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Saline County (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 197
imes vigilant and attentive to his duties, and fearless upon the field of battle. Your Excellency will perceive that our State forces consisted of only 5,221 officers and men; that of these no less than 156 died upon the field, while 517 were wounded. These facts attest more powerfully than any words can, the severity of the conflict, and the dauntless courage of our brave soldiers. It is also my painful duty to announce the death of one of my aids, Lieut.-Col. George W. Allen, of Saline County. He was shot down while communicating an order, and we left him buried on the field. I have appointed to the position thus sadly vacated, Capt. James T. Cearnal, in recognition of his gallant conduct and valuable services throughout the battle as a volunteer aid. Another of my staff, Col. Horace H. Brand, was made prisoner by the enemy, but has since been released. My thanks are due to three of your staff--Col. Wm. M. Cook, Col. Richard Gaines, and Col. Thos. L. Snead, for the servi
division suffered severely. He himself fell dangerously wounded at the head of his column. Of his regiment of infantry, under Col. John T. Hughes, consisting of about 650 men, 36 were killed, 76 wounded, many of them mortally, and 30 are missing. Among the killed were C. H. Bennet, adjutant of the regiment, Capt. Blackwell, and Lieut. Hughes. Col. Rives' squadron of cavalry, (dismounted,) numbering some 234 men, lost 4 killed and 8 wounded. Among the former were Lieut.-Col. Austin and Capt. Engart. Brig.-Gen. Clark was also wounded. His infantry (200 men) lost, in killed, 17, and wounded, 71. Col. Burbridge was severely wounded. Capts. Farris and Halleck, and Lieut. Haskins, were killed. Gen. Clark's cavalry, together with the Windsor Guards, were under the command of Lieut.-Col. Major, who did good service. They lost 6 killed and 5 wounded. Brig.-Gen. McBride's division (605 men) lost 22 killed, 67 severely wounded, and 57 slightly wounded. Col. Foster and Capts. Nicho
Charles Griffin (search for this): chapter 197
61. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my battalion, at the battle near Springfield, Mo., on the 10th instant. The battalion was composed of companies B and E, Second Infantry, commanded by First Sergeants Griffin and G. H. McLaughlin, a company of general service recruits, commanded by First Lieutenant W. L. Lothrop, Fourth Artillery, and a company of mounted rifle recruits, commanded by Lance Sergeant Morine. During the early part of the action, Fourth Artillery, and George H. McLaughlin received the highest commendations of all the officers present. I also mention the First Sergeant of Captain Gilbert's company, Mandrazz, who was killed in the last assault of the enemy; also First Sergeant Griffin, commanding Company B, Second Infantry, and Lance Sergeant Morine, commanding the company of Mounted Rifle recruits, each of whom behaved with distinguished gallantry. Sergeant Morine was mortally wounded, and died on the field. Durin
y assistant aids, succeeded in gathering up some 300 mounted men, who, under his command, attacked the forces in our rear, commanded by Gen. Siegel, capturing 157 prisoners, and killing 64 men; the balance of his forces, under the command of Lieut.-Col. Hyde and Major A. H. Chalmers, succeeded in reaching the line of battle in time to form upon the right of Gen. Slack, where they rendered most prompt and efficient service. For full particulars of the operations of this battalion, I refer you toent, and who ably and gallantly led his forces, continuously exposed to the greatest peril, but providentially escaped with a slight wound to himself and horse. I desire, also, to bring before your favorable notice Lieut.-Cols. James P. Major and Hyde, and Major A. H. Chalmers, who, at the head of their respective forces, rendered valuable service under many disadvantages. I desire, especially, to bring to your notice J. P. Orr, of Paris, Mo., who bore our standard through the heat of the conf
Robert Walker (search for this): chapter 197
e line of battle in time to form upon the right of Gen. Slack, where they rendered most prompt and efficient service. For full particulars of the operations of this battalion, I refer you to the report of Lieut.-Col. Major. In the several engagements referred to, I regret the necessity of enumerating so large a list of killed and wounded, hereinafter stated. Before closing this report of the sanguinary battle of the 10th, I beg leave to make my acknowledgments to my staff; also Cols. Robert Walker and Woodson, my assistant aids; especially do I desire to bring before your particular notice the gallant and intrepid manner in which my orders were conveyed by Lieut.Cols. Wm. O. Burton and Samuel Farmington, the former of whom had two, and the latter one horse shot under them, while delivering orders. Throughout the entire engagement, these officers were distinguished for their bravery and dauntless valor. I desire, also, to make my acknowledgments to Col. J. Q. Burbridge, who
