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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
py the minds of his traducers — let, then, that synopsis answer the same purpose for me in this instance. If certain minds cannot understand the difference between patriotism, the highest civic virtue, and office-seeking, the lowest civic occupation, I pity them from the bottom of my heart. Suffice it to say that I prefer the respect and esteem of my countrymen to the admiration and envy of the world. I hope, for the sake of our cause and country, to be able, with the assistance of kind Providence, to answer my calumniators with new victories over our national enemies, but I have nothing to ask of the country, Government, or any friends, except to afford me all the aid they can in the great struggle we are now engaged upon. I am not either a candidate, nor do I desire to be a candidate, for any civil office in the gift of the people or Executive. The aim of my ambition, after having cast my mite in the defence of our sacred cause, and assisted, to the best of my ability, in securin
Centreville (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 133
Doc. 129. Beaureguard's letter. Centreville, within hearing of the enemy's guns, Sunday, Nov. 3, 1861. To Editors Richmond Whig: Gentlemen: My attention has just been called to an unfortunate controversy now going on relative to the publication of a synopsis of my report of the battle of Manassas. None can regret more than I do this, from a knowledge that, by authority, the President is the sole judge of when and what part of the commanding officer's report shall be made public. I, individually, do not object to delaying its publication as long as the War Department thinks proper and necessary for the success of our cause. Meanwhile I entreat my friends not to trouble themselves about refuting the slanders and calumnies aimed against me. Alcibiades, on a certain occasion, resorted to an extraordinary method to occupy the minds of his traducers — let, then, that synopsis answer the same purpose for me in this instance. If certain minds cannot understand the difference be
P. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 133
upation, I pity them from the bottom of my heart. Suffice it to say that I prefer the respect and esteem of my countrymen to the admiration and envy of the world. I hope, for the sake of our cause and country, to be able, with the assistance of kind Providence, to answer my calumniators with new victories over our national enemies, but I have nothing to ask of the country, Government, or any friends, except to afford me all the aid they can in the great struggle we are now engaged upon. I am not either a candidate, nor do I desire to be a candidate, for any civil office in the gift of the people or Executive. The aim of my ambition, after having cast my mite in the defence of our sacred cause, and assisted, to the best of my ability, in securing our rights and independence as a nation, is to retire to private life, my means then permitting, never again to leave my home, unless to fight anew the battles of my country. Respectfully, your most obedient servant, P. T. Beauregard.
Doc. 129. Beaureguard's letter. Centreville, within hearing of the enemy's guns, Sunday, Nov. 3, 1861. To Editors Richmond Whig: Gentlemen: My attention has just been called to an unfortunate controversy now going on relative to the publication of a synopsis of my report of the battle of Manassas. None can regret more than I do this, from a knowledge that, by authority, the President is the sole judge of when and what part of the commanding officer's report shall be made public. I, individually, do not object to delaying its publication as long as the War Department thinks proper and necessary for the success of our cause. Meanwhile I entreat my friends not to trouble themselves about refuting the slanders and calumnies aimed against me. Alcibiades, on a certain occasion, resorted to an extraordinary method to occupy the minds of his traducers — let, then, that synopsis answer the same purpose for me in this instance. If certain minds cannot understand the difference be
Beaureguard (search for this): chapter 133
Doc. 129. Beaureguard's letter. Centreville, within hearing of the enemy's guns, Sunday, Nov. 3, 1861. To Editors Richmond Whig: Gentlemen: My attention has just been called to an unfortunate controversy now going on relative to the publication of a synopsis of my report of the battle of Manassas. None can regret more than I do this, from a knowledge that, by authority, the President is the sole judge of when and what part of the commanding officer's report shall be made public. I, individually, do not object to delaying its publication as long as the War Department thinks proper and necessary for the success of our cause. Meanwhile I entreat my friends not to trouble themselves about refuting the slanders and calumnies aimed against me. Alcibiades, on a certain occasion, resorted to an extraordinary method to occupy the minds of his traducers — let, then, that synopsis answer the same purpose for me in this instance. If certain minds cannot understand the difference be
is of my report of the battle of Manassas. None can regret more than I do this, from a knowledge that, by authority, the President is the sole judge of when and what part of the commanding officer's report shall be made public. I, individually, do not object to delaying its publication as long as the War Department thinks proper and necessary for the success of our cause. Meanwhile I entreat my friends not to trouble themselves about refuting the slanders and calumnies aimed against me. Alcibiades, on a certain occasion, resorted to an extraordinary method to occupy the minds of his traducers — let, then, that synopsis answer the same purpose for me in this instance. If certain minds cannot understand the difference between patriotism, the highest civic virtue, and office-seeking, the lowest civic occupation, I pity them from the bottom of my heart. Suffice it to say that I prefer the respect and esteem of my countrymen to the admiration and envy of the world. I hope, for the sak
November 3rd, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 133
Doc. 129. Beaureguard's letter. Centreville, within hearing of the enemy's guns, Sunday, Nov. 3, 1861. To Editors Richmond Whig: Gentlemen: My attention has just been called to an unfortunate controversy now going on relative to the publication of a synopsis of my report of the battle of Manassas. None can regret more than I do this, from a knowledge that, by authority, the President is the sole judge of when and what part of the commanding officer's report shall be made public. I, individually, do not object to delaying its publication as long as the War Department thinks proper and necessary for the success of our cause. Meanwhile I entreat my friends not to trouble themselves about refuting the slanders and calumnies aimed against me. Alcibiades, on a certain occasion, resorted to an extraordinary method to occupy the minds of his traducers — let, then, that synopsis answer the same purpose for me in this instance. If certain minds cannot understand the difference bet