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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Fort Morgan (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
ed work. We supposed they were mounting a battery on the hulk, and resolved to put a stop to it at all hazards. During the evening three of our largest boats were got out in readiness, filled with about 40 men, and taken in tow by the gunboat Mount Vernon. When within a mile, and in shoal water, we out oars and shoved off, making a sweep directly under the guns of Fort Gaines, and succeeded in cutting off the desired prize. While this manoeuvre was being executed, the ramparts of both Fort Morgan and Fort Gaines were covered with an indignant and impertinent-looking crowd. I cannot see why Fort Gaines did not open fire upon our boats — we certainly expected them to do so — the distance being only about three-quarters of a mile between us. The crew of the schooner (16 in number) were engaged in removing the masts, &c., of the wreeked ship, and, as you may imagine, were greatly surprised at the capture of their craft, which had just been newly fitted up for the campaign. Among her
Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
ing out A prize.--The correspondent of the N. Y. Times, writing from the U. S. steamer Niagara, off Mobile, June 6, gives the following account of an exciting exploit:-- A daring and successful exploit occurred last evening, with three of the Niagara's boats, fully armed and manned, under the command of Lieut. John Guest, with Midshipmen O'Kane, Swann, and Casey, as aides. During the day we noticed a large schooner go alongside of the wreck of a large English ship, near the entrance of Mobile Bay, where she erected shears and commenced work. We supposed they were mounting a battery on the hulk, and resolved to put a stop to it at all hazards. During the evening three of our largest boats were got out in readiness, filled with about 40 men, and taken in tow by the gunboat Mount Vernon. When within a mile, and in shoal water, we out oars and shoved off, making a sweep directly under the guns of Fort Gaines, and succeeded in cutting off the desired prize. While this manoeuvre was
Fort Gaines (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
en, and taken in tow by the gunboat Mount Vernon. When within a mile, and in shoal water, we out oars and shoved off, making a sweep directly under the guns of Fort Gaines, and succeeded in cutting off the desired prize. While this manoeuvre was being executed, the ramparts of both Fort Morgan and Fort Gaines were covered with anFort Gaines were covered with an indignant and impertinent-looking crowd. I cannot see why Fort Gaines did not open fire upon our boats — we certainly expected them to do so — the distance being only about three-quarters of a mile between us. The crew of the schooner (16 in number) were engaged in removing the masts, &c., of the wreeked ship, and, as you may imaFort Gaines did not open fire upon our boats — we certainly expected them to do so — the distance being only about three-quarters of a mile between us. The crew of the schooner (16 in number) were engaged in removing the masts, &c., of the wreeked ship, and, as you may imagine, were greatly surprised at the capture of their craft, which had just been newly fitted up for the campaign. Among her papers was found a permit to enter and depart from the harbor of Pensacola, signed by that damnable traitor Ex-Lieut. F. B. Renshaw, as Chief of Police. This gentleman seems to be rising fast — from a Lie
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
cutting out A prize.--The correspondent of the N. Y. Times, writing from the U. S. steamer Niagara, off Mobile, June 6, gives the following account of an exciting exploit:-- A daring and successful exploit occurred last evening, with three of the Niagara's boats, fully armed and manned, under the command of Lieut. John Guest, with Midshipmen O'Kane, Swann, and Casey, as aides. During the day we noticed a large schooner go alongside of the wreck of a large English ship, near the entrance of Pensacola, signed by that damnable traitor Ex-Lieut. F. B. Renshaw, as Chief of Police. This gentleman seems to be rising fast — from a Lieutenant in the United States Navy to Chief of Police in the rebel forces! The prize (named the Aid, of Mobile, and worth probably $4,000) now lies at anchor under our quarter, and is being fitted with a couple of 24-pound howitzers. She will be commanded by Acting-Licutenant O'Kane, and will hereafter overhaul all ships wishing to enter this harbor. Th
Pensacola (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 114
ooking crowd. I cannot see why Fort Gaines did not open fire upon our boats — we certainly expected them to do so — the distance being only about three-quarters of a mile between us. The crew of the schooner (16 in number) were engaged in removing the masts, &c., of the wreeked ship, and, as you may imagine, were greatly surprised at the capture of their craft, which had just been newly fitted up for the campaign. Among her papers was found a permit to enter and depart from the harbor of Pensacola, signed by that damnable traitor Ex-Lieut. F. B. Renshaw, as Chief of Police. This gentleman seems to be rising fast — from a Lieutenant in the United States Navy to Chief of Police in the rebel forces! The prize (named the Aid, of Mobile, and worth probably $4,000) now lies at anchor under our quarter, and is being fitted with a couple of 24-pound howitzers. She will be commanded by Acting-Licutenant O'Kane, and will hereafter overhaul all ships wishing to enter this harbor. The reb<
