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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
inia, we are told, seceded, because the President, under such circumstances, called volunteers to the defence of the country. I need not remark to you, gentlemen, how fatal the attempted disseverance of the Union must prove to all our material interests. Secession, and annexation to the South, would cut off every outlet for our productions. We cannot get them to the Confederate States across the Alleghanies. The Ohio River and the country beyond it, would be closed to our trade. With Maryland in the Union, our outlet to the East would be interrupted; while we could not carry products across the Pennsylvania line, by the Monongahela or other routes. In time of war, we would encounter a hostile force, and in time of peace, a custom-house at every turn. The interests of the people of Virginia were intrusted to the Richmond Convention. How have they fulfilled that trust? Why, if war was to come, was our land made the battle-field? Why was this Commonwealth interposed as a bar
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
he attempted disseverance of the Union must prove to all our material interests. Secession, and annexation to the South, would cut off every outlet for our productions. We cannot get them to the Confederate States across the Alleghanies. The Ohio River and the country beyond it, would be closed to our trade. With Maryland in the Union, our outlet to the East would be interrupted; while we could not carry products across the Pennsylvania line, by the Monongahela or other routes. In time of w Congress can announce to the people of the Gulf States, that they need now have no apprehension; they might go on with their planting and business as usual; the war would not come to their section; its theatre would be along the borders of the Ohio River, and in Virginia. Have we done wrong in rejecting the authority of the men who have thus betrayed the interests confided to their charge? Under these circumstances the people of the State who desired to preserve a Virginia in the Union, b
Washington (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ril, the Secretary of War of the Confederate States, publicly announced that war was commenced, and that the Capitol at Washington would be captured before the first of May. The intention to capture the Capital of the Union was repeatedly proclaimedse communications. I also send you herewith a copy of a communication received from the Secretary of the Interior at Washington, certifying officially the apportionment of Representatives in the Thirty-eighth Congress under the census of 1860. Vie. I have the honor to be, with great respect, Your obedient servant, F. H. Pierpont, Governor. war Department, Washington, June 25, 1861. sir:--In reply to your application of the 21st instant, for the aid of the Federal Government to repretary of War. Hon. Francis H. Pierpont, Governor, Commonwealth of Virginia, Wheeling, Va. Department of the Interior, Washington. To His Excellency, Francis H. Pierpont, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia: I, Caleb B. Smith, Secretary of t
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
to your application of the 21st instant, for the aid of the Federal Government to repel from Virginia the lawless invaders now perpetrating every species of outrage upon persons and property, throughout a large portion of the State, the President directs me to say that a large additional force will soon be sent to your relief. The full extent of the conspiracy against popular rights, which has culminated in the atrocities to which you refer, was not known when its outbreak took place at Charleston. It now appears that it was matured for many years by secret organizations throughout the country, especially in the slave States. By this means, when the President called upon Virginia, in April, for its quota of troops then deemed necessary to put it down in the States in which it had shown itself in arms, the call was responded to by an order from the chief confederate in Virginia to his earned followers, to seize the navy yard at Gosport; and the authorities of the State, who had til
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
ield the Capital and retire in disgrace, without adopting any measures of defence? Yet Virginia, we are told, seceded, because the President, under such circumstances, called volunteers to the defence of the country. I need not remark to you, gentlemen, how fatal the attempted disseverance of the Union must prove to all our material interests. Secession, and annexation to the South, would cut off every outlet for our productions. We cannot get them to the Confederate States across the Alleghanies. The Ohio River and the country beyond it, would be closed to our trade. With Maryland in the Union, our outlet to the East would be interrupted; while we could not carry products across the Pennsylvania line, by the Monongahela or other routes. In time of war, we would encounter a hostile force, and in time of peace, a custom-house at every turn. The interests of the people of Virginia were intrusted to the Richmond Convention. How have they fulfilled that trust? Why, if war wa
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
he State who desired to preserve a Virginia in the Union, by their delegates appointed at primary meetings, assembled at Wheeling on the 13th of May last, to consider the measures necessary to protect their constitutional rights and liberties, their charge of their duties, took an oath to support the Constitution of the United States. When the Convention assembled at Wheeling on the 11th of June, they found the late Governor, and many of the other officers of the State, engaged in an attempt toF. H. Pierpont. Documents accompanying the Governors; message. Commonwealth of Virginia, Executive Department, Wheeling, June 21, 1861. To His Excellency the President of the United States: sir:--Reliable information has been received atour obedient servant, Simon Cameron, Secretary of War. Hon. Francis H. Pierpont, Governor, Commonwealth of Virginia, Wheeling, Va. Department of the Interior, Washington. To His Excellency, Francis H. Pierpont, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virg
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 29
State to the Southern league, called the Confederate States; and to render the step irretrievable, ath of April, the Secretary of War of the Confederate States, publicly announced that war was commenced States was adopted by the people of the United States; and the powers thus derived, could be resere, citizens of Virginia, citizens of the United States, recognizing and obeying the Constitution tion of the State. The President of the United States has issued his proclamation convening an eave renounced the title of citizens of the United States, claiming to be citizens of a foreign and e under the rebellious government of the Confederate States. I recommend, therefore, the election o61. To His Excellency the President of the United States: sir:--Reliable information has been reonwealth, to call on the Government of the United States for aid to repress such rebellion and violf the seventh and subsequent census of the United States, and to fix the number of the members of t[5 more...]
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
over a large portion of the State, to compel an appearance of unanimity in favor of secession, show that the leaders of this movement felt that the hearts of the people were not with them. The proclamation of the President calling for seventy-five thousand volunteer troops, is commonly relied upon to justify the ordinance of secession. That proclamation was issued on the 15th of April, 1861. It must not, however, be overlooked that on the 6th of March, 1861, the pretended Congress at Montgomery, provided by law for calling into the field a force of one hundred thousand volunteers; and that on the 12th of April, the Secretary of War of the Confederate States, publicly announced that war was commenced, and that the Capitol at Washington would be captured before the first of May. The intention to capture the Capital of the Union was repeatedly proclaimed in influential papers at Richmond and other Southern cities, before the 15th of April. It was, in fact, long a cherished object
Gosport (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
as not known when its outbreak took place at Charleston. It now appears that it was matured for many years by secret organizations throughout the country, especially in the slave States. By this means, when the President called upon Virginia, in April, for its quota of troops then deemed necessary to put it down in the States in which it had shown itself in arms, the call was responded to by an order from the chief confederate in Virginia to his earned followers, to seize the navy yard at Gosport; and the authorities of the State, who had till then shown repugnance to the plot, found themselves stripped of all actual power, and afterwards were manifestly permitted to retain the empty forms of office only because they consented to use then at the bidding of the invaders. The President, however, never supposed that a brave and free people, though surprised and unarmed, could long be subjugated by a class of political adventurers always adverse to them; and the fact that they have a
Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 29
n convening an extra session of Congress, to meet at the National Capital on the fourth of this month. The two Senators from this State have vacated their offices. It is known to me that they are engaged in the conspiracy to overturn the Government of the United States, and in rebellion to its lawful authority. They have renounced the title of citizens of the United States, claiming to be citizens of a foreign and hostile State. They have abandoned the posts assigned to them by the State of Virginia in the Senate of the United States, to take office under the rebellious government of the Confederate States. I recommend, therefore, the election of Senators to fill the vacancies which have thus occurred. I beg leave to call your attention to the subject of the Circuit Courts. Those Circuits as now prescribed by law are too large to enable the Judges to efficiently perform the duties incumbent on them. In investigating this subject, you may find it not only necessary to reduce
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