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Buckhannon (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
lellan at its head, reached this place yesterday afternoon. Its achievements for the last two or three days will be memorable in the history of our country. I will give them briefly: Two good roads unite at an acute angle at Beverly, one from Buckhannon, and the other from Phillippa. A mountain ridge crosses both roads, and at each point of intersection the rebels made strong intrenchments. The one on the road to Buckhannon is called Rich Mountain Camp, and the other towards Phillippa, LaureBuckhannon is called Rich Mountain Camp, and the other towards Phillippa, Laurel Hill Camp, both under the general command of Gen. Garnett, of Virginia, though he remained at Laurel Hill, appointing Col. Pegram to command at Rich Mountain. Beverly, at the junction of the two roads, was not fortified. The intrenchments at Rich Hill were very strong in position, and could not be taken in any direct manner without great loss of life. On the top of the mountain was a smaller intrenchment. The lower fort was surrounded by dense woods, for a mile in all directions. After as
Red River (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
ed our soldiers. Where Gen. McClellan will go from this point is not known — perhaps to the Kanawha region, to pay his respects to Gov. Wise. Foolish as the Governor is, he is too wise to be caught in the vicinity of Gen. McClellan. We feel very proud of our wise and brave young Major-General. There is a future before him, if his life be spared, which he will make illustrious. He is the son-in-law of Major Marcy, of the United States army. In conversation with Major Marcy about his Red River exploration some years ago, he pleasantly remarked that then McClellan was a lieutenant under him, but now he (Marcy) was under McClellan. P. S.--The news reached the camp to-night that Gen. Garnett is killed. He was followed into the mountains by Gen. Hill. He lost one cannon, several men killed, and several men taken prisoners. I am informed that the Seventh and Ninth Indiana Regiments, Cols. Dumont and Milroy, Fourteenth Ohio, Col. Steadman, and First Artillery, Ohio, Col. Barnett
Leading Creek (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
cast and the weather cold. A drizzling mist commenced falling, which, in an hour or two, turned into a steady, chilling rain, the clouds pouring down their burden in such torrents as you are accustomed to in a June thunder shower. We forded Leading Creek twice, and by the time we reached the miserable little village of New Interest, at the foot of Laurel Mountains, (another range of the Alleghanies, from which the Laurel Hill range is a mere spur,) there was not a dry thread in our clothing. ning, the force pushed forward in a pitiless rain storm, guided by the baggage, tents, trunks, blankets, haversacks, knapsacks, and even clothing, of the flying enemy. It was found by our advanced guard that the enemy, in striking off on the Leading Creek road, had felled trees across it as they fled, to retard the movement of our artillery. Fortunately, a guide directed our men into a cross-road, which, though extremely rough, led again into the route of the enemy, at some distance from the
Laurel Hill, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
led Rich Mountain Camp, and the other towards Phillippa, Laurel Hill Camp, both under the general command of Gen. Garnett, of Virginia, though he remained at Laurel Hill, appointing Col. Pegram to command at Rich Mountain. Beverly, at the junction o news came that Gen. Garnett, who commands the rebels at Laurel Hill, was retreating with his whole force, six thousand men, mountain road leading back again to the western side of Laurel Hill, and across the mountains to the Shafer Fork of Cheat Riogne with which they had been so bountifully supplied at Laurel Hill, and in disgust they fled like a pack of frightened sheetains, (another range of the Alleghanies, from which the Laurel Hill range is a mere spur,) there was not a dry thread in ourhe country, and Gen. Morris in possession of his camp at Laurel Hill. There was little time left for delay. Our boys entehe army of Gen. Morris was to return, via St. George, to Laurel Hill, and go into camp. The three months men will soon retur
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 97
their arms, and sleeping soundly. We were under way in the morning by three o'clock. The sky was overcast and the weather cold. A drizzling mist commenced falling, which, in an hour or two, turned into a steady, chilling rain, the clouds pouring down their burden in such torrents as you are accustomed to in a June thunder shower. We forded Leading Creek twice, and by the time we reached the miserable little village of New Interest, at the foot of Laurel Mountains, (another range of the Alleghanies, from which the Laurel Hill range is a mere spur,) there was not a dry thread in our clothing. Every hair on our heads became a safe conduit for the descending bounty of Jupiter Pluvius. Passing the village a few miles we struck directly over the Mountains, for Cheat River, by a by-road which the rebels had taken. It was of the worst description. At every step the mud grew deeper and the way more difficult, and one felt as though somebody were tugging at his heels to pull off his sh