n time to form upon the right of Gen. Slack, where they rendered most prompt and efficient service. For full particulars of the operations of this battalion, I refer you to the report of Lieut.-Col. Major. In the several engagements referred to, I regret the necessity of enumerating so large a list of killed and wounded, hereinafter stated. Before closing this report of the sanguinary battle of the 10th, I beg leave to make my acknowledgments to my staff; also Cols. Robert Walker and Woodson, my assistant aids; especially do I desire to bring before your particular notice the gallant and intrepid manner in which my orders were conveyed by Lieut.Cols. Wm. O. Burton and Samuel Farmington, the former of whom had two, and the latter one horse shot under them, while delivering orders. Throughout the entire engagement, these officers were distinguished for their bravery and dauntless valor. I desire, also, to make my acknowledgments to Col. J. Q. Burbridge, who was severely wound
William O. Burton (search for this): chapter 197
to the report of Lieut.-Col. Major. In the several engagements referred to, I regret the necessity of enumerating so large a list of killed and wounded, hereinafter stated. Before closing this report of the sanguinary battle of the 10th, I beg leave to make my acknowledgments to my staff; also Cols. Robert Walker and Woodson, my assistant aids; especially do I desire to bring before your particular notice the gallant and intrepid manner in which my orders were conveyed by Lieut.Cols. Wm. O. Burton and Samuel Farmington, the former of whom had two, and the latter one horse shot under them, while delivering orders. Throughout the entire engagement, these officers were distinguished for their bravery and dauntless valor. I desire, also, to make my acknowledgments to Col. J. Q. Burbridge, who was severely wounded while gallantly urging forward his men. I desire, also, to commend to your favorable notice Major John B. Clark, upon whom was devolved the command of the regiment in
nger which threatened them. The battle-field viewed by your correspondent, where the most severe fighting was done, was along the ridges and hills on either side (mostly on the west) of the stream for the first mile mentioned above, where the creek runs in a southerly direction. As we crossed the hill on the north, moving in a southwesterly direction, Captain Wright, with the mounted Home Guards, was sent to the east side so as to cut off a party of rebels seen in that direction. Adjutant Hascock, with a glass, rode to the brow of the hill, where, looking down, he could see every movement of the enemy beneath him. His appearance in full view caused a great hubbub in the rebel camp, which had already been thoroughly aroused by our appearance, and camps and baggage were hastily loaded and moved toward the south. We had completely surprised them. The evidence of that fact was everywhere visible; but they had got quickly into line of battle — their clouds of cavalry were visible,
r some skirmishing in front of our line, the firing in the direction of the northwest, which was during an hour's time roaring in succession, had almost entirely ceased. I thereupon presumed that the attack of Gen. Lyon had been successful, and that his troops were in pursuit of the enemy, who moved in large numbers toward the south along the ridge of a hill about 700 yards opposite our right. This was the state of affairs at 8 1/2 o'clock in the morning, when it was reported to me by Dr. Melchior and some of our skirmishers, that Lyon's men were coming up the road. Lieut. Albert, of the Third, and Col. Salomon, of the Fifth, notified their regiments not to fire on troops coming in this direction, whilst I cautioned the artillery in the same manner. Our troops in this moment expected with anxiety the approach of our friends, and were waving the flag, raised as a signal to their comrades, when at once two batteries opened their fire against us--one in front, placed on the Fayettev
he enemy's skirmishers. Major Osterhaus' battalion was at once deployed to the right, and two companies of the First Missouri Volunteers, under Capts. Yates and Cavender, were deployed to the left, all as skirmishers. The firing now became very severe, and it was evident we were approaching the enemy's stronghold, where they intfell to rise no more; while Colonel Andrews had his horse shot from under him, and was wounded himself slightly. General Lyon suffered in a similar manner. Captains Cavender, Cole, and Yates, each slightly, or at least not dangerously wounded; Lieutenants Brown and Johnson, and Corporals Conant and Rogers, more or less severely wmany daring acts and valorous deeds were performed, it were almost impossible to single any one as worthy of especial notice. Among the latter, however, were Capts. Cavender and Miller, members of the ex-Legislature, Capt. Granger of the regulars, Major Porter of Iowa, Major Cloud of Kansas, Capt. Wood of the Kansas cavalry, and C
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