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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Doc. 56.-the Bridge burning. Letter of Gov. Hicks in reply to Mayor Brown. To the People of Maryland: I have heretofore asked a suspension of your judgment in regard to a communication, with accompanying certificates, from the Mayor of Baltimore to the House of Delegates of Maryland, in which is asserted a complicity on my part in the unlawful destruction of the bridges on the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore, and the Northern Central Railroads, on the night of the 19th of April. A desire to obtain expected information from the telegraphic despatches recently seized by the Government — but which I have not yet received — added to the pressing nature of my official duties, has prevented me from making this publication at an earlier period. The Mayor says: About 12 o'clock P. M., the Hon. E. Louis Lowe and Marshal George P. Kane called at my house, where Gov. Hicks was passing the night, and Marshal Kane informed me that a despatch had been received tha
es and a half from the city. The watchman at the bridge, whom I saw to-day, states positively that when they arrived at the bridge, and penned him in his shanty, it was about ten minutes past one o'clock; and that after cutting the telegraph wires, which took but a few minutes, they fired the bridges at about twenty or twenty-five minutes after one o'clock. As to who the party were, I cannot say; but a gentleman at Cockeysville said that a man named Philip Fendall (I think of the firm of Duvall, Keighler & Co.) was one of the party, but I am not prepared to say so positively. He is a cousin to the wife of John Merryman, now under arrest. Any thing further that I can do for you, I will do with great pleasure. Please excuse this hurried account of the affair, as Mr. Bryson is waiting. Your obedient servant, John H. Longnecker. I have not the slightest doubt that the destruction of the bridges referred to was an important part of the secession programme. The necessity of
can use this statement as you think best. I could make it more full if you wish it. I could allude to the liability of every one in Baltimore, on the 19th, confused by the excitement, to be mistaken. Indeed I remember an instance of this. General Egerton was ordered by you to drive back the mob who were pressing upon the Pennsylvania troops. He drove back the troops. I heard you give the order to Egerton, and I heard him report to you. You disapproved of his act, and he pleaded misapprehensEgerton, and I heard him report to you. You disapproved of his act, and he pleaded misapprehension of your order. I remain, sir, respectfully, yours, &c., R. S. Mercer, Col. Third Regiment, M. C. I had not retired to my bed when the scuttling of the ferry boat was proposed to me. It was not proposed by men in whom I had no confidence. Highly respectable gentlemen urged it as the easiest and most lawful means of effecting the desired object. Yet I unhesitatingly refused my consent to the step. But the people of Maryland are asked to believe that, after this, in the still watche
Grayson Eichelberger (search for this): chapter 60
e was cooperating, stated that they were determined to resist the passage of Federal troops through Maryland; and, as one of the means to accomplish that end, that the bridges on the railroads leading into Baltimore would be burned or destroyed. Some of us are clear in our recollection that he said the bridges would be destroyed that night. Others are not so clear in our recollection on that point. Very respectfully, your obedient servants, Edward T. Shriver, William P. Maulsby, Grayson Eichelberger, Ulysses Hobbs. The annexed copy of a handbill circulated throughout Western Maryland by Bradley T. Johnson, is evidence that Marshal Kane and his allies had made all the necessary provisions in anticipation of the pre-arranged attack upon the Massachusetts troops: ∧ latest News! Marylanders, arouse! Frederick, Saturday, 7 o'clock A. M., 1861. At 12 o'clock last night, I received the following despatch from Marshal Kane, of Baltimore, by telegraph to the Junction,
Philip Fendall (search for this): chapter 60
precisely twelve o'clock, nine miles and a half from the city. The watchman at the bridge, whom I saw to-day, states positively that when they arrived at the bridge, and penned him in his shanty, it was about ten minutes past one o'clock; and that after cutting the telegraph wires, which took but a few minutes, they fired the bridges at about twenty or twenty-five minutes after one o'clock. As to who the party were, I cannot say; but a gentleman at Cockeysville said that a man named Philip Fendall (I think of the firm of Duvall, Keighler & Co.) was one of the party, but I am not prepared to say so positively. He is a cousin to the wife of John Merryman, now under arrest. Any thing further that I can do for you, I will do with great pleasure. Please excuse this hurried account of the affair, as Mr. Bryson is waiting. Your obedient servant, John H. Longnecker. I have not the slightest doubt that the destruction of the bridges referred to was an important part of the sec
Thomas H. Hicks (search for this): chapter 60
Doc. 56.-the Bridge burning. Letter of Gov. Hicks in reply to Mayor Brown. To the People ofhal George P. Kane called at my house, where Gov. Hicks was passing the night, and Marshal Kane infod myself, went immediately to the chamber of Gov. Hicks and laid the matter before him. The point waernor Hicks, and asked him for his consent. Gov. Hicks' answer was, in substance, although I may noty by peaceable arrangement of some sort. Governor Hicks fully and most distinctly assented to thisdirection; shall the bridges be destroyed? Gov. Hicks emphatically and distinctly replied in the a Parkhurst, May 16, 1861. To His Excellency, Gov. Hicks-- Dear sir: I have just read your card in Towsontown, May 29, 1861. His Excellency, Governor Hicks-- my dear sir: Yours of this date was h Frederick city, Md. His Excellency, Thomas H. Hicks, Governor of Maryland-- Dear sir: We hithfully to serve, and whose interests and safety I have constantly had in view. Thos. H. Hicks. [3 more...]
