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George B. Mccleltan (search for this): chapter 97
f prisoners we have taken will amount to at least one thousand. We have captured seven of the enemy's guns in all. A portion of Garnett's forces retreated, but I look for their capture by General Hill, who is in hot pursuit. The troops that Garnett had under his command are said to be the crack regiments of Eastern Virginia, aided by Georgians, Tennesseeans and Carolinians. Our success is complete, and I firmly believe that secession is killed in this section of the country. George B. Mccleltan, Major-General U. S. A. McClellan's operations in Western Virginia. U. S. Camp, near Huttonsville, Randolph Co., Va., Sunday, July 14, 1860. the Army, with Major-Gen. McClellan at its head, reached this place yesterday afternoon. Its achievements for the last two or three days will be memorable in the history of our country. I will give them briefly: Two good roads unite at an acute angle at Beverly, one from Buckhannon, and the other from Phillippa. A mountain ridge cr
s. He took deliberate aim, but, unlike the parson, after every fire he added the invariable formula, God d — n your secession souls, how do you like the Yankees? Another, an Englishman, was wounded. Steedman noticed him limping and called out Jack, are you wounded? Yes, I'm ‘it. Where are you hit, Jack? Oh, I'm ‘it in the ‘ip, but--(in great anxiety lest Steedman should send him to the hospital) but it don't ‘urt me. I'm only ‘it in the ‘ip; it don't ‘urt me, and away he blazed with anotJack? Oh, I'm ‘it in the ‘ip, but--(in great anxiety lest Steedman should send him to the hospital) but it don't ‘urt me. I'm only ‘it in the ‘ip; it don't ‘urt me, and away he blazed with another load, somewhat profanely adding, God d — n you, I guess I paid you off that time. Agate. Cincinnati Commercial narrative. camp Dupont, Carrick's Ford, 8 miles south of St. George, Tucker County, Va., July 13. I have a dismal recollection of a dreary, weary, forced march of nineteen miles over almost impassable mountain roads, mud knee-deep, with a steady heavy rain falling all the way and terminating in a fierce engagement of half an hour, the total rout
Charles Greenwood (search for this): chapter 97
llows: Fourteenth Ohio--killed: Samuel Mills, Company A, shot through the head; Henry Reifeldiver, third sergeant, Company C, killed by cannon shot through left breast. Mortally wounded: Daniel Mills, Company A, in leg — since died; John Kneehouse, Company A, shot in side. Seriously wounded: Henry Murrow, Company B, in side; Casper Sinalf, Company D, in wrist. Slightly wounded: Capt. Fisher, Company C, in face; privates S. Richards, in arm; Richard Henderson, in calf of his leg; orderly Charles Greenwood, along side of his head; William Smith, Company K, buckshot in hip — flesh wound; Lieutenant Sherman, Company K, finger shot off. Several others were slightly scratched. Total: killed, 2; mortally wounded, 2; otherwise wounded, 8; in all, 12. On the other side eight were killed on the field; three died in hospital, and some ten were more or less severely wounded. They carried off many of the wounded in wagons; how many was not known. Prisoners were taken in any quantity; the
W. S. Rosecrans (search for this): chapter 97
nchment. The lower fort was surrounded by dense woods, for a mile in all directions. After ascertaining its position and strength, Gen. McClellan early sent Gen. Rosecrans, with the Eighth and Tenth Indiana Regiments, with the Nineteenth Ohio, to go around along the top of the mountain, to get upon the east side of the intrenchments, so as to surround the enemy. After going nine miles, through woods and over rocks, a march which Col. Lander, who was along, says is without an equal. Gen. Rosecrans came out upon the intrenchments at the top of the hill. They received a fire from the two guns, (six-pounders,) which killed one man and wounded several. Imrobably when the woods are searched the number will be increased. Our loss was very small, comparatively, not more than twenty or twenty-five being killed. General Rosecrans remained on the ground. His victory, however, was not known to Gen. McClellan, who heard the noise of the firing, but was in ignorance of the result. Durin
s are known by his name. In crossing the first of these fords to the right side of the river (as we were advancing) one of their wagons mired, and those in the rear had to halt until it could be relieved. The rebels meantime drew up in line on the opposite side of an oat field, and were concealed by a rail fence and the trees and bushes fringing that bank of the river. The bluff is from 50 to 80 feet higher than the land on the opposite side, down which the Ohio 14th was advancing, with Capt. Moe's company thrown out as skirmishers. As the skirmishers pressed on towards the ford, the teamsters cried out, Don't shoot! don't shoot! We are going to surrender. The Captain then called to the Colonel, Come on, Col. Steedman, they are going to surrender, and the regiment was ordered to advance at a double quick. As he came opposite the bank where the rebels were drawn up, Gen. Garnett cried, Three cheers for Jeff. Davis, and that instant the whole line was a blaze of light, as they p
