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Headquarters (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
Secession reports. General Polk's despatch. Headquarters, First Div. West, Department, Columbus, Ky., Nov. 7, 1861. To General Headquarters, through General A. S. Johnson: The enemy came down on the opposite side of the river, Belmont, to-day, about seven thousand five hundred strong, landed under cover of gunboats, and attacked Col. Tappan's camp. I sent over three regiments under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply o
Columbus, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 138
Secession reports. General Polk's despatch. Headquarters, First Div. West, Department, Columbus, Ky., Nov. 7, 1861. To General Headquarters, through General A. S. Johnson: The enemy came down on the opposite side of the river, Belmont, to-day, about seven thousand five hundred strong, landed under cover of gunboats, and attacked Col. Tappan's camp. I sent over three regiments under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply
James Davis (search for this): chapter 138
nts under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply of President Davis. Richmond, Nov. 8, 1861. To Major-General Polk: Your telegraph received. Accept for yourself, and the officers and men under your command, my sincere thanks for the glorious contribution you have just made to our common cause. Our countrymen must long remember gratefully to read the activity and skill, courage and devotion of the army at Belmont. J. Davis.
Beltzhoover (search for this): chapter 138
eral A. S. Johnson: The enemy came down on the opposite side of the river, Belmont, to-day, about seven thousand five hundred strong, landed under cover of gunboats, and attacked Col. Tappan's camp. I sent over three regiments under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply of President Davis. Richmond, Nov. 8, 1861. To Major-General Polk: Your telegraph received. Accept for yourself, and the officers and men under your comm
Secession reports. General Polk's despatch. Headquarters, First Div. West, Department, Columbus, Ky., Nov. 7, 1861. To General Headquarters, through General A. S. Johnson: The enemy came down on the opposite side of the river, Belmont, to-day, about seven thousand five hundred strong, landed under cover of gunboats, and attacked Col. Tappan's camp. I sent over three regiments under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over twheir boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply of President Davis. Richmond, Nov. 8, 1861. To Major-General Polk: Your telegraph received. Accept for yourself, and the officers and men under your command, my sincere thanks for the glorious contribution you have just made to our common cause. Our countrymen must long remember gratefully to read th
A. S. Johnson (search for this): chapter 138
Secession reports. General Polk's despatch. Headquarters, First Div. West, Department, Columbus, Ky., Nov. 7, 1861. To General Headquarters, through General A. S. Johnson: The enemy came down on the opposite side of the river, Belmont, to-day, about seven thousand five hundred strong, landed under cover of gunboats, and attacked Col. Tappan's camp. I sent over three regiments under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply
Leonidas Polk (search for this): chapter 138
ents under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply of President Davis. Richmond, Nov. 8, 1861. To Major-General Polk: Your telegraph received. Accept for yourself, and the officers and men under your command, my sincere thanks for the glorious contribution you have just made to our common cause. Our countrymen must long remember gratefully to read the activity and skill, courage and devotion of the army at Belmont. J. Davis.
Gideon J. Pillow (search for this): chapter 138
Secession reports. General Polk's despatch. Headquarters, First Div. West, Department, Columbus, Ky., Nov. 7, 1861. To General Headquarters, through General A. S. Johnson: The enemy came down on the opposite side of the river, Belmont, to-day, about seven thousand five hundred strong, landed under cover of gunboats, and attacked Col. Tappan's camp. I sent over three regiments under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply
nts under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply of President Davis. Richmond, Nov. 8, 1861. To Major-General Polk: Your telegraph received. Accept for yourself, and the officers and men under your command, my sincere thanks for the glorious contribution you have just made to our common cause. Our countrymen must long remember gratefully to read the activity and skill, courage and devotion of the army at Belmont. J. Davis.
Secession reports. General Polk's despatch. Headquarters, First Div. West, Department, Columbus, Ky., Nov. 7, 1861. To General Headquarters, through General A. S. Johnson: The enemy came down on the opposite side of the river, Belmont, to-day, about seven thousand five hundred strong, landed under cover of gunboats, and attacked Col. Tappan's camp. I sent over three regiments under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply
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