cutting out A prize.--The correspondent of the N. Y. Times, writing from the U. S. steamer Niagara, off Mobile, June 6, gives the following account of an exciting exploit:-- A daring and successful exploit occurred last evening, with three of the Niagara's boats, fully armed and manned, under the command of Lieut. John Guest, with Midshipmen O'Kane, Swann, and Casey, as aides. During the day we noticed a large schooner go alongside of the wreck of a large English ship, near the entrance of Mobile Bay, where she erected shears and commenced work. We supposed they were mounting a battery on the hulk, and resolved to put a stop to it at all hazards. During the evening three of our largest boats were got out in readiness, filled with about 40 men, and taken in tow by the gunboat Mount Vernon. When within a mile, and in shoal water, we out oars and shoved off, making a sweep directly under the guns of Fort Gaines, and succeeded in cutting off the desired prize. While this manoeuv
Acting-Licutenant O'Kane (search for this): chapter 114
ara, off Mobile, June 6, gives the following account of an exciting exploit:-- A daring and successful exploit occurred last evening, with three of the Niagara's boats, fully armed and manned, under the command of Lieut. John Guest, with Midshipmen O'Kane, Swann, and Casey, as aides. During the day we noticed a large schooner go alongside of the wreck of a large English ship, near the entrance of Mobile Bay, where she erected shears and commenced work. We supposed they were mounting a battates Navy to Chief of Police in the rebel forces! The prize (named the Aid, of Mobile, and worth probably $4,000) now lies at anchor under our quarter, and is being fitted with a couple of 24-pound howitzers. She will be commanded by Acting-Licutenant O'Kane, and will hereafter overhaul all ships wishing to enter this harbor. The rebels have one of Uncle Samuel's revenue cutters here, in their possession, with four guns mounted on her, which we hope now soon to be able to capture with the s
F. B. Renshaw (search for this): chapter 114
t open fire upon our boats — we certainly expected them to do so — the distance being only about three-quarters of a mile between us. The crew of the schooner (16 in number) were engaged in removing the masts, &c., of the wreeked ship, and, as you may imagine, were greatly surprised at the capture of their craft, which had just been newly fitted up for the campaign. Among her papers was found a permit to enter and depart from the harbor of Pensacola, signed by that damnable traitor Ex-Lieut. F. B. Renshaw, as Chief of Police. This gentleman seems to be rising fast — from a Lieutenant in the United States Navy to Chief of Police in the rebel forces! The prize (named the Aid, of Mobile, and worth probably $4,000) now lies at anchor under our quarter, and is being fitted with a couple of 24-pound howitzers. She will be commanded by Acting-Licutenant O'Kane, and will hereafter overhaul all ships wishing to enter this harbor. The rebels have one of Uncle Samuel's revenue cutters her<
cutting out A prize.--The correspondent of the N. Y. Times, writing from the U. S. steamer Niagara, off Mobile, June 6, gives the following account of an exciting exploit:-- A daring and successful exploit occurred last evening, with three of the Niagara's boats, fully armed and manned, under the command of Lieut. John Guest, with Midshipmen O'Kane, Swann, and Casey, as aides. During the day we noticed a large schooner go alongside of the wreck of a large English ship, near the entrance of Mobile Bay, where she erected shears and commenced work. We supposed they were mounting a battery on the hulk, and resolved to put a stop to it at all hazards. During the evening three of our largest boats were got out in readiness, filled with about 40 men, and taken in tow by the gunboat Mount Vernon. When within a mile, and in shoal water, we out oars and shoved off, making a sweep directly under the guns of Fort Gaines, and succeeded in cutting off the desired prize. While this manoeuv
cutting out A prize.--The correspondent of the N. Y. Times, writing from the U. S. steamer Niagara, off Mobile, June 6, gives the following account of an exciting exploit:-- A daring and successful exploit occurred last evening, with three of the Niagara's boats, fully armed and manned, under the command of Lieut. John Guest, with Midshipmen O'Kane, Swann, and Casey, as aides. During the day we noticed a large schooner go alongside of the wreck of a large English ship, near the entrance of Mobile Bay, where she erected shears and commenced work. We supposed they were mounting a battery on the hulk, and resolved to put a stop to it at all hazards. During the evening three of our largest boats were got out in readiness, filled with about 40 men, and taken in tow by the gunboat Mount Vernon. When within a mile, and in shoal water, we out oars and shoved off, making a sweep directly under the guns of Fort Gaines, and succeeded in cutting off the desired prize. While this manoeuv
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