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 97
erwise wounded, 8; in all, 12. On the other side eight were killed on the field; three died in hospital, and some ten were more or less severely wounded. They carried off many of the wounded in wagons; how many was not known. Prisoners were taken in any quantity; the scouts kept bringing them in all night and the next day till I left. The hills were full of them, and doubtless our forces had more on hand than they could provide for. Among the captured were many officers, including six Georgia captains and lieutenants, a surgeon of the army, (from Richmond,) and a number of non-commissioned officers. We captured two stands of colors, one of the Georgia regiment; one rifled cannon; forty loaded wagons; hundreds of muskets and side arms; the army chest, but how valuable I did not learn; with amount of personal effects and military equipments. This action must speak for itself. To pursue and overtake an enemy having twelve hours the advance; a forced march of nearly thirty mi
John Pegram (search for this): chapter 97
e general command of Gen. Garnett, of Virginia, though he remained at Laurel Hill, appointing Col. Pegram to command at Rich Mountain. Beverly, at the junction of the two roads, was not fortified. a white flag was seen flying over the rebel fort, and it was soon afterwards found deserted. Col. Pegram left as secretly as possible, taking to the woods. He abandoned every thing — tents, horses,as considerable, but has since been greatly increased. There will probably be a thousand, as Col. Pegram, with six hundred men, after wandering in the hills for thirty-six hours, and being completelg to surrender as prisoners of war. The General required an unconditional surrender, to which Col. Pegram submitted. He was brought into our camp at Beverly yesterday. His force is chiefly from Easan was in the jail, but she was liberated. She reports that another woman was carried away. Col. Pegram's army had been very boastful, and fully believed that the Yankees wouldn't fight. It is sai
s Red River exploration some years ago, he pleasantly remarked that then McClellan was a lieutenant under him, but now he (Marcy) was under McClellan. P. S.--The news reached the camp to-night that Gen. Garnett is killed. He was followed into the mountains by Gen. Hill. He lost one cannon, several men killed, and several men taken prisoners. I am informed that the Seventh and Ninth Indiana Regiments, Cols. Dumont and Milroy, Fourteenth Ohio, Col. Steadman, and First Artillery, Ohio, Col. Barnett, were engaged in this work of routing the rebels in the mountains. I go up to Beverly to-day and shall learn all the particulars. --N. Y. Times, July 20th. Cinoinnati Gazette narrative. To understand the exact location of the battle field it should be remembered that the enemy, after leaving the Beverly pike, had taken a mountain road leading back again to the western side of Laurel Hill, and across the mountains to the Shafer Fork of Cheat River, intending to proceed dow
Herman Fisher (search for this): chapter 97
amous regiment could not be brought into direct collision with the enemy. The losses on our side were as follows: Fourteenth Ohio--killed: Samuel Mills, Company A, shot through the head; Henry Reifeldiver, third sergeant, Company C, killed by cannon shot through left breast. Mortally wounded: Daniel Mills, Company A, in leg — since died; John Kneehouse, Company A, shot in side. Seriously wounded: Henry Murrow, Company B, in side; Casper Sinalf, Company D, in wrist. Slightly wounded: Capt. Fisher, Company C, in face; privates S. Richards, in arm; Richard Henderson, in calf of his leg; orderly Charles Greenwood, along side of his head; William Smith, Company K, buckshot in hip — flesh wound; Lieutenant Sherman, Company K, finger shot off. Several others were slightly scratched. Total: killed, 2; mortally wounded, 2; otherwise wounded, 8; in all, 12. On the other side eight were killed on the field; three died in hospital, and some ten were more or less severely wounded. They c
S. Richards (search for this): chapter 97
to direct collision with the enemy. The losses on our side were as follows: Fourteenth Ohio--killed: Samuel Mills, Company A, shot through the head; Henry Reifeldiver, third sergeant, Company C, killed by cannon shot through left breast. Mortally wounded: Daniel Mills, Company A, in leg — since died; John Kneehouse, Company A, shot in side. Seriously wounded: Henry Murrow, Company B, in side; Casper Sinalf, Company D, in wrist. Slightly wounded: Capt. Fisher, Company C, in face; privates S. Richards, in arm; Richard Henderson, in calf of his leg; orderly Charles Greenwood, along side of his head; William Smith, Company K, buckshot in hip — flesh wound; Lieutenant Sherman, Company K, finger shot off. Several others were slightly scratched. Total: killed, 2; mortally wounded, 2; otherwise wounded, 8; in all, 12. On the other side eight were killed on the field; three died in hospital, and some ten were more or less severely wounded. They carried off many of the wounded in wago
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