy the South, you will do so as friends and protectors, and your aim will be not to subjugate that betrayed and distracted country, but to deliver it from the remorseless military despotism by which it is trodden down. Union men, who are your brethren, throng in those States, and will listen for the coming footsteps of your army, as the Scottish maiden of Lucknow listened for the airs of her native measure land. It is true, that amid the terrors and darkness which prevail there, they are silenced and are now unseen, but be assured that by the light of the stars you carry upon your banner you will find them all. It has been constantly asserted by the conspirators throughout the South that this is a war of subjugation on the part of the Government of the United States, waged for the extermination of Southern institutions, and by vandals and miscreant
Calvary (Israel) (search for this): chapter 165
ountry, remember that since the sword flamed over the portals of Paradise until now, it has been drawn in no holier cause than that in which you are engaged. Remember, too, the millions whose hearts are breaking under the anguish of this terrible crime, and then strike boldly, strike in the power of truth and duty, strike with a bound and a shout, well assured that your blows will fall upon ingrates, and traitors, and parricides, whose lust for power would make of this bright land one vast Golgotha, rather than be balked of their guilty aims — and may the God of your fathers give you the victory. I should have rejoiced to have met you within the limits of yonder proud Commonwealth from whence you came, and whose name you bear, but wise and patriotic men, whose motives I respect while dissenting from their conclusions, have willed it should be otherwise. Here, however, you are in the midst of friends, and have doubtless received a brother's welcome on the soil of a State which is n
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 165
Doc. 146.-speech of Joseph Holt, to the Kentucky troops under Gen. Rousseau, at camp Jo Holt, in Indiana, delivered July 31, 1861. Fellow-Citizens and Soldiers:--I say citizens, since you still are such, and it is only because you have resolved that no earthly power shall rob you of this proud title, or in any manner curtail can only be enjoyed amidst the ruins of our country. No Spartan hero, under the grandest inspirations of patriotism, ever uttered nobler sentiments than these. Indiana and Kentucky, it is true, are separated by a broad river, but in their history it has proved only a thread of light and beauty, across which their hands and theiron my father's farm upon the banks of yonder river, and in the light of the morning and of the evening sun my eyes rested upon the free homes and grand forests of Indiana. I played upon her hills, and fished in her streams, and mingled with her people, when I was too young to know, what I trust I shall never be old enough to learn
mountains, that unbraces the fetters which man would rivet upon the spirit of his fellow-man. It was at the handles of the plough and amid the breathing odors of its newly-opened furrows that the character of Cincinnatus was formed, expanded, and matured. It was not in the city full, but in the deep gorges and upon the snow-clad summits of the Alps, amid the eagles and the thunders, that William Tell laid the foundations of those altars to human liberty, against which the surging tides of European despotism have beaten for centuries, but, thank God, have beaten in vain. It was amid the primeval forests and mountains, the lakes and leaping streams of our own land; amid fields of waving grain; amid the songs of the reaper and the tinkling of the shepherd's bell that were nurtured those rare virtues which clustered star-like in the character of Washington, and lifted him in moral stature a head and shoulders above even the demi-gods of ancient story. There is one most striking and d
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 165
, but be assured that by the light of the stars you carry upon your banner you will find them all. It has been constantly asserted by the conspirators throughout the South that this is a war of subjugation on the part of the Government of the United States, waged for the extermination of Southern institutions, and by vandals and miscreants, who, in the fury of their passions, spare neither age, nor sex, nor property. Even one of the Confederate generals has so far steeped himself in infamy as exclaimed, From yonder summits forty centuries look down upon you. The thought was sublime and electric; but you have even more than this. When you shall confront those infuriated hosts, whose battle-cry is, Down with the Government of the United States, let your answering shout be, The Government as our fathers made it; and when you strike, remember that not only do the good and the great of the past look down upon you from heights infinitely above those of Egyptian pyramids, but that uncou
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