Ulysses Hobbs (search for this): chapter 60
stated that they were determined to resist the passage of Federal troops through Maryland; and, as one of the means to accomplish that end, that the bridges on the railroads leading into Baltimore would be burned or destroyed. Some of us are clear in our recollection that he said the bridges would be destroyed that night. Others are not so clear in our recollection on that point. Very respectfully, your obedient servants, Edward T. Shriver, William P. Maulsby, Grayson Eichelberger, Ulysses Hobbs. The annexed copy of a handbill circulated throughout Western Maryland by Bradley T. Johnson, is evidence that Marshal Kane and his allies had made all the necessary provisions in anticipation of the pre-arranged attack upon the Massachusetts troops: ∧ latest News! Marylanders, arouse! Frederick, Saturday, 7 o'clock A. M., 1861. At 12 o'clock last night, I received the following despatch from Marshal Kane, of Baltimore, by telegraph to the Junction, and express to Fre
Bradley T. Johnson (search for this): chapter 60
urs of the 23d instant, and, in reply, state that during the night of the 19th of April, ultimo, about one o'clock, Bradley T. Johnson sought and had an interview with us relative to a telegraphic despatch which he had received within an hour before shal of Police of Baltimore City, and which has since appeared in the public prints. In the course of that interview, Mr. Johnson, in unfolding the plans of those with whom he was cooperating, stated that they were determined to resist the passage ayson Eichelberger, Ulysses Hobbs. The annexed copy of a handbill circulated throughout Western Maryland by Bradley T. Johnson, is evidence that Marshal Kane and his allies had made all the necessary provisions in anticipation of the pre-arraficient. They will assemble, after reporting themselves, at 10 1/2 o'clock, so as to go down in the 11 1/2 train. Bradley T. Johnson. Add to this the undeniable fact that many of the volunteer companies in Maryland were eagerly looking for an
George P. Kane (search for this): chapter 60
lock P. M., the Hon. E. Louis Lowe and Marshal George P. Kane called at my house, where Gov. Hicks wle, on their route to Baltimore. Mr. Lowe, Marshal Kane, my brother, John Cumming Brown, and myselfas distinctly given in the affirmative. George P. Kane, in his published certificate, says: cess of execution. The visit of Messrs. Brown, Kane, and Lowe to my bedchamber was at a late hour oful act which was proposed to me by such men as Kane and Lowe, no matter how necessary it might have the charge made by the Mayor of Baltimore, Marshal Kane, and others, that you had given your consenhe had received within an hour before from George P. Kane, Marshal of Police of Baltimore City, and and by Bradley T. Johnson, is evidence that Marshal Kane and his allies had made all the necessary pght, I received the following despatch from Marshal Kane, of Baltimore, by telegraph to the JunctionWe will fight them, and whip them, or die. Geo. P. Kane. All men who will go with me will repo[2 more...]
John H. Longnecker (search for this): chapter 60
es after one o'clock. As to who the party were, I cannot say; but a gentleman at Cockeysville said that a man named Philip Fendall (I think of the firm of Duvall, Keighler & Co.) was one of the party, but I am not prepared to say so positively. He is a cousin to the wife of John Merryman, now under arrest. Any thing further that I can do for you, I will do with great pleasure. Please excuse this hurried account of the affair, as Mr. Bryson is waiting. Your obedient servant, John H. Longnecker. I have not the slightest doubt that the destruction of the bridges referred to was an important part of the secession programme. The necessity of such a step, in furtherance of the evident designs of the secession leaders, must be apparent to all. It little becomes me, however, except for my own vindication, and incidentally, to enter upon an exposition of that plot. Time will fully unveil the plans of the traitors. Already has sufficient been disclosed to satisfy any unprejud
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