Henry Murrow (search for this): chapter 97
of Buena Vista, while the chivalric Colonel Millroy chafed like a lion because his now famous regiment could not be brought into direct collision with the enemy. The losses on our side were as follows: Fourteenth Ohio--killed: Samuel Mills, Company A, shot through the head; Henry Reifeldiver, third sergeant, Company C, killed by cannon shot through left breast. Mortally wounded: Daniel Mills, Company A, in leg — since died; John Kneehouse, Company A, shot in side. Seriously wounded: Henry Murrow, Company B, in side; Casper Sinalf, Company D, in wrist. Slightly wounded: Capt. Fisher, Company C, in face; privates S. Richards, in arm; Richard Henderson, in calf of his leg; orderly Charles Greenwood, along side of his head; William Smith, Company K, buckshot in hip — flesh wound; Lieutenant Sherman, Company K, finger shot off. Several others were slightly scratched. Total: killed, 2; mortally wounded, 2; otherwise wounded, 8; in all, 12. On the other side eight were killed on th
ailed to convey the body to Grafton, via Rowlesburg, and to return his sword, (evidently a family relic, and presented by Gen. George M. Brooke,) and other personal effects, to his family. The correspondents of the Commercial and Gazette, and Mr. Ricketts, (one of four brothers in the Indiana Seventh, all as brave and true men as are in the army,) were to act as escorts. A mule team, attached to an ambulance which had been captured the previous day, were the best outfit we could find for the penth were encamped. From some experience among pickets, I felt apprehensive that they would fire upon us, but Major Gordon felt sure they would halt us before firing, especially as we bore the flag of truce. We were jogging along pleasantly, Mr. Ricketts riding before, picking out the way, when pop, pop, pop, went several guns, within thirty paces, the bullets whistling unpleasantly close to our ears. We hallooed to them to stop firing, that we were friends without the countersign, bearing
Robert S. Garnett (search for this): chapter 97
n. His army are completely demoralized. General Garnett was killed while attempting to rally his ill Camp, both under the general command of Gen. Garnett, of Virginia, though he remained at Laurel re killed. Yesterday, the news came that Gen. Garnett, who commands the rebels at Laurel Hill, wain Gap — but their haste would not permit. Gen. Garnett, with six thousand men, is also on what Colis side, while his companions fled. When Gen. Garnett fell it was only known that he was an offiche officers vainly trying to rally them. Gen. Garnett was the last to cross the ford, which he dirushing along like a whirlwind, to come on. Gen. Garnett directed the attention of his panic strickewas standing. The Major at the same time saw Garnett, and pointing him out to a squad of Capt. Feragain crosses the stream, and at this point Gen. Garnett endeavored vainly to stop his routed troopsan be ungrateful to republics. In person General Garnett was about five feet eight inches, rather [22 more...]
lar and handsome features, almost classic in their regularity and mingled delicacy and strength of beauty. His hair, almost coal black, as were his eyes, he wore long on the neck, in the prevailing fashion among the Virginia aristocracy. His dress was of fine blue broadcloth throughout, and richly ornamented. The buttons bore the coat of arms of the State of Virginia, and the star on his shoulder-strap was richly studded with brilliants. Major Gordon was detailed to convey the body to Grafton, via Rowlesburg, and to return his sword, (evidently a family relic, and presented by Gen. George M. Brooke,) and other personal effects, to his family. The correspondents of the Commercial and Gazette, and Mr. Ricketts, (one of four brothers in the Indiana Seventh, all as brave and true men as are in the army,) were to act as escorts. A mule team, attached to an ambulance which had been captured the previous day, were the best outfit we could find for the purpose of the 30 miles of rough
the hill in utter rout. They were pursued about two miles, when our exhausted men were recalled. Gen. Morris, however, is to follow on to Rowlesburg. Crow Hill is situated beyond West Union, where, it is hoped, the remnants of the force will be secured. Garnett's body was brought to this place to-day, and properly cared for, and word has been sent to his friends that it is at their disposal. The rout and demoralization of the rebel army is most utter and complete. Our four columns — Cox's, up the Kanawha, McClellan's, over the mountains at Huttonsville, and Morris's and Hill's, along Cheat River — are all following up the advantage, and moving on. Another narrative. Grafton, Virginia, July 15, 1861. The day after the battle, and all was quiet, where but a few hours before armies had contended. The dead of the enemy were collected on the field and buried, with those who died at the hospital, at night. The brave young Georgian who stood by the side of his equally
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